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Sanding Sealer and Knotting

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WoodMangler

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Having used Sanding Sealer for the first time when I recently started turning, I'm about to try it on flat work too.Not sure what the wood is, just (good quality) sawn softwood from the local timber yard. The question is, should I apply the Knotting before the Sanding Sealer, or after ?
 

AndyT

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As far as I know, both sanding sealer and knotting are a solution of shellac in alcohol, so I can't imagine it would make much difference.
 

WoodMangler

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AndyT":1i92hlit said:
As far as I know, both sanding sealer and knotting are a solution of shellac in alcohol, so I can't imagine it would make much difference.
My sanding sealer is cellulose based, might not be too good an idea to mix it with alcohol. I'll try it on an offcut first.
 

Sgian Dubh

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WoodMangler":3c8ftq7t said:
AndyT":3c8ftq7t said:
As far as I know, both sanding sealer and knotting are a solution of shellac in alcohol, so I can't imagine it would make much difference.
My sanding sealer is cellulose based, might not be too good an idea to mix it with alcohol. I'll try it on an offcut first.
Knotting is a shellac based product. I'm guessing you already know that its purpose to prevent bleed out of resins from, primarily, the knots and resin pockets found in softwoods such as pine, fir, etc. It's not always successful at doing the job, especially if the reservoir of resin is copious and very runny. Knotting is also primarily used under paint films rather than clear polishes.

Generally you'll seldom need knotting when finishing hardwoods, but if you are using the stuff for whatever reason you apply the knotting first to expected problem areas, then overcoat with your finish.

In your case I'd omit the knotting altogether if you're not dealing with a resinous knotty wood. Slainte.
 

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