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Holly tree?

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gog64

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Hi all,

I’ve got a fair size holly tree to fell this week ahead of a landscaping project. There are three main stems at least 18-24 inch diameter.

is it worth trying to save any for turning? I’ve got a big jug of anchorseal that I use for slab / plank drying, but are there any other words of wisdom on drying holly? I will probably dry the timber in my barn, so am a little worried it will get HOT over the summer.
 

dickm

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Have tried in the past, and had problems with some sort of greyish staining despite doing all the right things. But if you want a really nice, if a bit featureless, wood for turning, it's well worth saving particularly in the size you quote which must be pretty rare.
 

peterw3035

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I've seen some amazing Holly turned green with incredible movement that you would not believe, not a crack in sight !!
 

adidat

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i had some 14" logs planked up in January that i cut in November, have been drying them out with a large fan in the shed. I've also had the grey staining isssue. and some splitting. I got rather excited when is was coming out of the sawmill as the ripples ect where beautiful!

but will be an interesting experiment in a year to see whats useable and how bad the staining is.

I was paid to chop it down and remove it, and the local fencing wholesaler planked it for me and was happy with a tray of choccies so hasnt cost me much.

Adidat
 

Cooper

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I watched a youtube, I think was recommended on another thread here, where the chap turned two interesting pots, which he had hollowed much wider inside than the neck from green holly.
On my way back from a walk in the park the other day, I came across a pile of logs a tree feller was about to dispatch, some were holly so I went back in the car to collect a couple. When I have a moment I intend to have a go on my logs and I think you should as well we can then compare outcomes!
Cheers
Martin
 

Roland

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We took out a holly tree two years ago, and cut it into 80cm lengths. I turned a couple of sections the same week. It was moving so quickly that it went oval in the time it took me to resharpen the gouge. Nevertheless I got some beautiful white bowls.

The rest of the log ends I painted, and let them season. A year later I turned some more. Here you can see the beautiful grain, and some traces of the grey fungus.

 

gog64

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I’ll give it a go, nothing to lose and it looks pretty nice from the pictures posted
 

KimG

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Holly is excellent turning timber, but also tricky to season as it is prone to split internally in large sections, also it tends to keep moving a lot too so is often unsuitable for boxes with lids (they fit for a short while then either shrink or expand and don't fit, at least that's been my experience) Still, for bowls or spindle work is pretty stable as long as it's well seasoned. Interesting comment about spoalting, I have not tried that, time to shove a lump or two into a bag of damp shavings for a few months then!
 

topchippyles

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I cut down an apple tree yesterday and have a decent trunk. Anyone used it for any projects in the past ?
 

KimG

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Most of the Apple wood I have used in the past has been pretty well seasoned, as such it is fine grained and very hard, takes fine detail well but can have erratic grain which means you need sharp tools and take fine cuts across such areas to avoid tear out or dig in, it's a really nice timber to turn with. Of course it also depends on what you intend to make with it as each piece will require a suitable approach.
 

nicko

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Hi, I've heard that Holly is a bit like Sycamore, it needs to be seasoned standing up (grain vertical) this stops the dark staining. Not tried it myself, but worth a try if storing to season anyway.
 

NOTTNICK

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It turns fairly easily but does need really careful drying as it cracks easily, I have had to discard quite a bit lately. I had fun dying a piece, it took the colour really well.
 

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NOTTNICK

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I love using apple, particularly live edge. With sharp tools it turns well and it does have interesting grain. I like the contrasting colours. I am just processing a particularly punky piece at the moment. A fair bit of rot, but wonderful patterns. I'll dry it carefully and see what happens.
 

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okeydokey

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I have some Holly that has been dead and dry for years still standing by leaning on others about 8" diameter at the largest, any good for chisel handles?
 

Dirtyepic

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I was given a holly tree in the condition of cutting it down. It’s been drying for a couple of years. In a garage. It has the grey stain and the hint of spalding in places. I turned a vase and a handle for a well loved cheese grater where the plastic handle died. It’s finishes really well.
 

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