Quantcast

Any idea how this cut has been made

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

beekeeper

Member
Joined
22 Aug 2010
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
N W Leicestershire
Hello UK workshop - I am a relative newcomer to woodworking and whilst I have been a member here for a while I normally spend my time absorbing the advice from the more experienced posters to this forum.

However I should be grateful if anyone could possibly advise how the bee hive handles shown on the attached photos have been cut and with what tool. It looks like a router table cut - but it is not a consistent depth being a nice even sculpt into and then back out of the timber to form the handle. This is cut into a proprietary bought beehive and I am trying to replicate it if I can. The cut is 112mm long by 30mm wide at it's widest and 12mm deep at it's deepest. It is cut into 22mm cedar - ( albeit rather roughly finished cedar)

Be grateful if someone could advise how this has been cut and with what.

Thanks in anticipation

IMG_0150.JPG
IMG_0147.JPG


Kind Regards

Beekeeper
 

Attachments

Cheshirechappie

Established Member
Joined
30 Jan 2012
Messages
4,732
Reaction score
17
Location
Cheshire
The finish is a bit torn and rough, so definitely machine cut without any cleaning-up afterwards. I think Bigdanny is about right - a plunge, then a traverse to give the flat at the bottom of the recess, and out. In a production set-up, that would be about the quickest way of doing it.
 

beekeeper

Member
Joined
22 Aug 2010
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
N W Leicestershire
Thank you gentlemen

I am not familiar with the relative advantages of a Spindle moulder over a standard router table. Clearly there must be some sort of Arc cut avaiable on the Spindle moulder to give such an even plunge in and out of the cut. Would anyone know if there any way this can be achieved using a reasonably high end router table with an incra positioner??.

Thanks again
 

Cheshirechappie

Established Member
Joined
30 Jan 2012
Messages
4,732
Reaction score
17
Location
Cheshire
If you only need one or two, a very acceptable result could be achieved with a gouge and a chisel or two, quite possibly quicker than it would take to set a router up.
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
0
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
You can do this on a router table with a good solid fence, ideally as high as the workpiece.
Set a pair of stops to govern the beginning and end of the cut. Maybe do it in a couple of passes with a final fine cut top remove/avoid any burning. Keep the cutter speed down too.

Bob
 

Phil Pascoe

occasional purveyor of blunt tools.
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
19,041
Reaction score
232
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
Just use a plunge cut with a square cutter -the hole will be a different shape, but hey ho! it's easy, cheap( you've already got the cutter)--it's a beehive, I doubt the bees will swarm when they see a different shaped finger grip!
 

SurreyHills

Established Member
Joined
5 May 2010
Messages
302
Reaction score
0
Location
Fetcham, Surrey
I normally do them with a router fitted with a cove bit in my router table. As Bob says you need to use a fence with stops to get the cut centred correctly and will certainly need to practice a few times. It's not the bit that isn't long enough it's the height that your router can raise the bit above the table surface. For example, a Trend T11 has got an 80mm plunge depth whereas a Trend T5 has only got 50mm depth of plunge. So if your router can't raise the bit above the table by enough you'll have to compromise and have the handle recess closer to the top.
 

Pete Maddex

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2005
Messages
9,079
Reaction score
54
Location
Nottingham
Hi,

A series of cuts with a biscuit joiner would do, or you could screw a piece of wood on.
It is probbaly only done that was as it is the cheapest way, once you have a machine set up to do the cut.

Pete
 

Benchwayze

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2007
Messages
9,146
Reaction score
1
Location
West Muddylands
Hi Pete,

Wouldn't a series of cuts with a Biscuit joiner give a different shape? Almost the same as the 'scooped' rectangles you see, ground into glass doors as finger pulls? Rather than a scoop with one rounded edge.

How about:

An overhead template, to hold the workpiece. The machining is done before the box is glued for assembly.
The template is wedged shaped or sloped, so the workpiece is presented at an angle. Toggle clamps to hold the piece firmly. That would achieve a smooth, varying depth of cut. A plunge and a traverse would give the shape, plus the gradual slope on the scoop. Once you set the template right, and practice the movements a few times, I think it would be pretty quick.

Sorry about the edits. This is difficult to explain! :mrgreen:

John :)
 

Phil Pascoe

occasional purveyor of blunt tools.
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
19,041
Reaction score
232
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
SurreyHills- surely the actual plunge is irrelevant when cutting sideways? You haven't enough distance between the cutter and the nut on the shaft to work at any depth.
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
0
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
phil.p":1ebxkqti said:
SurreyHills- surely the actual plunge is irrelevant when cutting sideways? You haven't enough distance between the cutter and the nut on the shaft to work at any depth.
Simply use a cutter with a large enough diameter to clear the collet nut or shaft extender if that is getting in the way.

Another cutter to consider could be a panel raising bit at varying heights - usually plenty big enough but keep the speed down.

Bob
 

SurreyHills

Established Member
Joined
5 May 2010
Messages
302
Reaction score
0
Location
Fetcham, Surrey
Beekeeper said that his problem was getting the cut far enough from the top edge - the flat part of the handle looks to be about 7 cms from the top . As he should only attempt this type of cut with a router table. In order to do this he needs the cutter raised above the table by this amount. In order to raise the cutter head he should use the plunge mechanism.

This type of recessed handle is common in Langstroth and Dadant hives, i.e. single walled hives. With Dadant the handle is about 10cms from the top and Langstroth about 7cms. If you can't make the recessed handle the put a cleat across 2 ends.
 

beekeeper

Member
Joined
22 Aug 2010
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
N W Leicestershire
Thanks for all the feedback Gentlemen - really helpful.

I have a T11 on an Incra table with positioner with stops so could have a go on an incremental cut basis as suggested by Surrey Hills with the ball nose cutter 9 fingers suggested. If done incrementally and the length of cut is reduced an the latter cuts it should get somewhere close to an even sculpt in and out. If the distance from the top of the box can be achieved with the T11 so much the better but it is not overly critical. Thanks for the cutter link 9 fingers and I will give some thought to the angled jig Benchwayze.

I will have a go chaps and post back if I get a result.

Thanks again for all your input

Kind regards

BK
 

Latest posts

Top