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Charlie Woody

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A friend wants me to replace a cornice and plinth on a bookcase.

The plinth is 120mm tall and needs to be mitred at the front sides.

I have a SCMS but max cut is about 75mm (height) which will do left and right 45 degree cuts but the workpiece will not fit under the blade.

Also available is a table saw. The blade tilts to the left and the sliding table runs to the left of the blade.

I don't have a hand mitre saw like the norbex etc and don't want to buy one for a one off job.

I just can't work out a way of dealing with the tall plinth so would like some pearls of wisdom from all you clever people out there please!!!
 

Bradshaw Joinery

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you could make yourself a shooting board for doing a accurate mitre.

im sure someone will be along with a link to making one, i really must get one with some work. haha.

does the saw bevel over, and then lay the plinth flat?
 

Chems

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I assume it is a compound mitre from what you've said. The only accurate way I've ever found to do it is to fix it at the angle it will be fixed at, then cut the end mitre. But even tilted forward its not going to be 75mm. Personally I'd set it up at the angle on your sliding table, run it over your saw which will make a partial cut. Then cut the last bit by hand and clean the face of that cut using the first cut as a reference. You'd need to use the mitre gauge for one side of the mitre.
 

AndyT

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You could use your power saw to make a mitre box then use the box to help you saw the plinth and cornice mouldings by hand. Trimming to fit will need a sharp plane, and preferably a shooting board, as has been said. Mitres can be challenging especially on large sections.
 

jasonB

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Lay the cornice flat and use the 35deg and a bit angle setting that most have for cutting crown moulding.

If its not a standard angle somewhere on the dewalt site there is a table for what angle to set the saw at to cut the item flat.

J

Edit, this is the page but I can't get teh tables at teh bottom to show up, may just be my computer

http://www.dewalt.com/featured-articles ... -saws.aspx
 

lincs1963

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For the plinth, set mitre angle to 90 degrees and tilt compound bevel angle to 45 degrees. just like cutting skirtings.
HTH, Neil
 

Steve Maskery

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Compound angles are tricky,but obviously not impossible, to get right. Your options are either to lay the workpiece flat anf tilt the blade, with the mitre fence twisted, ir to build a jig to hold the workpice at the right slant na leep the blade vertical. The latter is easier to use but you have a reduced depth of cut.

There are resources out there that deal with this exact problem...
You could always invest and add the modest cost to the job :)
S
 

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