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By Bodrighy
#561679
Save hijacking Pauls thread . This quote covers yew
“Not to omit any one of them, the yew is similar to these other trees in general appearance . . . It is an ascertained fact that travellers’ vessels, made in Gaul of this wood, for the purpose of holding wine, have caused the death of those who used them.”

–Pliny the Elder, from “Naturalis Historia,” ca. 77 AD

This is probably one of the better tables regarding the different woods.
Image

Mod Edit: Image reference updated 13/01.2012 CHJ
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By CHJ
#561691
Thanks for that link Pete, I'll add the link to the information Sticky lists.

I guess your Pliny Quote could have a dozen or more similar substances inserted in lew of Yew that proved equally toxic in retrospect.

Lead water containment in roman through to the 20th century is one, how many of the current generation living in older properties know they should run the cold tap for a few minutes in the morning before filling the kettle, something that was instilled in my generation by our grandparents and was still practiced by my daughter when living in an old terraced property.

The Post WWII rush to fill every kitchen with aluminium saucepans, Jam boiling pans, and extolling the ease with which they could be cleaned by cooking your rhubarb in them.
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By Bodrighy
#561705
It's surprising we aren't all dead of something or other really Chas. As I get older I don't know whether to get more and more scared or simply go for the 'What the heck' attitude :lol: Maybe hat's where common sense used to come in. Now we have legislation instead :roll:

Pete
By duncanh
#561713
Interesting reading but I was surprised to see the listing for beech giving wood as a possible reaction source. I have a several spatulas and spoons in the kitchen made from it. Isn't it also regularly used for chopping boards? It does say it's not particularly potent, but it's common occurrence.
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By Bodrighy
#561718
duncanh wrote:Interesting reading but I was surprised to see the listing for beech giving wood as a possible reaction source. I have a several spatulas and spoons in the kitchen made from it. Isn't it also regularly used for chopping boards? It does say it's not particularly potent, but it's common occurrence.



I think they are a bit OTT on some of them myself but I suppose there have been occurrences so they add it. I mainly use beech or sycamore for anything to do with food as those are the woods I always deemed safest. Maybe we should all take up knitting, may be safer LOL

Pete
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By CHJ
#561733
I think there is a very big difference between handling/machining the woods in a poor work environment and the actual exposure you normally get in daily contact or use of a finished article. Fine Beech Dust coating your damp nasal passages or lungs which are designed to infuse chemicals is a bit more drastic than handling a finished piece with your hands that are designed to have a better natural barrier.

Think of the effects of a good chilli in the hand, then of the instant you forgot you handled it. :shock:

Iroko, causes no problems that I know of in window frames etc, causes some of us severe discomfort if we come into contact with freshly worked wood or dust and the associated released chemicals, and is bad enough to kill many native workers exposed to it in poorly regulated logging .
By brihol
#561840
I've recently used some South African tambootie wood to turn some pens with great results. I was disturbed to see the toxicity paragraph here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirostachys_africana
I guess I should ditch the offcuts or at least make sure they don't end up on the barbecue!!

Brian