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Advice wanted from cabinet makers

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andersonec

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I want to do a cabinet making course which runs for ten weeks, one evening a week, 30 hours in total. There is no syllabus as it is a course for all grades of experience.
I want to pick a project to do which would involve most of the cabinet making skills, maybe even some curved work so I want to pick your brains to see if you have any ideas of something nice I could make over this period which would include lots of skills, amount of difficulty wouldn't be a problem as I am not a total beginner, any pictures would be good and appreciated.

With thanks.
Andy
 

Hudson Carpentry

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How about something like
but with a draw as well.

This is give you experience in not just making doors but curved ones as well as curved draw fronts. Dovetails if you choose for the draw. Wood turning. A few different joints. Curved/shaped feet. Researching sizes of bottles to make the best sized hole. Cutting large holes.

And at the end you can celebrate by drinking what tipple you fill it with!!
 

andersonec

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Nice one, just the sort of thing to get stuck into, I will definitely take a picture with me and see what the instructor say's.

It is at Newark College and he says he has guy's come from Nottingham.

Thanks.
Andy
 

condeesteso

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agreed - that's a fine challenge I think. Flat forms and rectilinear is actually quite easy, but this will push the boundaries a bit. Whatever you do, as soon as you stray from straight lines everything gets more 'interesting'. Well done for challenging yourself, and take a tricky one on, why not. Plus, do report back :wink: .
 

disco_monkey79

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That's a great looking piece of furniture!

Andy - good luck with the course. Can you advise of its formal title, as it sounds great,. I was wondering if it might be held in other colleges too?
 

spg

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Warwickshire College at Leamington Spa also run a similar course.

Depending upon previous experience, they quite often recommend to start with basics. Sharpening chisels and blades, setting up a plane before making a small frame by hand with different joints in each corner. After the first term you should be happy with your core hand tools and the use of the main pieces of large machinary.

After that you are free to work on your own project, making use of the facilties and grabbing time with the tutors on design/technique.

My experience is that a term is not very long and you can make something like a table with handcut dovetail draws plus practice other techniques.

A typical term's schedule for such a table would be:

Week 1 : Discuss your goals and any project thoughts you have. Create cutting list.
Week 2 : Provide wood and prepare it before leaving it to acclimatise
Week 3 : Re-square and thinkness due to movement. Mark out and cut mortice and tenons
Week 4 : Finish mortice and tenons if cutting by hand. Glue up main table structure and top
Week 5 : Start drawer. Practice handcutting dovetails
Week 6 : Start cutting dovetails
Week 7 : More dovetails. Glue up drawer.
Week 8 : Fettle drawer for nice fit. Sanding etc . . .
Week 9 : Apply finish and set to dry
Week 10 : Collect table and pat on the back

Hope this helps.
 

woodbloke

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condeesteso":1ku1aw3q said:
agreed - that's a fine challenge I think. Flat forms and rectilinear is actually quite easy, but this will push the boundaries a bit. Whatever you do, as soon as you stray from straight lines everything gets more 'interesting'. Well done for challenging yourself, and take a tricky one on, why not. Plus, do report back :wink: .
I agree 100%. As soon as a curve of any description is introduced it not only makes the project more interesting to make, but visually lifts it from the 'mundane' to the 'that looks a nice piece' sort of category.

I'd also suggest that the piece:



...here is pretty advanced and although there's lots of curved work in it, I'd be inclined to go for something a lot more simple and work up to this sort of thing over an extended period- Rob
 

Sgian Dubh

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A piece like this is too complex for someone with only moderate skills to make in the thirty hours available. Something more along the lines described by spg is more likely to be finished.

I am pretty certain of this as we have similar classes, not run by me, at the college where I work. But I am very aware of the fact that some of the students, even making a simple project similar to the one outlined by spg, are a long way from completing their work in a ten week period. Some students, even those with some skills at the beginning, can take three sets of ten week three hour sessions to complete fairly basic pieces. Slainte.
 
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