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Rich.ca

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This is my shop, it's around 35' square although I have to share it with the car this time of year as it's starting to get cold and it's not too nice going to work in a cold car when it's 25 below, so I move everything over to make space for it so it can share the heat in there too :roll:

Excuse the mess, but I've been working with MDF, and boy does that stuff make a mess!





I've started adding work surface around the outside, and as time and funds allow I'll put shelves underneath and doors on the front, along with a couple of wall cabinets.










My latest edition is a Beaver table saw, it may be old (from the 50's) but it's good, accurate and does everything I need.




I got my joiner for free, it was for sale on the local free ads website. When I went to look at it, the guy plugged it in and it wouldn't work, he said it had been in storage for a couple of years and was obviously no good any more and I coululd have it for free or he'd throw it out. When I got it home I plugged it in and it worked just fine :D




My thicknesser isn't that great, but it works.




The dust from the MDF, I'm glad I've got a shop vac!



 

devonwoody

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Very nice, I suppose the downside is that as you say its cold in winter. The aussies moan its hot in summer, we in the UK say its damp anytime.
 

Harbo

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That's pretty enormous compared to UK garage sizes!
Cannot even try to get cars into mine anymore but convince myself that it's a good thing as I do no longer bring wet cold metal into it?
Gets down to -11 C on very, very rare occasions here but does rain a fair bit.

Rod

PS - I see from another post that you are a Limey so all the above is a bit wasted?
 

monkeybiter

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All that space :shock: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

However, I think you need some better dust extraction :wink:

But still, all that space!
 

Waka

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Thats not a workshop, its a ballroom. I can only dream of that amount of space for a workshop.
 

soulboy

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yeah, definitely a stealth gloat, he even needs a motorized mower to get around! ;)
i'm dead jealous.
 

Rich.ca

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I was lost in there at first because it was bigger than I was used to from the UK, but it doesn't take long before you fill it with junk. I also have 2 15' square sheds :oops: Dust extraction is on the cards, but again, as time and funds allow.

Heres my gloat - I'll post up some pics of our back garden later so you can see why I have a ride on mower... 8)
 

Max Power

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Excellent workshop Rich 8) but you really need to be capturing that mdf dust at source, its really nasty stuff :evil:
 

doorframe

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Hi Rich. Great workshop. I'm proper jealous.

I've got the same thicknesser. As you say, it's not great but it works. Do you find that the 1st and last 2 inches are cut lower than the rest? I get that on mine. There's too much 'play' in the sleeves of the mechanism, which tilts as the rollers come into and out of contact with the workpiece. . I've done some mods and improved it but it's never going to be a great machine.

Love the clock in pic 4.

Roy
 

woodbloke

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Good grief!...that's not a workshop. You can park a 747 in there. Not jealous, much :mrgreen: :mrgreen: - Rob
 

bosshogg

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doorframe":1uzwbzxk said:
Hi Rich. Great workshop. I'm proper jealous.

I've got the same thicknesser. As you say, it's not great but it works. Do you find that the 1st and last 2 inches are cut lower than the rest? I get that on mine. There's too much 'play' in the sleeves of the mechanism, which tilts as the rollers come into and out of contact with the workpiece. . I've done some mods and improved it but it's never going to be a great machine.

Love the clock in pic 4.

Roy
Roy, try lifting the end of the wood as the start of it is grabbed by the feed roller, it sometimes helps. The general reason for the first and last couple of inches being thinner than the main body of wood, is the space between, both the in and outfeed rollers, from the point of cut of the cutters. The main body of the cut is under the pressure of both, whilst the first and last couple of inches are only under the pressure of one at a time i.e. the first inches under the pressure of the infeed and the last inches the outfeed. Too high a pressure on these rollers is a general cause, but as you adjust off the pressure, the wood tends not to be driven, hence the excessive pressure.
I once had a case where a Wadkin 28" thicknesser had the bottom bed so worn out of true due to wear by the silica in wood, that the rollers had to be set down to drive the wood (narrower stock always being fed in the left hand side of the bed?) had worn the bed down so much that subsequent narrow stock would not grip, solution adjust the roller pressure. Over years this had accumulated, and tradesmen had adjusted the length of stock to account for the thinner ends.
Don't know your situation, but sounds similar, yes?
Cheers...bosshogg :)
I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.
Albert Einstein 8)
 

doorframe

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bosshogg":13t9lrl3 said:
. Too high a pressure on these rollers is a general cause, but as you adjust off the pressure, the wood tends not to be driven, hence the excessive pressure.
Cheers...bosshogg :)
Hi BH. This thicknesser is a very basic piece of kit. The roller pressure is not adjustable. They are preset and go up and down with the cutter head. I did try weaker springs, but as you say there is insufficient grip. The whole mechanism carrying the rollers and head rocks from front to back as the rollers engage and dissengage because of the 'slop' in the castings where the 4 upright posts run through. I've added to this setup to reduce the 'rocking' and it's definately improved, but silk purse and sow's ear come to mind.

Cheers,
Roy
 
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