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ankledeep

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Now look what you lot have gone and done

I was a dedicated "machine user" who ownes a single plane that did anything and everything...a record no 4

I have since joining here aquired a marples no 5 1/2
and today SWMBO bought me an early b'day pressie......a stanley No 7

I also have, and had little interest beyond "oh thats nice" a wooden coffin? plane...with no makers mark, in fact NO mark on it

I will post pics, when my camera stops being stroppy about low charge in battery.
the record isnt particularly old as these things go i suspect, but its in good nick, the marples is covered in oily goo...which is not imo a bad thing for the moment, but under it is some of the original? red paint and the clover leaf design badge is still on the top of the rear handle. The stanly is in good fettle to my untrained eye, though if there was any design on the cap iron its been worn away by over zealous cleaning, likewise the iron appears to have had most of its markings removed. I am assured that this is a number 7 of 7/8 design, and is a low knob design (ooooer)
All of these however appear to be nice and flat with no discernable bowing, cupping or twist in the soles, which I assume is a GOOD thing?

only one query atm.....the mouth on the stanley is very tight. Do i lossen the two screws on the frog (it is a pre adjust type) and move it back a bit, and if so...how much is a "bit"?
 

David C

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No need for it to be wider than the thickest shaving you wish to pass through it.

David
 

Cheshirechappie

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Just to add to what David has (quite correctly) said; the 'classic' set-ups for the planes you have are to have the jack -the 5 1/2 - set coarse, with an open mouth and an iron sharpened to a curve - up to about 1/16" - and used as the primary waste-shifter, then to follow with the try plane (number 7) set tight and with an iron sharpened almost square across to true-up (or 'try') the surface once the jack has done the heavy waste-shifting. The little feller, the number 4, should also be set fine with a tight mouth, and used for final fitting of components and for final finishing of show surfaces. The smoother usually has the iron sharpened almost square across, but with the corners 'eased' so that it doesn't leave track-marks on the surface.

The reason for this sequence is that the jack, having a slightly curved iron, will leave a furrowed surface, which the try plane will flatten out. The try plane is long, so that it bridges over hollows and just takes off humps to leave the surface 'tried and true'.

Give 'em a try-out. If you hit any snags, bung a question on here and answers will undoubtedly be forthcoming!
 

Cheshirechappie

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matthewwh":18ivo3c8 said:
Cheshirechappie":18ivo3c8 said:
'tried and true'.
I had no idea that was the origin of the expression but it makes perfect sense. Thank you.
It's a great place for picking up information, this forum. In the short time I've been here, I've gained no end of hints, tips, snippets and knowledge. If I've managed to contribute a bit as well, that's a bonus.
 

Benchwayze

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Cheshirechappie":1i5hkn8k said:
Just to add to what David has (quite correctly) said; the 'classic' set-ups for the planes you have are to have the jack -the 5 1/2 - set coarse, with an open mouth and an iron sharpened to a curve - up to about 1/16" - and used as the primary waste-shifter, then to follow with the try plane (number 7) set tight and with an iron sharpened almost square across to true-up (or 'try') the surface once the jack has done the heavy waste-shifting. The little feller, the number 4, should also be set fine with a tight mouth, and used for final fitting of components and for final finishing of show surfaces. The smoother usually has the iron sharpened almost square across, but with the corners 'eased' so that it doesn't leave track-marks on the surface.

The reason for this sequence is that the jack, having a slightly curved iron, will leave a furrowed surface, which the try plane will flatten out. The try plane is long, so that it bridges over hollows and just takes off humps to leave the surface 'tried and true'.

Give 'em a try-out. If you hit any snags, bung a question on here and answers will undoubtedly be forthcoming!
But then...
I like to feel the small 'waves' left by a curved iron. (And I mean small) All my planes have some kind of lateral curve to their edge. I f I don't I find I can't avoid leaving tramlines. 'Scuffing ' the corners, just leaves scuff-marks. So I induce a curve. The plane I use for diagonal quick-removal has the most noticeable curve.

My try-plane will true an edge lengthways, of course because of its sole length; at the same time, I can't see how you can flatten and square edge with a straight honed blade. At least not using the procedure I use to get an edge square.

Maybe it's just me. :D
 

David C

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John,

Agreed. Wearing shows the method for squaring an edge with a cambered blade.
A technique which seems to have escaped Hampton, "Planecraft". I believe he was a plane salesman.....

Best wishes,
David Charlesworth
 

Benchwayze

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David C":3almfgez said:
John,

Agreed. Wearing shows the method for squaring an edge with a cambered blade.
A technique which seems to have escaped Hampton, "Planecraft". I believe he was a plane salesman.....

Best wishes,
David Charlesworth
Cheers David.
It certainly didn't escape my Woodwork teacher at school, although it took a while for it to sink in... I have it now though! :D :D
 

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