SIP 16 inch Pro Bandsaw blade help

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

RedArcher1968

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Reading
Hi

I’m new to woodworking and have a SIP 16 inch Bandsaw. I’m looking for a narrower blade to practice some curve cuts. The online instructions has a range from 6mm - 37mm. The instructions included state 10mm - 25mm (However the front cover says SIP 16 inch Pro but the last page ref SIP 14 inch Pro). The sticker on the machine says 9.5mm - 24 or 25mm.
I have contacted SIP’s technical department who I’m guessing read from the online manual 6mm - 37mm?

If you use/own a SIP 16 inch which minimum blade size have you used.

Hope it makes sense

Regards
RedArcher68
 

RichardG

If at first you don’t succeed have a cup of tea.
Joined
29 Mar 2018
Messages
782
Reaction score
437
Location
South Norfolk
You could try Ian at Tuffsaws he’ll recommend what he thinks is the smallest blade from experience but give you the option to exchange if it doesn’t work for you, can’t say fairer that that.

The minimum blade width is mainly influenced by the guides, can the rear guide be brought close to the rear of the blade whilst the side guides support the blade but behind the teeth, if that makes sense? So you can get a rough idea using a strip of cardboard.

One way of using very narrow blades on any bandsaw is to replace the side guides with some hard wood, easier on some bandsaws than others. That way if the teeth do touch the guide they just cut through it.
 

Orraloon

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2016
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
450
Location
Blue mountains Australia
It kind of depends on the guides on the saw as said above. If you can not adjust it so the teeth are in front of the side guides then you will wreck the blade. I have used a 3/16'' blade by taking the side guides off to do bandsaw boxes. I just had to be careful and not put too much sideways flex on the blade. There are special small blade guides but I am not sure if they fit all saws.
Finesse Your Bandsaw Into a Scrollsaw
The wood side blocks mentioned above will work if you can mount them to the saw. I ran wood blocks in my previous saw all the time instead to the metal blocks. The hardest wood you can find laying around. They say lignum vite is best but who has any of that.
Regards
John
 

Orraloon

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2016
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
450
Location
Blue mountains Australia
We are blessed with plenty of very hard woods. That said some can be a bit hard on tools too. I have not used buloke myself but some of the related casuarina (sheoak) species are seriously nice looking timbers. I sometimes rescue bits of firewood for turning and small things.
Regards
John.

johns pics 006.JPG
 

RedArcher1968

New member
Joined
5 Jul 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Reading
Thanks for the advise guys.

I’ll definitely get in contact with Ian at Tuffsaws. There does seem to be loads of adjustment (definitely in the lower one which goes way past the side guides).
Top one is more involved to adjust it in the time I have to take a look.

I’ll keep in mind the wood block idea as it may come in handy at some point.

Thanks again guys for taking the time to respond

Regards
RedArcher
 

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
2,193
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Sunny Glasgow
We are blessed with plenty of very hard woods. That said some can be a bit hard on tools too. I have not used buloke myself but some of the related casuarina (sheoak) species are seriously nice looking timbers. I sometimes rescue bits of firewood for turning and small things.
Regards
John.

View attachment 113564
Very nice, and handy marking gauge, this the casuarina then ?, TThats a nice red with good demarcation. . But what is the arrangement with locking it :confused: It looks like a peg, but that cant be the case. Two thumb screws ?.
 

Orraloon

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2016
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
450
Location
Blue mountains Australia
First up sorry for the hijack Red Archer and hope all goes well your bandsawing adventures.
Triton,
Its called a French marking gauge and I find the crossways pin/wedge easier to operate than the English design with the wedge in line with the stock. So apart from food they also do a better marking gauge. This should explain how its made.
How to Make a Marking Gauge | The Literary Workshop Blog
Regards
John
 

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
2,193
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Sunny Glasgow
Very interesting, the wedged peg I mean. As to the gauge, not sure spalted anything is the timber of choice, given part of its structure is rotten wood, softened by the infection. Maybe a bit soft in places to put pressure on. They look very nice all the same.
I made a mahogany one years ago, a mortise gauge with thumbscrew adjustment on the mortise pins. A gift to the college I was doing a joinery qualification in. 18" overall length with a 6"x2"head and thumb turn locking.
Wish I'd never given them it to be honest :LOL: It was tricky to make, especially making the brass mechanism for the mortising pin adjustment. Inlaid brass strip in the usual places. Turned out quite nice I felt.
 
Top