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I must have a go at one of these ...

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Richard T

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... one of these days.

We went to have a mooch about in St. Peter's church in Wootton Wawen yesterday, and so impressed was I by several bits of ancient wood work we went back today armed with camera on the way back from the bootsale.

This is the 13th century Parish chest.



For those who don't want to bother with dovetails this is the solution.





And in the same room is the Carrington Chest bound with the initials S and C.



This one is dovetailed as well.



So no getting out of it after all.
 

Tony Spear

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Richard T":ju6n2l3g said:
... one of these days.

We went to have a mooch about in St. Peter's church in Wootton Wawen yesterday, and so impressed was I by several bits of ancient wood work we went back today armed with camera on the way back from the bootsale.

So no getting out of it after all.
Ar, but did you measure the size, spacing and angles of all the dovetails, were they consistent or otherwise? :?:

I think we should know................ :wink:
 

AndyT

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Beautiful stuff - and they've lasted rather well!

I was admiring these on Saturday - perhaps when you've finished the chests you could knock up a pair of doors?



They're on the church in Tutbury - which dates back to 1086 - and I think the ironwork shows the same sort of inventive spirit.
 

kirkpoore1

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Nice chests. Sort of a medieval safe--too big to move, too tough to break into without somebody noticing. Kept the peasants from stealing the church's silver and the Pope's rents.:) The second one looks from here to be either a reproduction or a much, much later build. I've seen pictures of a number of these, and none had dovetails. In fact, dovetails, while present, seem to be pretty rare on medieval furniture, and when used are rarely evenly spaced that one is. And the locks are way too small for medieval ones.

You guys are lucky that you can walk down the street and see stuff like this.

I've met at least one blacksmith who can do work like that. A top guy in the profession, and he apparently makes a very decent living.

Kirk
 

RogerP

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It would be nice to know the age of the dovetailed chest. To me it doesn't look that old - the joint looks to regular, too fresh and not at all time worn. Any idea?
 

Harbo

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There was a programme on the BBC a few months back on Blacksmithing showing the evolution of this scroll work from early times to the modern day. Where it evolved from strictly security purposes to an art form used in the very ornate gates etc still produced today.
I have some photos of Egyptian boxes with very early DTs - difficult to access on my iPhone at the moment.

Rod
 

bugbear

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RogerP":1m2vvldc said:
...dovetailed chest. To me it doesn't look that old - the joint looks to regular, too fresh and not at all time worn.
Agreed. Whole thing look really clean and neat.

BugBear
 

Richard T

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It's difficult to date the later chest accurately (I should have paid more attention in church) but it was made for the Smith - Carringtons who were the local land owners and top chaps for 400 years before the 19th century. So I'm guessing it's 18th century.

Their ancestor, Lord Francis Smith who died in 1604, is still hanging around keeping his eye on the chest and his hand on the situation.



He's been there so long he's got ancient graffiti all over his wellies.



Here's another corner of it:



It looks in remarkably good nick for 18th century but I guess it has not been in constant use like the parish chest has, if used at all. Probably a staus thing.
 

Richard T

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That's a stunning door Andy. No such elaborate strap work on the Wootton Doors I'm afraid but I liked them nevertheless.

This is the north door - Tudor, having been moved slightly in the 17th century.



Those dead doornails in detail:





and from the other side:



Just very long strap hinges. But it's a very strong bit of Tudor two ply.
 

Harbo

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Perhaps it was subject to a Victorian restoration - they were always rebuilding things?

Heres the ancient Egyptian stuff - though I didn't find these down our street Kirk :)




There's some nice chests in Winchester Cathedral (near where I live) which contain bones of early saxons kings incl. Canute.
I must take some photos?

Rod
 

Togalosh

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The French & Spanish were/are good at all that fancy iron scroll work & beautiful doors.
(I feel better now knowing I'm not the only 1 going about taking pics of doors & joints.. there's something very appealing about doors).

In the Brum Museum & Art Gallery they have some excellent iron work..& an ancient Egyptian wooden shrine (?) held together with dowels..they've come a bit loose but have lasted +- 2000 years.
 
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