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Fireplace surround

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Anonymous

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I am having an old stone fireplace removed and a new multi-fuel stove installed. I have designed a new fire surround to an art deco design, and wish to build from wood.
Obviously the new stove will radiate a great deal of heat, so I am seeking advice... which wood should I choose?
My initial thoughts were beech or oak, but that was based purely on gut feel. Would these be suitable :?:
 
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Anonymous

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Hi - and welcome!

I put a woodstove into a fireplace a few years back and I remember the instructions that came with the stove said clearly that there should be no flammable materials within 24" of the front, back or sides and 30" of the top. That included wood. That was nearly 13 years ago and the stove was rated at 40,000 btu. I did break the rules a bit and there was wood 15" from the sides, but set back by about 6" from the front of the stove. Also, the oak mantlepiece was about 27" above the top - didn't seem to cause any problems.

As the heat output was so high we heated the house with it by running the stove in the famliy room downstairs and leaving all the doors open for the heat to rise. Used just one cord of wood to heat the house through a New England winter!
 
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Anonymous

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I guess what you are saying is that I can use any wood that I like as long as it is a sufficient distance from the heat source; that distance being specified in the instructions from the fire supplier.
 

Adam

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davejester":onkputan said:
Hi,

I've just moved into a house with a charnwood solid fuel fireplace in the front room. I've been surprised about how little heat is given out into the room. It is obviously designed to give as much heat to heating the water as possible (it runs our heating and hot water supply).

Not sure who you've bought your stove from but might be worth checking with them before making any assumptions about heat output to the room.

Dave
My uncle has just been through the same process - he wanted a wooden beam over - but couldn't position it in accordance with fireregs - so use a temporary metal beam, until the building inspector signed it off - then removed it and popped a wooden beam in it's place. I know this is a bit dodgy - but all over the country are pubs with open fireplaces (not even the protection a wooden burning stove provides) and they invariably have an oak beam over them. I think this is another case of bureaucrats sticking their oar in.

Adam
 
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Anonymous

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Adam: I think this is another case of bureaucrats sticking their oar in
Hmmm. I wouldn't mess around and ignore fire regs, personally. :shock: Has your uncle informed his insurance company that he is non-compliant with the regulations? If not, I suspect his policy (if he has one) will be invalidated in case of fire. Just remember that your car insurance is invalid if you fail to notify them of ANYTHING that THEY deem relevant...

Gorsian: distance being specified in the instructions from the fire supplier
In my opinion, I would think that as long as you install it according to manufacturer's specifications you should be all right. After all, they're not allowed to sell you something that is non-compliant. I'm not a lawyer, though.
 

ike

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My initial thoughts were beech or oak, but that was based purely on gut feel. Would these be suitable
I'd say any timber that is more dense and less resinous would be preferable - so almost any hardwood that takes your fancy. I was looking to see if there are any flame retardant finishes (i.e. varnishes) for timber, but it wasn't conclusive.

I know you aren't querying the design of your surround, but I'll just echo Brians comment about insurance cover - extremely valid point. A compliant design won't cost a penny more.

cheers

Ike
 

Adam

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White House Workshop":26811dxq said:
Hmmm. I wouldn't mess around and ignore fire regs,
Problem is, each building inspector interpreted them differently. One said that all the smoke alarms had to be hardwired together (this is a domestic property). So he had to have a sparky back at quite a cost to do this as by now, all the ceilings were installed. The guy who signed it off wasn't the least bit interested (said it was fine either way).

Similarly, the windows were deemed too high (it's a barn conversion). So a step had to be made at the base of every window. Again, the next guy said it was fine as it was - and the regs didn't require a step at all.

Adam
 

Bean

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scouting about
This is the problem with building work. I am making a small alteration to a porch, as its at the front I need planning permission, one say as it is not structural it can be handled under a building notice the next wants a full set of drawings, you cannot win...........Jobsworths :roll:

Bean
 
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Anonymous

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Well gentlefolk,
Thanks for all of the advice. I am eager to ensure safety and compliance (knowing that Insurance companies will do anything to avoid paying... !), so I will await the actual installation before I make a final decision on design/material.
Thanks again
 
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