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Rikyrik81

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Hi im joiner but setting up a second workshop at home and will do cabinets/furniture only. Im wondering if theres a good book out there that i may reference if needed.

While im here i want to ask about backs of cabinets, i make backs out of solid wood around 8-10mm thick as i want quality the highest priority. What is the reason for t&g as alot of people seem to do that, if its because the surface area is small to glue i find no issue or am i missing something?
Anyway
Thanks
 

marcros

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Joyce is probably a good starting point for books, along with something that gives you the standard dimensions for people and furniture- table heights, seat heights etc.

I presume that t and g is to allow for some movement in solid wood.
 

Rikyrik81

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Thanks for the speedy response, i will look that up.

I was wondering that too but not sure why the back would need to expand contract any more than the rest of the unit, also being internal and sealed?

Thanks again :D
 

Benchwayze

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Hi Rik,

+1 for Joyce
If it isn't in there then it's probably not worth knowing. 8)

As for the T&G back: The back is likely to be the largest expanse of timber in a project like a book case or wardrobe. If natural wood then it is quite likely to move. That's why you would be wise to coat the tongue and groove edges, prior to assembly, so movement doesn't show unfinished timber over the years. Also, I am assured, it's a good thing to make the back as a framed unit, settled in a rebate with 'room to rattle'!
 

Benchwayze

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You don't HAVE to use T&G, but at least make the back from framed panels for a good job. natural wood panels should not be glued in of course, or they will likely split over time!

John (hammer)
 

Mr T

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Joyce is my reference also, but I do find that it is getting a little dated, but I don't know of an up to date reference that is as comprehensive (not sure that makes sense!).

Chris
 

Benchwayze

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Chris,

I know what you mean, but in the end the kind of quality work many of us want to do is best accomplished by using traditional methods.

Modern materials, fastenings and adhesives have made a difference of course and in that area, new techniques have become possible. The Domino for instance; but it hasn't eliminated the 'real' mortice and tenon, any more than Leigh have got rid of dovetailing by hand. Time will tell if these modern things are long-lasting.

Even pocket-hole joinery and dowelling joints are developments from days gone by. Much use was made of both techniques in the construction of post-war 'Utility' furniture; I remember well the utility mark; two little Pac-Men side by side! I used screw pockets to fit block-board tops on some of my earlier projects from the 60s. I just didn't have a jig, other than the one I made myself from a scrap of oak.

Ergo, there ain't nothing new under the Sun!

Regards

John (hammer)
 

Benchwayze

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Ben,

I like the dovetailing on the shelf bracket.
I threw mine out the other day when I stripped down the wall, ready for a rethink!
Just a single tail though. Nothing quite as fancy as your design.

Cheers

John (hammer)
 

thetyreman

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Benchwayze":34aysk6z said:
Ben,

I like the dovetailing on the shelf bracket.
I threw mine out the other day when I stripped down the wall, ready for a rethink!
Just a single tail though. Nothing quite as fancy as your design.

Cheers

John (hammer)

hi, it's a paul sellers design from his woodworking masterclass one of the paid for projects on there, nothing wrong actually with a single dovetail, but one of the reasons for doing the project was to try making hounds tooth dovetail, thanks john

regards,

Ben.
 

Bod

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"Joyce"
The Technique of Furniture Making. By Ernest Joyce.
ISBN 0 7134 8814 X (4th edition, revised by Alan Peters)

Bod
 
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