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hooked on hardwood

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kityuser

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chuffed to bits :D

https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/gallery/member.php

I have to echo what waterhead37 said in a previous thread, hardwood is a completely different game, and one that I now love....... (as you may be able to guess, I`m hooked).

Although I have told Mrs Kityuser that she should wait to see what the ash door looks like (when its finished) she insists that I start making the other 23 odd beech doors for the new kitchen :? or should that be :D ???

hooked on hardwood

steve
 

DaveL

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Steve,

That door looks splendid, I like the way hardwood cuts compared to pine, its more precise. :shock:

Have you decided what finish you are going to use? That grain needs to be displayed. :D
 

johnelliott

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Steve Maskery":23bgibdl said:
Steve
Give me ash over beech any day
Steve
Second that. Beech is OK for rolling pins and breadboards etc. Ash is the stuff to use. Avoid oak, it's as common in kitchens now as Union flags on cars.
John
 

johnelliott

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The ideal finish, quick and easy, will really bring out the beauty of the grain, is Danish oil. With frame and panel doors, you will of course want to put the finsh on BEFORE you assemble the door. This is of course so that when the centre panel shrinks a bit there no unfinsished bits will show, it will also stop you getting a pale area where the glue squeezeout is wiped off.
John
 

Aragorn

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John
Do you take it to your final finish before assembly (i.e. 5-6 coats) or do you put on more finish once assembled?

Thanks
Aragorn
 

johnelliott

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Aragorn":vs3937f5 said:
John
Do you take it to your final finish before assembly (i.e. 5-6 coats) or do you put on more finish once assembled?

Thanks
Aragorn
5-6!!!!!! :shock: :shock: :shock:

TWO is the most I put on. Anymore than that and it starts to develop a sheen. As soon as it starts to shine is when all the minute ( or larger!)scratches show. Keep it matt and it's suprising just what you can get away with.
I tend to think in commercial terms, if the customer is happy then I'm happy,and the less time it takes to get the work to that point then the happier I am, and the healthier my business. I've done three kitchens in danish oiled Ash finished matt (ie 2 coats) , and had nothing but praise. I don't think the average lady wants a shiny kitchen, anyway
John

PS Yes, I do put all the finish that I am using on before assembling the door. The trick I use, which I picked up from Bulthaup (you should see how much money they get for a kitchen!), is to chamfer all the styles and rails, that leaves a v groove where the rail meets the style. The squeezeout stays in the groove and is easily removed without messing up the faces, which I mask anyway.
 

kityuser

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john:

sounds good but that does`nt allow you to final sand once the door is constructed?????? are all your joints good enough that they don`t need a quick rub over with some 600 ???????

ash is to follow shortly......


steve

ps I bourght the timber as rough sawn 50mmx150mm and re-sawed to get the 20mm thickness I needed, Is this the best way????
 

DaveL

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kityuser":3nw8x4lw said:
I bourght the timber as rough sawn 50mmx150mm and re-sawed to get the 20mm thickness I needed, Is this the best way????
I would have bought 1" and planed/thicknessed down to 3/4". I have only just got a band saw so your method is now open to me, the advantage of resawing for the panels is you could book match the grain which with some wood looks really good.

The only other consideration is the cost of the timber, is 50mm more per cube than 25mm ? If it is then you save money buying the thinner stock.
 

johnelliott

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kityuser":1hrhvkbw said:
john:

sounds good but that does`nt allow you to final sand once the door is constructed?????? are all your joints good enough that they don`t need a quick rub over with some 600 ???????
That's the other advantage of the chamfer groove! No one notices that the rail might be as much as a millimetre or more higher or lower than the style, so no need to sand flat after joining!

John
 

kityuser

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ah!! I see, sadly the misses likes the "flush" look.

These are all very useful comments, thanx all.


my startrite bands resawed the 50x150mm with no problems, I`m chuffed with that as well!.

john, some people have suggested a water based poly, would you not suggest that? I plan on doing a prototype in each so that mrs Kityuser can descide what she wants.

would you again apply the finish before final assembly with the poly finish???? (sorry, I guess these questions are getting a bit "finishing" and probably off catagory)
 

johnelliott

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Here's a pic of the style of solid door what I used to do. Note that the chamfer groove is not very noticeable. In fact, only other woodworkers notice it at all.
It's finished with 2 coats of Danish oil. Danish oil is good because it soaks in and 'lights up' the grain. Varnishes lie on top, and are easily damaged when assembling a door.

John
 

Dewy

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johnelliott":1s7y3ewk said:
The ideal finish, quick and easy, will really bring out the beauty of the grain, is Danish oil. With frame and panel doors, you will of course want to put the finsh on BEFORE you assemble the door. This is of course so that when the centre panel shrinks a bit there no unfinsished bits will show, it will also stop you getting a pale area where the glue squeezeout is wiped off.
John
This has an advantage in that when gluing up the frame, the glue doesn't stick to the finished panel therefore preventing splitting.
I had a couple of coffee tables that broke & after gluing up the tenons again (I hadn't doweled them) the glue stuck inside the joints but not on the outside so was easily removed. Repair? What repair?
 

Aragorn

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Hi John
Thanks for your advice here. I'm a little surprised that 2 coats of Danish is enough protection for a kitchen, but welcome the info all the same! I have a kitchen job upcoming. Perhaps I'll split the difference and put on 4 coats!
 
A

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HI all

What's wrong with Beech then?

I only ask because I rarely use anything other than Ash, Oak and Mahogany (African not south American which is tooo expensive!) but have been thinking lately that some Beech might be nice.

Any advice would be gratefully received

Cheers

Tony
 

kityuser

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Mrs kityuser seems to REALLY like the beech door.

Does seem a bit heavy though, what hinges do people suggest??
 

johnjin

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Hi Kityuser

Yeah I think you are right about the weight.
I was looking at the relative weights of different woods yesterday and believe it or not Beech is about as heavy as it goes. I had always believed that teak was the heavy wood but beech beats it hands down. In the list I was looking at nothing was heavier than beech and only one other wood that I had never heard of was the same weight.

Best Wishes

John

I like Beech
 

Chris Knight

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kit,
The door looks great - I can understand the missus likes it. As such it surely deserves a decent hinge and for me there is only one answer and that is a nice brass butt hinge. Make a small jig as per Jeff Greef's instructions and they are not difficult to fit.

If you are concerned about screws holding in the chipboard, then I guess the Euro 35mm hinges found in 99.999% of kitchens everywhere are the answer.
 

Aragorn

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I use hinges that have a ball bearing mechanism. The action is delightfully smooth and they're resistant to the kind of sticking that tends to happen with regular butts in time. Available in 3" and 4" in chrome finish, stainless finish, brushed stainless and brass.
I buy them from my local hardware store and imagine they are readily availalbe, but if you need more info, I'm sure I can find out from the owner.
Three of these on the door would work a charm!
 

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