Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Workshop power supply

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Howjoe

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2005
Messages
158
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Afternoon,

I've ordered my workshop and am currently building the base for it to stand on.

Once I've constructed it, I'll need to arrange a power supply for it. I'll be getting a qualified sparky to do the job, but would appreciate to hear your experiences / advice.

Its only a tiny workshop - biggest I could allow in the garden - 14'x8' so was wandering about plug sockets - how high, where, how many etc etc.

Does anyone use 110v for home use? I'll probably have a mixtures of tools - 240 & 110 (plus transformers.)

All tips greatly received :)
 

dedee

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2003
Messages
2,637
Reaction score
1
Location
14860, France
I have 3 twin sockets in my 14x8 workshop and it is not enough. I could not get by without numerous extension leads and trailing sockets which are a pain and often a trip hazard.
I do not consider myself to be over stocked with power tools but it is surpising how quickly all the sockets get used up or that the available ones are at the wrong end of the workshop.

I wish I had at least another 3 more twin sockets. NB consideration to total loading must be taking into account

Ideal height for me is about 10-12" above bench height with possibly a couple close the floor for the shop vac.

Andy
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
I've seen a shop where they use some power points above the workbench for routing and sanding, the cable stays above the work are stopping trip and drag hazards
 

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,487
Reaction score
1
Location
Weymouth
Howjoe

You can never have enough sockets, my rule of thumb is work out where you want them and add some more in the empty spaces, basically think what you need and double it.

I have both 240v and 110v ring mains in my workshop 7 double 240v socket and 5 110v sockets. This might seem a lot but as I keep changing the positionof tools I find that I might have to move the odd socket or two.
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
Howjoe

Basically what Waka says. However, it may be worth considering two circuits of different ampage. I have two ring mains - one at 13 and one at 20A. I don't use 110v at all. My workshop is bigger (6x5m) but I have one double socket of each circuit every 1m around the walls. The 20 A is at floor level and the 13 at above bench top level. I also have 4 sockets (2 of each) buried in the floor in the middle of the workshop for the TS and other stuff, plus a hanging 6 block above the assembly bench/ TS outfeed.

It seems a lot but its just enough. When you think that its likely that you will have maybe three chargers on the go all the time plus radio and fixed machinery plugged in all the time you can see how few sockets will be left over and then hope that they are in the right place.

Cheers

Tim
 

LeeElms

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2004
Messages
380
Reaction score
0
Location
Bracknell, Berkshire, UK
Tim

I'm not clear about your 13A and 20A circuits ... are these the ratings of the sockets fitted on the circuits, or the overall rating of the circuit (fuse/MCB) ?
 

OLD

Established Member
Joined
9 Aug 2004
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Location
Nantwich Cheshire
Its difficult to answer this as we do not have the number and type of powered tools so work this out and rough position them and provide twin sockets adjacent then provide extra sockets in the spaces between more adjacent to a work bench etc. Hight at dado rail level or if m/c is not adj. a wall find the best place (a opportunity for ducts in the base).
You could get the sparks to fit extra sockets of different configuration (so no plugging in to the wrong voltage) for the 110v to be powered from one transformer on a 240v socket .
Usually a small w/s will have a 30amp supply feeding a 16amp radial circuit running all the 13amp sockets and a 6 amp lighting circuit, if you require a 20amp dedicated circuit to a large table saw etc tell the sparks up front as a larger feed cable may be required.
If you look in screwfix for garage distribution box this is what you will have provided for a small work shop with normal electrics.
 

Howjoe

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2005
Messages
158
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Thanks everyone.

I was planning on just 4 double sockets, but will go for six doubles and a couple of floor level 20A.

Good tips re higher up sockets.

Any guidance on circuit breakers - is there a way of building this in to the overall supply (the house has trip switches).....as you can see, my electrical knowledge only extends to changing plugs! :oops:
 

OLD

Established Member
Joined
9 Aug 2004
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Location
Nantwich Cheshire
All the circuit breakers are in the 'garage/workshop distribution box' are you sure you need a 20amp feed its only required for large machines.
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
I'm assuming that you also realise that you are no longer allowed to do this work yourself. Part P of Building Regs changed all that in Jan 2005. So you will need to get an electrician in.

They will tell you whether you can run supply from the house or whether it makes sense to put in a separate supply.


Re number of sockets - that will give you only 1.5 double sockets per wall. I know it seems like a lot of money when you add up all the parts but I would double that. There is nothing more annoying than having to keep unplugging things to plug other kit in.


Cheers

Tim
 

devonwoody

Established Member
Joined
11 Apr 2004
Messages
13,461
Reaction score
4
Location
Paignton Devon
Tim

Correct me if I am wrong, but you can still fit electrics yourself but then need to have them checked over for a certificate by a qualified and competent person.

Actually this is no different from the old days because if you removed the power company fuse (broke the seal) they should have performed a check before resealing?????????????
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
DW

That may be the case - but its worth checking that the electrician will be willing to do that.

Cheers

Tim
 

devonwoody

Established Member
Joined
11 Apr 2004
Messages
13,461
Reaction score
4
Location
Paignton Devon
I haven't tried it yet but fitting electrics is almost like a sendin in a planning application ???????
Can a planning officer also pass electrics fitted?
 

Howjoe

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2005
Messages
158
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
As I've said, this will all be carried out by a qualified electrician - I'm not competent enough to carry out this bit of work - and for that reason, I think the new regs are a good thing.

Re the 20a, just thought about it as a 'just in case'.

For the time being, 6 doubles should be enough. We'll be moving within two years, so I'll have more of a feel for what I need then.

Thanks

H
 

Shadowfax

Established Member
Joined
1 Nov 2003
Messages
659
Reaction score
0
Location
East Sussex
Just for the record, and before we get into another saga concerning Part P of the Building Regulations the situation is this:
Installing a power supply is notifiable work.
It is nothing to do with Planning but it is the concern of Building Control.
If you are having work done by a qualified electrician he/she must be an installer registered with a competant person's scheme - in which case all the relevant paperwork will be handled for you.
If the electrician is not so registered he/she will have to issue a certificate in accordance with BS7671 (if qualified to do so) which will be accepted by Building Control.
If the work is carried out by an unregistered electrician or is a DIY installation the work will have to be tested by someone who is registered (not merely qualified as an electrician) and Building Control might accept the resulting "periodic inspection". This is where most of the debate rests because of the difficulty in testing a completed installation where there is no knowledge of how the work was carried out before it was covered up.
Just getting work done by a qualified sparky is not always enough.
Actually, leaving aside the safety aspect, the problems only really occur when the house comes up for sale. So, if you remove all the relevant, un-certificated wiring or disconnect it from the mains, there is nothing for the solicitors to highlight when the searches are being carried out. That is where most of the last minute problems happen and where tha panic sets in!
Hope this helps to a certain extent.
Cheers.

SF
 

Howjoe

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2005
Messages
158
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Shadowfax":hwoi62za said:
If you are having work done by a qualified electrician he/she must be an installer registered with a competant person's scheme - in which case all the relevant paperwork will be handled for you.
Which is what I'm having done.....and is reflected in the price :shock:

Cheers
 

PowerTool

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2005
Messages
3,227
Reaction score
0
Location
Darlington
Hi everyone - I built an extension to my existing shed early this year to add 2.5m x 2.5m (8' x 8') onto the end of the 8' x 6' already there (all in brick - first bricklaying project as well..)
Had 2 double sockets already - added one double and three singles,and they have all been used - in fact,feel like I could do with more!!

It was Ok to start with,then I bought a wood lathe...a pillar drill..a bandsaw..a bench grinder/sander.

And put them all at the same height - about three courses of bricks above bench height,to avoid trailing cables.
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Powertool,

Welcome to the forum.

You cannot have too many power points, bit like some women and shoes. :wink:
 
Top