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DIY shed build; plans and likely costs

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m1ke_a

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Folks

I posted an earlier thread about buying a new shed but am wondering whether DIY is going to be viable.

TBH I'm likely to stick with getting one made to order for speed and convenience but could anyone help with the following questions?

Shed dimensions 12' wide apex X 16' long

Can you get shiplap in 16' lengths?
Would it be necessary to have pressure treated / tanalised wood for the frame, trusses etc?
Tongue and groove the floor and ceiling?
Worth hiring a nail gun for the assembly?
Any UK sources of shed plans? I'm actually in New England at the mo, which has a big tradition of wood building and interweb searches are leaning to US specific styles.
Supplier recommendations and likely costs, especially if anyone knows any good Sussex based ones.

Thanks v much

Mike
 

buffalobill

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If you use pressuretreatet for the mudsill you will do just fine, is better not use pressuretreatet for the studs and the rooftruses.
I dont think i would rent any nailgun just for a small shed but if you dont like the hammer is better with a gun and ofcourse is faster..
 

Shultzy

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Mike, check out some of the workshop builds. Mine was made from shiplap and it came in various lengths some were over and some were under 16ft. Check with your preferred supplier to see what they use. I would try and hire a nail gun as there are a lot of nails to hammer in. I bought one as this was cheaper than hiring for the length of time I wanted it.
 

m1ke_a

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Shultzy

I've just gone through your excellent workshop build and you've convinced me to not to DIY! Don't get me wrong, you did a cracking job but you've confirmed in my mind that a full DIY project will take a lot of time and effort.

Had I an alternate storage place then I would DIY so consequently I shall go with a prefab and Passmores have been recommended to me.

Question with DPC lining

What's the best way to line the interior prior to insulation and boarding over? Tyvek, poly sheet, A N Other? I presume there's no issue with filling the frame voids with rocslab/wool /celotex and then putting the membrane over that before boarding over?
 

Shultzy

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Mike, sorry my shed build put you off building your own shed but it has at least warned of the problems. One of the issues with buying a shed is the frame size. You really want 4x2 to give enough depth for the insulation. Make sure that the shed you buy has a building paper membrane between the outer skin and the frame. Then fill with your preferred insulation, membrane then board over.
 

jmc67

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buffalobill":2ase12b3 said:
If you use pressuretreatet for the mudsill you will do just fine, is better not use pressuretreatet for the studs and the rooftruses.
I dont think i would rent any nailgun just for a small shed but if you dont like the hammer is better with a gun and ofcourse is faster..
Out of interest, why advise against pressure treated for the studs, and roof trusses? I'm going to be a building a shed soon, so am just drawing up a parts list and assumed that I would just use pressure treated throughout...
 

m1ke_a

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Shultzy":2otehksa said:
Mike, sorry my shed build put you off building your own shed but it has at least warned of the problems. One of the issues with buying a shed is the frame size. You really want 4x2 to give enough depth for the insulation. Make sure that the shed you buy has a building paper membrane between the outer skin and the frame. Then fill with your preferred insulation, membrane then board over.
Shultzy

Thanks very much for your thoughts and there's absolutely no need to apologise on your part. I'd previously said I knew that a DIY build would take me ages and some of the hurdles you faced (including weather) confirmed that I simply wouldn't have the time, storage facilities or indeed commitment to complete a build in a reasonable amount of time.

(I strongly suspect a basic interior board out with no insulation is probably going to take me over a week of actual time.)

I'm back home now so will follow up with Passmores et al to see what they say about lining the frame prior to cladding. As to the insulation, I could retro fit additional framing myself to increase the depth.
 

scott25

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Hi mike dont be put off building your own shed i built my brother a gym in the bottom off the garden which is the same size as yours 13ftx16ft deep i put french doors in the front and upvc window it has cctv and fredland alarm too all in i would say it cost £2500 at the most not which the bits he puttin in the gym i would say the shed it self was £1000 for wood flet screws nails etc electric cable fuse box and the price off a sparky to connect to thee cu in the house i started it on 11 nov just dooin saturdays and work all over the xmas holidays and i finished on 5 fed it all plasterboarded ect i will get some pics up as i had a lot off head echs trust like moveing 10tons off mud and rubble i would always build my own which is wot am planing at the mo mine is goin to be 12x8 but not a full build just extending my old shed

good luck with the project look in the for sale ads on hire i have 44ft off 4mm 3core swa cable and glandsand cleats too mite be off help to u and it will keep the cost down
 

kirkpoore1

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jmc67":37siwiqs said:
Out of interest, why advise against pressure treated for the studs, and roof trusses? I'm going to be a building a shed soon, so am just drawing up a parts list and assumed that I would just use pressure treated throughout...
Pressure treated wood is needed when the wood will likely get wet, like when it's sitting in contact with the foundation. If your studs and trusses are getting wet, you've got leaks that will be doing a lot more damage than just to the frame. If your shed is properly constructed so you don't have leaks, the extra money you spend on the PT wood will be wasted. In addition, you need to use special coated nails on some types of PT wood to keep the chemical from corroding the nail.

Kirk
 

m1ke_a

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Decided not to DIY and took the plunge with Passmores earlier. A lot cheaper than the local firms but the spec may not be quite as high.

Once I've got a decent size shop up I can start tinkering with the interior and improving things like the doors.

Does anyone have any experience with caisson work? The bottom of the garden drops down to a little stream and I could 'claim back' another 5 - 6 foot of space if I could level things off.

A deck might be the easiest thing to construct but I do like the idea of hardcore filled caisson cages. They should be a bit more durable.

Mike
 

jmc67

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kirkpoore1":3o59p9nv said:
jmc67":3o59p9nv said:
Out of interest, why advise against pressure treated for the studs, and roof trusses? I'm going to be a building a shed soon, so am just drawing up a parts list and assumed that I would just use pressure treated throughout...
Pressure treated wood is needed when the wood will likely get wet, like when it's sitting in contact with the foundation. If your studs and trusses are getting wet, you've got leaks that will be doing a lot more damage than just to the frame. If your shed is properly constructed so you don't have leaks, the extra money you spend on the PT wood will be wasted. In addition, you need to use special coated nails on some types of PT wood to keep the chemical from corroding the nail.

Kirk
Thanks for clarifying that - and apologies for the temporary thread hijack..
 

Shultzy

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Mike, is the stream in your garden? If so you could culvert it.
I assume the caisson cages are another name for gabions. We have just finished a line of these at our canal restoration site. If you want more info let me know.
 

buffalobill

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jmc67":3d91pyxq said:
buffalobill":3d91pyxq said:
If you use pressuretreatet for the mudsill you will do just fine, is better not use pressuretreatet for the studs and the rooftruses.
I dont think i would rent any nailgun just for a small shed but if you dont like the hammer is better with a gun and ofcourse is faster..
Out of interest, why advise against pressure treated for the studs, and roof trusses? I'm going to be a building a shed soon, so am just drawing up a parts list and assumed that I would just use pressure treated throughout...
Depends a bit of what type of shed you are building but i see many of the sheds here on the forum get insulation and cladding on the inside the pt lumber contain a lot of water wich will use a lot of time to dry before you can put your moistbarrier/plastic. Do this before the lumber is dry and you get problems.
If you are buidling a shed and maybe want to insulate it you are wasting your money on pt lumber in my eyes, what are they protecting? arent the wall supossed to be dry and the roof not leaking.??
Another thing is quality of the materials, i dont know how it is in uk but here is better quality in un treated wood, and is much lighter to work with a 2x4 untreated is half the weight at least feel that way.
But as they mention here if you use it for a subfloor or something in contact with the ground or exposed for weather is best to go for pt.

good luck with the shed and excuse my english
 

m1ke_a

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Shultzy":2ar9ewn8 said:
Mike, is the stream in your garden? If so you could culvert it.
I assume the caisson cages are another name for gabions. We have just finished a line of these at our canal restoration site. If you want more info let me know.
Doh! Thanks Shultzy, gabions is the word I was after. Now you've put me on the right path I've found Burdens who have a local depot.

Shall I start a new thread on gabions or PM you to take this conversation off line?
 

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