Quantcast

Making concave drawer front fingergrips.

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

recipio

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2008
Messages
66
Reaction score
7
Location
ireland
Folks, don't quite know what to call them - those scooped out depressions used by the Victorians for apothecary's drawer fronts. They have a turned button/ knob at the base. The question is how to make them ? For small drawers I have mounted them in the lathe but you are turning a depression in a spinning propeller. ! They need sanding as well which blurs the crisp edge of the 'crater'.
The solution would suggest a router jig of some kind but online research has yielded no info. I suspect they have been abandoned due to falling out of fashion but I'm wondering if anybody has found a solution ?
 

bjm

Naturally different
Joined
19 May 2007
Messages
420
Reaction score
138
Location
High Wycombe
As you say, I would make a jig and router them out with a dishing cutter. I would probably use a small forstner first though as this would give you the centre point to drill for the knob and also something to align the jig.
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
1,916
Reaction score
134
Location
Wiltshire
Firstly... 2 pieces.

Secondly, do you want the old way or the new way?!

Are you aiming for a hemispherical dimple or a flat bottomed one? A box core bit in a router will approximate the first, a ground spade bit will give you exactly it and also the pilot for the pull that’s then lo ng-grain and wedged in

Aidan
 

custard

Established Member
Joined
20 Aug 2008
Messages
6,958
Reaction score
202
Location
South East
I made a dressing table with matching bedside cabs that had a similar drawer pull arrangement. Can't find any photos yet but I'll keep looking.

The method was two simple jigs, both with fences that delivered a precise location on a drawer front. The first was for an 8mm hole for a drawer pull. The second jig centred in exactly the same location and comprised a hole about 60mm diameter in a piece of 18mm ply. Then use a bearing guided router cutter like one these to plunge and run around the hole to form the depression. Just take it in a few passes, with a final clean up pass of just half a mill, and it's simple, quick and clean. Note, the ply jig needs to be thick enough to allow the bearing to still make contact even with the first light passes.

 
Last edited:

recipio

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2008
Messages
66
Reaction score
7
Location
ireland
Thanks all.
A router jig is the obvious way to go ( which makes me admire the old Victorian makers even more ) However, I'm sure those 60 mm dished bits are designed for table use only. I think a router with a convex ( saucer shaped ) baseplate might work with a convex bit. The trick is to adapt it for different sized diameter' hemispheres' as drawer fronts will vary in size and depth. I'll try and make some prototypes as clearly no one has produced a working jig so far.?
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
3,072
Reaction score
431
Location
Edinburgh
The way i was shown when learning woodworking in Germany was that they tended to use a gouge or scorp for things like that
1603101715204.png
 

Latest posts

Top