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Handed-ness of doors

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Woody2Shoes

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I remember reading somewhere that Sarah Beeny, bless her, always gets internal doors re-hung on period properties, as the old way of hanging them was to maximise the 'modesty' of those in the room, whereas the new way is to make best use of space and light without caring about such old-fashioned notions.

I wonder if there are any conventions - old or new - regarding external, front doors as to which side the hinges go on?

Cheers, W2S
 

AndyT

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A quick image search suggests that front doors can be either way round:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=front+door&t= ... &ia=images

I'd just add that in a terrace, with neighbouring houses built as mirror image pairs, the front doors will (usually?) be a sociable mirror pair. That way, if both are in use at the same time, the residents can talk to each other without being hidden from each other behind their doors.
 

MikeG.

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Woody2Shoes":130ue99p said:
I remember reading somewhere that Sarah Beeny, bless her, always gets internal doors re-hung on period properties, as the old way of hanging them was to maximise the 'modesty' of those in the room, whereas the new way is to make best use of space and light without caring about such old-fashioned notions.

I wonder if there are any conventions - old or new - regarding external, front doors as to which side the hinges go on?

Cheers, W2S
Sarah Beeney is dead right, for once, but mainly for Victorian/ Edwardian era houses, where the concern was that servants could enter a room unexpectedly and catch the occupants up to something they shouldn't be doing.

The logic with front doors, which always open in, is that they should open in such a way as to cause the least obstruction for people entering the house.
 

SBJ

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Woody2Shoes":33xe8v1w said:
I remember reading somewhere that Sarah Beeny, bless her, always gets internal doors re-hung on period properties, as the old way of hanging them was to maximise the 'modesty' of those in the room, whereas the new way is to make best use of space and light without caring about such old-fashioned notions.

I wonder if there are any conventions - old or new - regarding external, front doors as to which side the hinges go on?

Cheers, W2S

Front doors usually open in and there's normally a 'common sense' way for them the be hung. Stairs, cupboards, traffic flow, other doors usually determine what is most appropriate. As mentioned, in terraces, doors are often seen as pairs and that might also dictate the handedness of them. As far as I know, there are no hard and fast rules for it though.
 

Mike Jordan

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The convention is to hang the door to cloak the room when opened, not a frequent question since the light switch is normally placed in such a position that reversing the door would cause inconvenience. My servants are very discrete as well.
 

MikeG.

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Mike Jordan":35qe0789 said:
The convention is to hang the door to cloak the room when opened.........
No. That was the convention. It hasn't been the convention for donkeys years now.
 

Woody2Shoes

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MikeG.":fw6609vo said:
Woody2Shoes":fw6609vo said:
I remember reading somewhere that Sarah Beeny, bless her, always gets internal doors re-hung on period properties, as the old way of hanging them was to maximise the 'modesty' of those in the room, whereas the new way is to make best use of space and light without caring about such old-fashioned notions.

I wonder if there are any conventions - old or new - regarding external, front doors as to which side the hinges go on?

Cheers, W2S
Sarah Beeney is dead right, for once, but mainly for Victorian/ Edwardian era houses, where the concern was that servants could enter a room unexpectedly and catch the occupants up to something they shouldn't be doing.

The logic with front doors, which always open in, is that they should open in such a way as to cause the least obstruction for people entering the house.
Servants.... I'm not sure my house was built, in the Edwardian era, for a high enough status of person - maybe my doors are simply done the 'modest' way because the chippy (who signed and dated the outside of the door frame 110+ years ago) was used/trained to do them that way. That said, I think it's fair to say that previous generations expected to fit more people into a given amount of housing - whether or not they were paid (in cash/kind) to be there. I know that my house started off with two families of farm labourers living in it. Modern households tend to be smaller numerically as well as physically.
 

sunnybob

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Back in the day... Front doors opened inwards and the hinge was on the left because the owner then had his sword or pistol in his right hand ready to kill whoever was knocking if he so deemed it necessary.
Similarly, internal doors were handed so that an intruder had his right hand occupied with the handle, putting him at a disadvantage to the rooms occupants.
Left handers were not taken into consideration as they were the work of the devil.

You lot have all gone soft (hammer) (hammer) (hammer)
 

shed9

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We have a fairly old factory (150+) that we are perpetually converting into a home . When my father in law turned up at an early stage the first thing he noted was the doors were hung the wrong way around. Other than the bathrooms he had no substantive answer to back this up, it was just wrong to him. Clearly it's now mostly a generational notion.
Personally other than opening onto a WC I'd say it's what ever makes best use of space and is the more practical for each respective space.
 

Woody2Shoes

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sunnybob":kv8rjdfi said:
Back in the day... Front doors opened inwards and the hinge was on the left because the owner then had his sword or pistol in his right hand ready to kill whoever was knocking if he so deemed it necessary.
Similarly, internal doors were handed so that an intruder had his right hand occupied with the handle, putting him at a disadvantage to the rooms occupants.
Left handers were not taken into consideration as they were the work of the devil.

You lot have all gone soft (hammer) (hammer) (hammer)
I suppose it all 'hinges' on which 'left' you're talking about....... :lol: And you've ignored left-footers....
 

sunnybob

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Woody2Shoes":1uedsoab said:
sunnybob":1uedsoab said:
Back in the day... Front doors opened inwards and the hinge was on the left because the owner then had his sword or pistol in his right hand ready to kill whoever was knocking if he so deemed it necessary.
Similarly, internal doors were handed so that an intruder had his right hand occupied with the handle, putting him at a disadvantage to the rooms occupants.
Left handers were not taken into consideration as they were the work of the devil.

You lot have all gone soft (hammer) (hammer) (hammer)
I suppose it all 'hinges' on which 'left' you're talking about....... :lol: And you've ignored left-footers....
Theres a good reason that the Latin word for "left" is SINISTER
:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
 

MikeG.

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Woody2Shoes":3skvqymn said:
MikeG.":3skvqymn said:
shed9":3skvqymn said:
...... other than opening onto a WC..........
If it downstairs, and the building is subject to building control, then the door must open out.
Is that (only) Part M ?
I think so. To be honest, I've been drawing outward opening loo doors for 15 or 20 years, so I haven't checked for a very long time. There is also a requirement for a clear space in front of the toilet bowl which catches many people out.
 

Woody2Shoes

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MikeG.":2cirwivw said:
I think so. To be honest, I've been drawing outward opening loo doors for 15 or 20 years, so I haven't checked for a very long time. There is also a requirement for a clear space in front of the toilet bowl which catches many people out.
I'm ashamed to admit that lack of clear space in front of the bowl has caught me out in the past! :lol:
 

OscarG

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sunnybob":c2qronct said:
Theres a good reason that the Latin word for "left" is SINISTER
:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
Yep, to my amusement I discovered that left is sinistra when learning a bit of Italian a few years back. 8)
 
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