• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

toothing a blade

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

marcros

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
11,101
Reaction score
643
Location
Leeds
I have just acquired a cheap silverline block plane. I would like to make it into a toothing plane, to be used beneath the bveneer layer on a small panel.

Has anybody toothed a blade- and if so what did they use to do so? I dont have a vast aray of tooling, but have a dremel, a few metalworking hand tools etc.

I assume that they toothed from the non bevel side, so can be sharpened as normal? How wide should the teeth be?
 

marcros

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
11,101
Reaction score
643
Location
Leeds
Thank you BB. Seems that it may not be a matter of cutting a few slots in it then!
 

Richard T

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2009
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
0
Location
Wet Midlands
I'm sure I have seen them with plain square cut teeth - not sure you'll have much joy cutting them into a hard iron though, and I'm sure the heat generated would be too much.
Much better imho to start with a nice piece of annealed o1, cut the grooves, then harden and temper.

I'll look mine out and take some photos.
 

marcros

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
11,101
Reaction score
643
Location
Leeds
Ray iles also does them, so my plan was to have a go- the plane cost me next to nothing, and if not get either a ray iles if it will fit, a stanley off here or ebay and fit the RI to it if not, or final option a LN toothed blade to fit my 102 (or 103 whichever of those I have). Or a woodie with a toothed blade in.

I found this link which makes it all seem possible http://www.jasminedavis.com/cello/gallery/album33

Like I said, the plane owes me nothing, so if it all goes horribly wrong, it doesnt matter.
 

Pete Maddex

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2005
Messages
9,172
Reaction score
124
Location
Nottingham
Hi,

I cut a bearing off a shaft with a dremal and cut off disk, it went through the hardened steel quickly and didn't put to much heat in, so I think you could make one.

Pete
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
There's no real need to buy toothing blades/irons unless you're going to do a great deal of grounding work.

I use triangular needle files or xx fine saw files when toothing irons for bevel down and bevel up planes. A Dremel, with cut-off wheel fitted, serves well when setting out the tooth spacing. Files handle the cut well, you can vary toothing depth and you can avoid having shavings jam between blade and cap iron if you file the toothing pattern on the side of the blade opposing the cap iron as well as by keeping the cap iron further back from the cutting edge.

The resulting wispy shavings used to make hours of fun for my daughters as they'd pinch them for use as wigs on their dolls lol
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
2
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
Yup...you can make your own for stock removal on tough grain to thickness the stock...particularly when it is thin stuff.

I made one from an old woodie smoother...just castellations cut with a Dremel as others have said . This effectively leaves a row of small chisel blades which allow you to cut through the fibres easily.

There are in fact two types of "toothed" irons. The ones shown above are traditionally also used for roughing surface wood for veneer adhesion but castellated bevels are better for rapid stock removal.

Jim
 

Richard T

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2009
Messages
1,743
Reaction score
0
Location
Wet Midlands
Aha Jim, that's what mine will be then; a surface rougher.



It's an old Marples. Still makes very good doll wigs though Gary.
 
Top