Powerfile "adapter" for angle grinder

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robgul

Barry Bucknell is my hero
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I have the need for very infrequent use of a powerfile/narrow belt sander - I don't really want yet another tool so was wondering about the inexpensive adapters that I have seen which appear to just fix to an angle-grinder instead of the disc. My angle grinder is an old-ish corded B&D but works fine - again infrequent use - I think it runs at 30,000 rpm which, unless it's geared down, seems a bit quick for a powerfile!

Any thoughts/suggestions/experiences appreciated . . . .
 
Most angle grinders (standard size) run at 10,000 rpm. That is about 5x too fast for a powerfile in my opinion, you will wear out the belts way too fast.

I will have the check the speed on mine (it's adjustable) but I prefer to run it at slower speeds, more control and the belts last a really long time, usually the belt itself breaks down before the abrasive wears away.
 
. . . I'll dig out the machine and check the rpm - 30,000 does seem too fast! It's on or off, no variable speed.
 
. . . I'll dig out the machine and check the rpm - 30,000 does seem too fast! It's on or off, no variable speed.

Most angle grinders are single speed. 4-5" models are around 10k, 9" models about 6k I think (I don't own one that big).

I do have a 5" angle grinder from Lidl that is variable speed and it has rather spoilt me, it's such a handy feature. I think it would probably work fine with a powerfile attachment at the lower speeds.
 
For the sake of an extra few quid I would just get a cheapie Silverline powerfile off Amazon. It's one of those tools that you don't need very often, but when you do, nothing else will do and "attachements" never seem to work quite as well as the dedicated item.
 
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For the sake of an extra few quid I would just get a cheapie Silverline powerfile off Amazon. It's one of those tools that you don't need very often, but when you do, nothing else will do and "attachements" never seem to work quite as well as the dedicated item.
+1
A much better solution imo and no fiddling about attaching it to a grinder just ready to pick up and use. Guaranteed tool if it breaks which I doubt you would find with a cheap attachment.
I admit to being biased though as I much prefer dedicated tools where possible and appreciate not everyone thinks that way.
 
For the sake of an extra few quid I would just get a cheapie Silverline powerfile off Amazon. It's one of those tools that you don't need very often, but when you do, nothing else will do and "attachements" never seem to work quite as well as the dedicated item.

That was my fallback position - but I've had mixed results with a few Silverline tools I've had in the past and I don't want to spring top-brand money on something like a Bosch or Makita.

Have to say I agree on attachments - remember the horror of the B&D stuff in the late 60s/early 70s - attchments for a drill : circular saw, sander, hedge-trimmer, jigsaw to mention a few!
 
Having owned the Black and Decker power file for year's I would buy one of these £44.99 delivered from FFX.
 
Silverline tools may not always be the best (some are very good) but their customer service is excellent and their guarantee is lifetime.

I had a pair of snips/shears break, sent them pictures and a message. The tool was discontinued (it was maybe 5 years old) so they weren't able to replace it directly so they told me to look through the snips/cutters section of their catalogue and pick the closest thing I could find that would be useful for me. I chose a pair of pipe cutters that happened to be twice the price of the ones that had broken (not on purpose, it was the closest item) and they sent it out to me, no problems at all and when it arrived it came with a set of replacement blades as well (a £10 extra cost). Very polite staff as well.

The pipe cutter is excellent.
 
I think it's going to be the Silverline - the B&D is a bit chunky with the motor on the side and likely to get in the way with some of the stuff I expect to sand.

Hopefully it'll be better than the Silverline "dremel type machine" which failed in 3 different ways within a week of purchase - as stated, there is a good guarantee, and if I buy from Amazon there's a package with extra belts at reasonable cost AND I get the Amazon no-quibble returns deal.
 
remember the horror of the B&D stuff in the late 60s/early 70s - attchments for a drill : circular saw, sander, hedge-trimmer, jigsaw to mention a few!
:D My first power tools, orbital sander, jigsaw, circular saw and lathe all powered by a small drill.
 
:D My first power tools, orbital sander, jigsaw, circular saw and lathe all powered by a small drill.

I suppose the concept was the same as today's "common battery platform" for loads of different tools (of the same brand) - just the other way round!

A drill-press and a horizontal box thing that clamped the drill to take a grinding or polishing wheel also crept into my garage . . . that said I still have a B&D orange coloured drill from about 1979 that's still going strong after a lot of use.
 
I suppose the concept was the same as today's "common battery platform" for loads of different tools (of the same brand) - just the other way round!

A drill-press and a horizontal box thing that clamped the drill to take a grinding or polishing wheel also crept into my garage . . . that said I still have a B&D orange coloured drill from about 1979 that's still going strong after a lot of use.
I still have some of those as well tucked away. It was the faff of removing the chuck and fit a different adapter for each attachment but in those days it was innovation I guess.
 
I still have some of those as well tucked away. It was the faff of removing the chuck and fit a different adapter for each attachment but in those days it was innovation I guess.

Yebbut getting the chuck off was easy - fit the chuck key and tap it with the hammer to start unscrewing - a lot simpler than the drill of today (at least the ones I have)
 
That's very true but the only reason to take off a chuck nowadays is because it's damaged, or am I missing something. You reminded me though I must dig out those old drills, I vividly remember getting my first new fangled 2 speed hammer drill. :)
 
That's very true but the only reason to take off a chuck nowadays is because it's damaged, or am I missing something. You reminded me though I must dig out those old drills, I vividly remember getting my first new fangled 2 speed hammer drill. :)

You might want to swap from keyed to keyless or vice versa. I changed the chuck on my combi drill to a 1/2" keyed so I could run SDS bits in it.
 
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