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Fingernail Gouge grinding Jig

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CHJ

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Objective:
1. To make a Fingernail Gouge grinding Jig

Reasons:
1. A need to produce an acceptable grinding result on the basis that I keep making a hash of freehand grinding this form.
2. The cost of commercial units will be better spent on improved quality Grinding wheels.

Design criteria:
1. To provide the equivalent function of the commercial units.
2. To do it with components/materials readily available in a wood shop.

Materials used:
1. 4 pieces of Beech of 19 X 38 mm section.
2. 2 X 6 mm threaded inserts.
3. 90 X 80 X 3 mm metal plate.
4. 4 small wood screws
5. 6 mm. Studding, nuts (3) Nylock nut, washer
6. 6 mm clamping Knob from unused grinder rest bracket.
7. 8mm Coach Bolt nut & washer.



Component parts.


The two main sub assemblies.



The finished Jig with gouge fitted for trial run.



The result of the first grinding run. I am reasonably satisfied with Jig performance on first run; hopefully finer stones to come will up the finish
level.




Some points on construction to note:

The two sketches below give a guide to dimensions and setup, the dimensions are not super critical as the final angle of grind is dependant on user setup, the distance between the Pivot Rod hole centre and the Gouge hole centre govern the curvature of the ‘fingernail’. The 120 deg. Angle of the Pivot Rod puts the Gouge wheel approach angle in the correct “ball park” so to speak.



My one and only finger gouge is 7/16” diameter and I made the hole to fit.
The 6mm studding is locked to the Gouge Clamp Block with a nut.
The Studding (Pivot Rod) is free to swing in the lower block.

Guidance notes will give a pilot hole size for the Thread Inserts somewhat smaller than you will need for use in Beech (I taper drilled mine in steps from 7.5 -9mm)

I have found it prudent to fit a locking nut to the Gouge clamp screw assembly which is tweaked up after thumb tightening gouge in situ. I
rounded the clamp screw inner end to match the Gouge inner face

To set up:

Determine the height of the mounting relative to the grinder and check that the Centreline of the Gouge locating hole is at or above the Grinding Wheel Centre Line when positioned as per sketch.

Fit Gouge to jig with approx 2” (50mm) protruding on Wheel side.

WITH GRINDER STATIONARY. Position and secure base adjacent to grinder and offer Gouge up to wheel. Adjust the temp 2” extension (in or out) until the Gouge face to be ground is sitting on the wheel at the correct angle.

Swing the pivot from side to side to check that the gouge remains in contact with the wheel (if jig or lower pivot block is to far to one side gouge may not stay in contact)
Check that the jig does not foul grinder casing or guards.

Withdraw Gouge on pivot and switch on grinder.
Start with Gouge fully to one side and offer up to wheel, with hand on Gouge handle and a finger resting on top of Gouge near the handle side of jig clamp and with Light Pressure only, rock the jig from one side to the other until you have a continuous facet across the back face of the Gouge.

Observations
Only improvement that is immediately obvious is to the Pivot Rod, think it would benefit from the fitting of Pivot Rod with a Plain lower portion

(will try modified long coach bolt with increased thread length as soon as I can procure) or larger diameter bush to improve stability
 
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Anonymous

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Nice and clear with instructions too 8)
...might try making one ... on the tuit list :)

A modified drill bit grinding jig from Axminster gives a passable grind with wings
 

UKTony

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Fantastic.......Looks better than the £50.00 i spent on a Sorby


I have the same Grinder, if you get round to changing wheels to Pink for example keep us posted

Tony
 

CHJ

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UKTony":4l6mgecf said:
Fantastic.......Looks better than the £50.00 i spent on a Sorby

I have the same Grinder, if you get round to changing wheels to Pink for example keep us posted

Tony
Well I must admit to seeing an advert for the Sorby when browsing in Smiths.
Looked up the price when I got home and decided that an afternoon checking out the geometry and putting it together suited my pocket more.

Will do on the wheel front, am going with either the pink or blue from Peter Child, maybe both as I have cheap wet & dry from same stable and can put a better wheel on both. It will have to wait till I get back from trip abroad. Need to dismantle both to check exact details of spindle extension and casing clearances.

Need also to check if you can get enough travel across a 20 mm wheel for a finger gouge grind. Edit: (You can if careful. ) May fit recessed 25mm to one of them. EDIT: Blue do not come in other than 20mm as far as I can see :cry: :cry: strike that, they do come in 150mm X 25mm recessed and have aquired such.

Edit: Details of Blue Stone fitting to Grinder.
 
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Anonymous

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Chas

That is exactly what I have been thinking I needed this week after my recent bowl turing escapades. Thanks for the info, I should be making one this weekend :wink:
 

CHJ

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Tony":2w74tfo4 said:
Chas

That is exactly what I have been thinking I needed this week after my recent bowl turing escapades. Thanks for the info, I should be making one this weekend :wink:
Glad to input something useful into the kitty, do you think we ought to get a forum Logo for Jigs and Tools developed here?

A sort of Own Brand to go with all the LN & Festool stuff :lol:
 

Aragorn

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Welcome Joe!
Pictures work fine for me...
Shame. I like a mystery :wink:
 

Chris Knight

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Chas,

Another super one!

Joe, the pictures were not showing earlier today but now are - temporary glitch on Chas's server I guess.
 

CHJ

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waterhead37":1rs75mj5 said:
Chas,

Another super one!

Joe, the pictures were not showing earlier today but now are - temporary glitch on Chas's server I guess.
Thanks Chris for your response (correct) to Joe, I was in transit to Bavaria
 
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Anonymous

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Hi Chas,

thought I'd resurrect a very old thread. I've done a good job of grinding most of a bowl gouge into tiny pieces over the past couple of days. The jig a made had a few conceptual floors.

I notice from your jig that the angle of the tool holder in relation to the threaded rod is fixed. Looking at the Tormek and Sorby jigs this angle can be changed. Is the changeable angle required?

Think I'll start making one of these tonight. I've actually learned quite a lot about turning in the process of trying to make a jig (and messing up a bowl gouge).

Cheers,

Dave
 

CHJ

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davejester":13wd5xpb said:
.........
I notice from your jig that the angle of the tool holder in relation to the threaded rod is fixed. Looking at the Tormek and Sorby jigs this angle can be changed. Is the changeable angle required? .......
Hi Dave, It's a bit like how long is a piece of string. It all depends on how varied you wish to profile the wings of your gouges.

Some people stick with a set angle and vary the distance of the jig mounting from the wheel to achieve a differing bevel angle across all their gouges.
This one was my first attempt and was used mainly for my spindle gouge.

If you want to achieve the variations seen in the Tormek Guide then you will need a variable jig head angle and a variable jig support distance from the wheel as provided with the Tormek or Sorby jig and various others. (Note: the Tormek standard jig settings only achieve two profiles the rest are down to user made setting aids)

My current preferred jigis a variation of the Sorby as is the oneMade by santiniuk

Unfortunately I do not have dimensions to hand but santiniuk may have made a note of them.
 
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Anonymous

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Hi Chas,

cheers for the info. I'll have a think about how best to achieve the adjustable angle. I'm not so good with the metal work so I think I'll stick to mainly wood for now. I'm sure I can modify what I've done already to create a new improved jig (which works).

I've found one of the big advantages to creating my own jig is that I understand how it works properly. I've met people who've bought jigs but can never get a good grind out of them. As well as that I find it fun just tinkering in the workshop (especially since I got loads more space).

Cheers,

Dave
 

CHJ

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One of the main things to do whatever form of jig you use, once you have a setting you are happy with is to make up some simple setting gauges for angles and distances out of a bit of scrap MDF or similar, mark gouge name and setting details on them.

Then resetting jig each time is easy and repeatable without worrying about angles etc.

 
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