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custard

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transatlantic":1i13z12t said:
What do you think?
I think the internet is actually a pretty poor resource for woodworkers, spreading as much disinformation, fallacies, and prejudice as it does hard facts.

I watched the first twenty seconds of this video and that was enough. This guy is just an armchair warrior trying to maximise his Youtube exposure, hence his hysterically indignant and sensationalist tone.

If I thought there was anything in his comments I'd first of all repeat his tests so I could see for myself, but to be honest I can't be bothered. To paraphrase Jay-Z, "I've got 99 problems but gap filling glues ain't one of them"!
 

thetyreman

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transatlantic":3r5r77go said:
What do you think?
try it for yourself, do your own tests and experiments. Personally I'd rather be making something or learning a new joint or skill, or improving my existing skills, tighter joints means less glue needed.
 
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thetyreman":25842uk5 said:
transatlantic":25842uk5 said:
What do you think?
try it for yourself, do your own tests and experiments. Personally I'd rather be making something or learning a new joint or skill, or improving my existing skills, tighter joints means less glue needed.
This all cropped up due to my latest project. A picture frame (about 600mm square). It is the first time I have gone from rough sawn boards (American White Oak) to a finished item. Unfortunately, I didn't quite get the milling right, and ended up with a bit of twist (I know what I did wrong), which resulted in some gappy mitres.

Wanting to still complete the project, I ended up doing the glue up with 30 minute epoxy. Which was a bit of a nightmare, as I needed to lay it flat, but then epoxy was getting everywhere, as well as me risking gluing the frame to my bench!

Not something I would try again. I think next time I'll try CA glue, and then some splines.
 

Bodgers

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marcros":7iflicjt said:
CA wouldn't be a good choice here.
Yep. Strength aside, given practically zero open time and no ability to reposition anything, it would be complete nightmare.



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woodbloke66

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custard":o4ajqw4c said:
transatlantic":o4ajqw4c said:
What do you think?
I think the internet is actually a pretty poor resource for woodworkers, spreading as much disinformation, fallacies, and prejudice as it does hard facts.

I watched the first twenty seconds of this video and that was enough. This guy is just an armchair warrior trying to maximise his Youtube exposure, hence his hysterically indignant and sensationalist tone.
Yep, usual Utoob t'internet dross. I'm surprised you managed twenty seconds Custard, I clicked away after ten - Rob
 

woodbloke66

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transatlantic":2vhwvk7c said:
This all cropped up due to my latest project. A picture frame (about 600mm square). It is the first time I have gone from rough sawn boards (American White Oak) to a finished item. Unfortunately, I didn't quite get the milling right, and ended up with a bit of twist (I know what I did wrong), which resulted in some gappy mitres.

Wanting to still complete the project, I ended up doing the glue up with 30 minute epoxy. Which was a bit of a nightmare, as I needed to lay it flat, but then epoxy was getting everywhere, as well as me risking gluing the frame to my bench!

Not something I would try again. I think next time I'll try CA glue, and then some splines.
I'd suggest the next time, you get the frame absolutely spot on, especially with something that big. If it's the slightest bit out of kilter, you're liable to crack the glass and if it's the 'clarity' non-reflective sort (highly recommended) you could be (for that size) £200+ down - Rob
 
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woodbloke66":2x1785zj said:
transatlantic":2x1785zj said:
This all cropped up due to my latest project. A picture frame (about 600mm square). It is the first time I have gone from rough sawn boards (American White Oak) to a finished item. Unfortunately, I didn't quite get the milling right, and ended up with a bit of twist (I know what I did wrong), which resulted in some gappy mitres.

Wanting to still complete the project, I ended up doing the glue up with 30 minute epoxy. Which was a bit of a nightmare, as I needed to lay it flat, but then epoxy was getting everywhere, as well as me risking gluing the frame to my bench!

Not something I would try again. I think next time I'll try CA glue, and then some splines.
I'd suggest the next time, you get the frame absolutely spot on, especially with something that big. If it's the slightest bit out of kilter, you're liable to crack the glass and if it's the 'clarity' non-reflective sort (highly recommended) you could be (for that size) £200+ down - Rob
Crack the glass? I'm not going to try and force the glass in if thats what you mean. It'll just sit in the rebate as is.
 

woodbloke66

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phil.p":188ut327 said:
No, he means the frame is likely to wind and crack the glass.
That's it; when the frame is in wind, the bottom of the rebate where the glass sits isn't dead level. As a consequence, your'e liable to crack the glass when the pic is assembled - Rob
 
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