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Wood chuck....advice please...

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Davidf

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Hi

I have a small Charnwood lathe here (the smallest model IIRC).

The original object of having the lathe was to make these..

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j& ... mcihXTpjDw


...but I see I have in my garage some oak, now well seasoned, so I have an ambition to bring the lathe back to life to potently make some nice bits....not just the cones.

I'm completely confused on what to do buy; there seem to be many different derivatives on the theme.

I have a copy of Keith Rowley's "Wood Turning" which warns of buying too big a wood chuck and doing for the bearings.

Any suggestions on what's a good place to start, scroll or other?

How much should I spend? (As a novice I guess ease of use has to be factor though some expandability would be good too!)



Thoughts?

TIA



David





ps I e bayed one set sometime ago which make no sense at all...I am wary of another mistake! :( :x :)
 

petercharlesfagg

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I notice from the Charnwood web site that 3/4 x 16 is a regular size of thread on the headstock.

A chuck that is reasonably light in weight and should assist you in all your endeavours is the Record Nova G3 chuck.

I did a product test for this chuck in the "Woodturning" magazine and this is the link:-
http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=1733

The chuck is very versatile and well suited to the smaller lathes.

Regards Peter.
 

nev

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did you succeed in making the cones? i would imagine although a very simple shape and design it would take some doing to get 4 or more identical in height, unless you're doing them in threes, which gives a little leeway (but cheating a bit :wink: )
 

Davidf

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Cheating is de rigour... 8)

Quite acceptable. :)

But no, not yet, maybe awinter's task.
 

Davidf

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petercharlesfagg":3gj02usb said:
I notice from the Charnwood web site that 3/4 x 16 is a regular size of thread on the headstock.

A chuck that is reasonably light in weight and should assist you in all your endeavours is the Record Nova G3 chuck.

I did a product test for this chuck in the "Woodturning" magazine and this is the link:-
http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=1733

The chuck is very versatile and well suited to the smaller lathes.

Regards Peter.

That looks just what I need, thanks.

Good call.....and yes I feel sure 3/4 x 16 is right from previous forays.
 

Davidf

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petercharlesfagg":3s7jumjf said:
I notice from the Charnwood web site that 3/4 x 16 is a regular size of thread on the headstock.

A chuck that is reasonably light in weight and should assist you in all your endeavours is the Record Nova G3 chuck.

I did a product test for this chuck in the "Woodturning" magazine and this is the link:-
http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=1733

The chuck is very versatile and well suited to the smaller lathes.

Regards Peter.

Bear with me for few thicky questions....

I'd imagined that the work is gripped from the outside. I see from the picture on your link , in that instance the work is gripped from the INSIDE.

This lead to me to wonder if this is the standard way of doing it.....so if you grab your lump of timber is the first thing to do to drill a hole in it so that the chuck will then fit in ...and you can "turn" away? If that's the case should I equip myself with pretty fat drill to make the donor hole?

Like I say, I thought I d have to grip the work from the OUTSIDE of the vase/bowl/cup/what ever. ....and what size jaws i'd need to do that.

Can you help me with the learning curve here, please? :)
 

jumps

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such chucks will, and do frequently, work in both expansion and compression modes. In the latter they will handle square stock or a rounded spigot - and anything inbetween! What is important for the ultimate holding in any of these modes is the relationship between the circle of the jaws and the diameter of the spigot or recess. typically this will be about 6mm more than the 'closed' dimensions with standard 50mm jaws (put another way they are not a true circle when fully closed!

you wouldn't normally drill a hole to create a chucking recess - partly because you will normally angle the side to match the jaws. the process would normally involve mounting the wood either between centres or on a screw chuck and then turning the spigot, or recess. Alternatively you would attach a faceplate to one face and go from there - effectively a screw chuck and faceplate do the same thing but are suited to different sizes and shapes.

you should be able to pick up a screw chuck pretty easily for a 3/4 x 16 headstock, but then again you could also get a collet chucking system that will do all of these functions (but without the wider versatility of the scroll chuck) - Rowley illustrates one of these sets in his section on chucks.
 

Davidf

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jumps":sn6a7xpc said:
such chucks will, and do frequently, work in both expansion and compression modes. In the latter they will handle square stock or a rounded spigot - and anything inbetween! What is important for the ultimate holding in any of these modes is the relationship between the circle of the jaws and the diameter of the spigot or recess. typically this will be about 6mm more than the 'closed' dimensions with standard 50mm jaws (put another way they are not a true circle when fully closed!

you wouldn't normally drill a hole to create a chucking recess - partly because you will normally angle the side to match the jaws. the process would normally involve mounting the wood either between centres or on a screw chuck and then turning the spigot, or recess. Alternatively you would attach a faceplate to one face and go from there - effectively a screw chuck and faceplate do the same thing but are suited to different sizes and shapes.

you should be able to pick up a screw chuck pretty easily for a 3/4 x 16 headstock, but then again you could also get a collet chucking system that will do all of these functions (but without the wider versatility of the scroll chuck) - Rowley illustrates one of these sets in his section on chucks.

Useful hints...thanks very much.
 

Davidf

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Yes, this a good start.

I want to grip a lump of oak about 75 mil in diam, which is just oiutside what the supplied jaws will grip. Is there another set of jaws I can get for the chuck? I know there is reluctance in the notes concerning using bigger jaws but it isn't a heavy job, its just suits me to be able to work with this size of wood.

I gather that that the chuck is compatable with other jaws etc

Can any one help with the next size out (link), please?
 

YewTube

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Davidf":3b96c4nf said:
I want to grip a lump of oak about 75 mil in diam, which is just oiutside what the supplied jaws will grip. Is there another set of jaws I can get for the chuck?
It is usual practice to mount the wood between centres and put a tenon on one end which will fit the chuck. This will also give you a shoulder to butt up against the face of the jaws for a more secure hold. Create your cone and then part off as close to the chuck as possible. The tenon will be left in the chuck as waste.

Good luck
 

Davidf

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The G3 chuck was a good recommendation, though.

There is going to be a bit of a learning curve here ...but it was a good call.
 

Davidf

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petercharlesfagg":1sm0h7rc said:
I notice from the Charnwood web site that 3/4 x 16 is a regular size of thread on the headstock.

A chuck that is reasonably light in weight and should assist you in all your endeavours is the Record Nova G3 chuck.

I did a product test for this chuck in the "Woodturning" magazine and this is the link:-
http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=1733

The chuck is very versatile and well suited to the smaller lathes.

Regards Peter.

Great result.

Can any one advise what wood it is?
 
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