Ancient Stihl chainsaw

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Noel

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
7 Aug 2003
Messages
6,992
Reaction score
427
Thought you might like to see what the beast (and his Hyundai baby brother) were chopping up this afternoon. The Hyundai was just for a branch which the cowboys who worked on our neighbour's trees had left hanging like a Sword of Damocles over our garden and which got dislodged by gales last night. Fortunately we were not out there at the time!
But it did remind me that last time I used the Stihl, I was younger, healthier and fitter.
View attachment 133279


Glad you got it all working.

KNYMtKt.jpg


056 AV Electronic. 83 manufacture, 87cc, 10kg.
 

dickm

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
164
Location
North of Aberdeen
Interesting pic, Noel. but those are only twigs!!
From the serial number, my 048 is supposed to be 1984, but your's looks newer. Been meaning to weigh mine; was wondering whether the 20" Hyundai people are mentioning might be significantly lighter and so more suitable for an oldie.
Will check the filter, Gingerbloke. Never noticed a problem there, as I religiously put fuel in via a funnel with very fine mesh filter in its base.
 

pgrbff

Established Member
Joined
29 Oct 2020
Messages
489
Reaction score
145
Location
Langhe, Piemonte
Stihl
wanted €175 euro's for an ign modual for a fairly new model.....
it lasted 14months......the old stihl's were v good, it's just the modern [email protected]
I will never buy Stihl again....
A large dealer in the south of England stopped selling them because of warranty claims.....
He like me will only buy/sell Japanese equipment.....
Everything I have is all Echo.....
I don't know about current Stihl, I can't afford it, but 2 of my saws are echo and they seem fairly reliable.
 

Gingerbloke

Member
Joined
25 Oct 2017
Messages
5
Reaction score
4
Location
Earlsfield, London
Interesting pic, Noel. but those are only twigs!!
From the serial number, my 048 is supposed to be 1984, but your's looks newer. Been meaning to weigh mine; was wondering whether the 20" Hyundai people are mentioning might be significantly lighter and so more suitable for an oldie.
Will check the filter, Gingerbloke. Never noticed a problem there, as I religiously put fuel in via a funnel with very fine mesh filter in its base.
unlikely you’ll tell anything by viewing it Dick. For the cost i’d just change it. I dug out my Husqy 365 last week. Used it for a few days. it was taking more pulls than usual to start and wasn’t too keen on idling. Tuned it. Still more or less the same. Changed plug and fuel filter. Retuned it. After choke, it now starts first pull and idles as it should I usually change my filters around every 6 months (or if an issue develops). But then my saws are my tools so work every day. Still worth bearing in mind with the filter, as if that is the issue, it doesn’t matter what else you do the issue will remain, which could cost you time and money which is un necessary and for the cost of a filter… i run both Husqy and Stihls and manage them all the same.
 

fixit45

Established Member
Joined
6 Oct 2016
Messages
42
Reaction score
54
Location
Basildon
When two stroke engines are old and left for long periods of time it should be considered that the crankshaft oil seals are at fault. Either due to wear or age breakdown. They should be in good condition to ensure a good seal when the crank case is either sucking in fuel or compressing the fuel into the chamber where it is ignited. These seals are often overlooked but are subjected to some high revs, of the crankshaft.
 

dickm

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
164
Location
North of Aberdeen
When two stroke engines are old and left for long periods of time it should be considered that the crankshaft oil seals are at fault. Either due to wear or age breakdown. They should be in good condition to ensure a good seal when the crank case is either sucking in fuel or compressing the fuel into the chamber where it is ignited. These seals are often overlooked but are subjected to some high revs, of the crankshaft.
Don't I know it! 40 or 50 years ago, I had a rotovator with a round head 2-stroke Villiers engine, which was very temperamental. In those, the "seals" were phosphor bronze bearings, which of course wore fairly rapidly. In the end, took it apart, machined out the crankcase on my unbranded pre-war lathe and fitted modern plastic/rubber seals. It was still running perfectly when I gave it away to a friend, but he managed to strip the bevel gear on the rotovator gearbox so it's probably now in landfill somewhere.
 

Latest posts

Top