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Cherry tree, fire wood, plank now, plank later?

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Fitzroy

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So 9 years after moving in, and declaring the middle of the lawn was a daft place for a tree, I chopped it down. I should have done it immediately as the lawn is now a mess of large roots. Anyhow!

Having cut it down, with my trusty 1908 air corp 6tpi rip saw, I’m left with a couple of bits of trunk. 1.5m long and about 15-20cm in diameter. Most of it looks to be sap wood.

So is it worth trying to plank it? I’ll have to make a sled for my Startrite 352, which I can do but will take some time and materials. Or should I just hack it up to season for firewood now?

Assuming it’s worth having a go at planking it. Do I do it now and put it in stick to season, or leave it some time and plank it later? If later, how much later? I’ve already slathered the ends in PVA.

Handsaw takedown!
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Lots of sapwood.
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Two sticks to stick or burn?
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The smallest boule ever.
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Thanks for any help.

Fitz.
 

Roland

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Now! The cherry will already have stared cracking. With that diameter I’d just split it once down the centre
 

Fitzroy

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I took the one reply as a definite yes, it should be planked up. I took some head scratching but I decided in the end to flatten a face and perpendicular edge on the planer. This gave me a steady shape to put through the bandsaw.
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Seem to have lost the saw photo but i installed a new 3tpi extra set blade from tuffsaws. The blade cut well, coping with the wet saw dust, although a good clean of accumulation was needed mid way.
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I sawed most of the boards at an inch thick, except for the very base of the trunk which was 20” long and I sawed 2” thick. Thinking I may get chair or coffee table legs from it.

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The final boards all cut and stickered looking for a new home.
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They have been tucked somewhere somewhat covered up and well weighed down. In a year or two we’ll see if it was worth the effort.
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The green wood on the planer made a bloody damp mess and it, along with the bandsaw, needed a thorough clean and oil at the end of it all.
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Unorthodox approach but happy with the outcome and a fun learning experience.

Fitz.
 

Inspector

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When I have had to take down a tree like that I dig out the roots and cut them such that the tree comes down where I want it and pulls the stump at the same time. Cut the branches on the side away from where you want it to go. While it is still some work it is lots easier than digging the stump out later or waiting years for it to rot away.

For that I would not have made boards. They will cup a lot as they dry and you won't get much yield. Throw the ones with the pith back on the bandsaw and cut down the length of the pith. They will crack a lot around it if you don't and seal the ends with whatever paint you have, coat them with glue or dip them in hot wax. Lotta work making lumber isn't it? ;)

Pete
 

ncollar

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Pete
Another thing to put on the ends for drying is just lard. Rub a nice smear on it and let it dry with a lot less end split.
Good luck and happy boarding. Lumber is quite costly and the satisfaction on get from start to finish makes it all worth it.
Nelson
 
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