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Yorkshire grit?

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Spence

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It's alright, I think it's essentially a wax with little crystals in or something. I'm not sure how It works but it seems to really smooth out the surface once you get into higher grit sanding.

Alot of the time I just use beeswax though as its very simple and cheap from an apiarist friend who has big blocks of it.

Hampshire sheen is good too and Martin makes coloured finishes too.
 

Lazurus

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As said it is a good quality wax with a form of abrasive grit inside, this grit gradually breaks down getting finer and finer a little like running through the abrasive paper grits, only takes a few seconds to get a super fininsh. I use it a lot and really rate it on hard wood and acrylic, easy to apply and good results.
 

Stiggy

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Yorkshire Grit contains pumice and is extremely sexy stuff!

I use it a lot, depending on what finish I’m using, saves me from putting on a coat of danish oil base coat and removes those tiny scratches in one go.

:D
 

Dalboy

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Remember that it is wax-based so no good if you want to apply different finishes on top. Great if you intend to use another wax product
 

Sideways

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Used it for my daughter's xmas present a week back. A flying saucer bowl in Mick Hanbury's style. The wax was used for the unpainted centre and back of the piece.
Started by sanding through 3 grades of abranet, then switched to Yorkshire grit and topped off with a light coat of Renaissance (microcrystalline) wax because I had some handy.
It produced a super smooth finish and she was very happy :)
 
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I've only just started using it, but I find that it almost acts as a finish itself. I applied it to some oak and not only did it end up looking like a smooth wax finish, but it also darkened the wood too. So bear that in mind.


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Phil Pascoe

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I wouldn't think (from the h. w. oils I've used) that that would work. They are designed for bare wood as they penetrate, and the work shouldn't be finished to that sort of fineness anyway.
 

Paul Hannaby

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There are a few brands of abrasive waxes which are a mix of wax and pumice/rotten stone. Both these can be bought separately so you could always make your own with a wax of your choice.
They have their place but I would avoid using them on any open grained wood (such as oak, ash, elm, chestnut etc.) because the grit will get lodged in the pores and can't be removed.
 

CHJ

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Paul Hannaby":33ivkp1k said:
…..
They have their place but I would avoid using them on any open grained wood (such as oak, ash, elm, chestnut etc.) because the grit will get lodged in the pores and can't be removed.
Even on closer grained wood I personally believe they are better used on a sealed and pore filled surface as a combined de-nibbing and waxing process.
I can't believe that centuries of applying surface sealing coatings such as shellac and various resins to wood prior to wax polishing evolved if simply applying wax to unsealed bare wood was an enduring finish long term on something subjected to handling.

To my way of thinking it's as Paul says, using it on unsealed wood is tantamount to wet sanding with a finishing oil where you are deliberately filling the open pores with the resultant wood dust slurry but in this case imbedding wax coated grit.

I have proved this myself as I have a sample of such a product that used a dark grey abrasive; it looks OK on a man made material or dark wood such as Walnut, but on anything like unsealed Beech or Sycamore it leaves a dirty grey cast similar in appearance to that which you get from Beech etc. contaminated with black mould.
Grit_Wax.jpg
 

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I've been doing the following on Oak :

- abrade to 320 grit
- apply sanding sealer (I use cellulose), and wait till dry, denib
- yorkshire grit
- microcrystalline Wax, wait till dry, buff

wouldn't the sealer fill the pores?
 

CHJ

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transatlantic":1z4m6jgb said:
I've been doing the following on Oak :

- abrade to 320 grit
- apply sanding sealer (I use cellulose), and wait till dry, denib
- yorkshire grit
- microcrystalline Wax, wait till dry, buff

wouldn't the sealer fill the pores?
On an open pored wood like Oak I would expect it to seal the sides of the 'valleys' (for want of a better word) in the large pores but not to fill them to such an extent to provide a flush surface.

But sealing is certainly better than not doing so, you don't really want paste wax with varying degrees of unevaporated volatiles penetrating the wood surface, I suspect if you look at your Oak under magnification you will see the pale grit residue in the open pores.

At least that has been my experience with equivalent products, but probably not of any visual significance if you are happy with the finish.
 

Robbo3

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At one of our all day events, the demonstrator, Ian Durrant, displayed two long tables of his work & nearly everybody commented on the quality of his finishing, so much so that after lunch he explained his method.
He used three coats of sanding sealer. The first, when dry, was sanded back to bare wood. This he said filled the pores. The second coat was applied & again sanded back. This leveled the surface. The third coat was applied & denibbed followed by finish of choice.
 

ScaredyCat

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What's the difference between Yorkshire Grit and Hampshire Sheen ?

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ScaredyCat":3j1ulmqn said:
What's the difference between Yorkshire Grit and Hampshire Sheen ?

.
Hampshire Sheen is more of a brand (covering waxes, oils, sealers etc)

I assume you mean Hampshire Sheen Original Paste Wax (or the high gloss), which is as its says, a paste wax. Yorkshire Grit is an abrasive paste.
 

alexf

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Yorkshire Grit is an abrasive paste, Yes it has wax and oil in it but it is used like sandpaper. not a finishing coat. Hampshire Sheen is a wax finish and is used as a polish
 

Richard_C

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Freddie Truman vs David Gower*

Abrasive destroyer vs elegant and smooth. You need both.

* Wrong county they all shout - ah yes but finished career at Hampshire.
 

HappyPixie

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Yorkshire Grit is the abrasive and Hampshire Sheen is the wax finish after you've abraded the surface smooth. I go by their instructions and sand seal the raw wood after 320 grit, then Yorkshire Grit and then Hampshire Sheen. The latter is not too high gloss - in my experience. I also have Microcrystalline Wax which gives a higher gloss after a few coats.
 
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