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By Steve Maskery
#1040762
Well it is the worst paint job you ever did see, but the kitchen corner is finished.

P1040700.JPG


Those of you who have visited my house will know that the first thing you see is a very scruffy office where you might well expect to see a dining room. But I've actually made a start on doing up the house itself. The spare bedroom now has a dado power rail and half of it is painted. When that is done (tomorrow, if I can shift my lazy bum) I can empty my own bedroom and do that up whereupon I can start to think of moving my office upstairs and start to think of making my house into a home again.
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By Benchwayze
#1044397
Cider? We used to call Scrumpy, Coffin Varnish in the Andrew... I tried it... Once, and I knew why the name! :shock:

Steve, I would certainly like to see your new shop, but the problem is the Doctors have stopped me driving for a while; something about a suspected 'mini-stroke'. Can't see it myself, but I suspect when I tell my Insurance Company, I will have to give up driving anyway, on the grounds of cost!
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By Benchwayze
#1044658
John,

My 'TIA's were remarkably like attacks of 'Ocular Migraine'. I've had them for years, but previously the effects were confined to a slight disturbance of vision; like looking through a cracked window pane. There is plenty of warning, and they last about 15 - 20 minutes, so if an attack comes upon me whilst driving, I have plenty of time to stop, and allow it to pass over.

In the hospital though there were also effects of disturbed speech, hearing and tingling in the fingers, all of which passed off with no effects whatsoever. I was told that this can happen with the migraines, and is not dangerous, and very temporary. So I am inclined to think the 'diagnoses' of TIA were a case of better safe than sorry.

Either way my reflexes were all normal, and the scans could find no evidence of a bleed in the brain. (They actually found a brain, which was maybe a surprise to me!)

Thanks for the heads up John. I will have a word with my doctor, when the 30 days are up. I might even get me off this horrible Cloppydogrel blood thinner. (Spelling!)

So maybe I can look forward to some visits here and there, and can carry on as normal!

Cheers
John :)
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By Steve Maskery
#1067733
You may remember that I originally made a couple of temporary doors to fill the large opening on the left of the building. They are just 4x2s, skinned with 12mm OSB. They've done their job, but are as ugly as sin. So it's time to do the job properly.

I can make them any thickness I want, as the door stops are just planted on and are easily removed. The existing fix is about 65mm thick, and allows for a bit of insulation between the skins. However, if I started with 3" timber and prepped that up, I can foresee some potential problems...

My P/T is a Kity. It's a decent hobby machine, but you couldn't really call it a professional one, the beds are relatively short. This makes planing long boards flat a bit of a challenge. Secondly, even if I did get them flat today, I doubt if they'd still be flat tomorrow. So I have decided to laminate two pieces together, like Glulam. It won't help with the first problem, but it should definitely help with the other.

So a couple of weeks ago I went to the timber yard and bought some wood. I've made a door for Ray's barn, and I'll post some pics of that when we get round to hanging it, but now I have the opportunity to build mine.

I'd expected to get 10" boards, but 9" were the widest they had. It's fine actually. Ripped down, even the boards that were cupped became quite satisfactorily flat and straight.
P1040858 copy.jpeg


It goes to show the importance of having a riving knife. This kerf closed up completely.
P1040856 copy.jpeg


Another advantage of laminating is that if a board has one clear face and one with knots, the clear faces can go to the outside.

I'm using Cascamite for the glue-up. It is strong, doesn't creep, totally waterproof and has a long open time. I used to have a nice little set of electronic scales which were ideal for weighing out Cascamite, but it's gone, so I'm measuring out by volume, my unit being the Eggcup. 3.5 Es of powder to 1 E of water. It's just the right amount to glue one stile. In this picture, there is a stack of 6 boards, but only the centre two are glued, the others are just acting as pressure pads. The thicker the sandwich, the fewer clamps I need and the more evenly the pressure is spread through the joint.

P1040859 copy.jpeg


So I have a few days of gluing up stock before I can get round to doing any actual joinery, but it should make for a topnotch job.
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By monkeybiter
#1067758
Excellent way to resume the thread! I'm watching this keenly, I made the same 'postponed doors' decision a few years ago!

I can see the sun trying to get into your workshop past the old doors in pic no.1, why not throw them open. Mine are smaller but IMHO it still makes for a nicer workshop experience.
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By Steve Maskery
#1067761
I tried to open them but there is a pile of timber stacked outside, preventing me from doing so. I could open them enough to measure the thickness though, but not the whole way.
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By monkeybiter
#1067776
I would highly recommend shifting the timber before the summer [such as it is] is out, I find it very beneficial to my mood, especially with these longer light evenings.
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By Steve Maskery
#1068289
Thanks Pete, I'll take you up on that.
Yesterday I machined up the blanks. They've finished at 66mm thick. That will allow for 40mm insulation, but will also mean that each one is 50% heavier than the one I've just made for Ray. That one I could just about manhandle on my own, I think I shall struggle with these. One stile in particular weighs a ton, it's a lot more resinous than the other three.
I hope I don't regret this.
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By Pete Maddex
#1068387
Steve Maskery wrote:Thanks Pete, I'll take you up on that.
. One stile in particular weighs a ton, it's a lot more resinous than the other three.
I hope I don't regret this.


Sounds like one for the bottom of the door!

Pete
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By Steve Maskery
#1068760
The more the merrier.
Bring your crane...