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Help for new guy and beeswax problem

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Scouser

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Hello all

I have been playing with some reclaimed scaffold boards and made myself a bed. I used a belt sander to smooth the surface before finishing with coloured beeswax.

I put 1 coat on this morning, the wax was very thick but I left for around 30 mins before buffing.... ok so far. I melted the wax this evening (put tin into hot water) and then brushed on another coat. 20 mins later I am giving a gentle buff and the second coat is patchy. Im thinking I haven't left enough time between coats.

What is the best way to fix this, Can I use a spirit of some kind to take back the second coat of wax and then re-apply?

Also. i have noticed that the wax, even after a few weeks still keeps a slight waxy feel, does beeswax not harden? what other potions are their in terms of wax?

Thanks
 

marcros

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beeswax is very soft. It is generally mixed with carnauba wax to make it harder- the more carbauba wax the harder it is.
 

CHJ

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You may be seeing the results of different absorption levels in the wood, where the soft wax has penetrated deeper. This may have resulted in the surface hardening but trapping softer wax still containing solvents underneath, producing a blotchy appearance.
Normally wood is sealed before applying a wax.
This provides a hard constant skin that needs only a very thin layer of wax applied to it to form the shine.
 

Scouser

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Thanks lads

CHJ, what is it sealed with. I thought a sealer would stop the wood soaking the wax
 

CHJ

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Scouser":11md4wsl said:
Thanks lads

CHJ, what is it sealed with.
Google Sanding Sealer

Three common types are:
1. Cellulose sanding sealer, clear, dries quickly and forms a firm skin.
2. Acrylic sanding sealer, water based, a little slower to dry.
3. Shellac sanding sealer, meths based and a well tried formula, the basis of French polishing.

One suppliers versions here there are many other suppliers of equivalent products.

Scouser":11md4wsl said:
I thought a sealer would stop the wood soaking the wax
That is the point of using them, unless you want to really saturate wood in beeswax, such as a liquid holding vessel you only want the wax to form a thin film on the surface.

If you want a finish that penetrates the wood to give it in depth protection, enhance the grain structure and form a surface sheen then an oil would be more appropriate. Searching the above referenced site will give you some examples of suitable oils.
 
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