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By lurker
#1175836
Rather than pea's up another thread:

What are folks thoughts on the shelf life of PVA glue?

Personally I use Ever build 502 (toolstation) as its fairly cheap and IMHO reliable.

What I do is leave it in the shed until the first frost, then the remainder gets dumped*
I then buy a new bottle decant maybe 200ml into an empty Hellmanns mayo bottle**.
Then in May the main bottle goes into the shed

*I was wondering if using this diluted when doing brick pointing might be a good idea ????

** https://www.tesco.com/groceries/product ... lsrc=aw.ds
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By ED65
#1175841
There are probably others but here's a relevant thread from 2016:
502-wood-glue-t100911.html

Stored right there's no reason that PVAs can't last for years. The oldest one I have might be just past its 20th birthday. It had slowly thickened to a much-too-thick consistency but otherwise seems fine.

Glues have to have shelf lives measured in years just to survive the chain of transport, storage and retail sales and then subsequent slow use by the consumer.
By Orraloon
#1175845
I have used it up to a tad over over 2 years old and not had any failures provided it's the right glue for the job. Where I live the temperature ranges from a few degrees below zero some winter nights to in excess of 40C in summer and humidity from about 10 to 99%. Could perhaps have tried for a bit longer but reckon a few bucks saved on glue is not worth a few hundred in a failed project. Never heard of it being used in brick pointing however. One obscure use I have used it for was sticking paper archery targets to cardboard backing. Mixed2 or 3 to one with water and applied with a wallpaper brush. It remains pliant where wallpaper paste dries brittle. I did not see it mattered but the old hands at the archery club claimed it was less abrasive on the arrows.
Regards
John
By phil.p
#1175849
ED65 wrote:There are probably others but here's a relevant thread from 2016:
502-wood-glue-t100911.html

Stored right there's no reason that PVAs can't last for years. The oldest one I have might be just past its 20th birthday. It had slowly thickened to a much-too-thick consistency but otherwise seems fine.

Glues have to have shelf lives measured in years just to survive the chain of transport, storage and retail sales and then subsequent slow use by the consumer.


I've just looked at a litre of D4. It states 6 months shelf life from date of manufacture - it was manufactured 1/17, hasn't been badly stored and is already deteriorating.
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By AndyT
#1175861
Maybe the temperature really does matter.
I don't live in Australia.
Cornwall has oddities that the rest of the UK doesn't. (I do mean the climate, I'm trying to stay on topic...)
However, I'm lucky enough to have a basement workshop where the year round temperature range is only about 14° in winter to 22° in summer.
I've never needed to adopt a buy-it-every year policy on glue - it lasts till it's finished which can be several years at my rate of work.
So it depends, and any manufacturer's recommendations will be based on a worst case and can easily be improved on if your storage conditions are favourable.
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By MikeG.
#1175872
I've found disturbing amounts of mould growing on PVA when stored for too long. I mean, the entire surface of the PVA is solid black. I'm inclined to believe their stated shelf times now, as a result.
By sunnybob
#1175880
I can testify D3 doesnt like extreme heat. It turns into instant stick superglue at 38c.
i havent kept any long enough to comment on aging though.
By biskit
#1175914
I've always used old pva glue up for pointing, and never had any problems with strength or cracking. Some as old as 5years, stored in a cool shed (frost free)
By phil.p
#1175925
Yes, my old stuff goes into mortar, on the concrete garage floor or on newly cut turnery blanks.
By Fergal
#1230516
I left some Toolstation D4 in the garage over the winter and the frost turned it into blancmange. It would still stick things together, but I wouldn't use it on anything important.
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By transatlantic
#1230520
I went to use my Everbuild PVA the other day. Unscrewed the top and it was like Mozzarella cheese. A big lump of soft 'ewwwww' surrounded by water.

From now on I'll be keeping a small squeezy bottle in the garage and the main tub indoors.
By phil.p
#1230528
I have D4 bought at the end of January (good new stock) that is beginning to stiffen.
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By custard
#1230531
ED65 wrote:Stored right there's no reason that PVAs can't last for years. The oldest one I have might be just past its 20th birthday.


:shock:

I guess that's what happens if you don't do any actual woodwork!
By Just4Fun
#1230540
ED65 wrote:Stored right there's no reason that PVAs can't last for years.

I think correct storage is key. I made the mistake of leaving a tube of PVA glue in my unheated workshop over the winter. Temperatures here can head south of -30C and when I came back to it in the spring the glue had a sort of chalky residue. I wouldn't use it. Since then I have kept my glue in the house where it lasts till I use it, but that is always within a few months. Less than a year anyway.