Yet another shedshop Mike's way. Ish

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Molynoox

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I have no experience of dual pitched roof design so I will leave it for others to comment but I would like to say that fusion seems to give much nicer looking output than SketchUp does. I have tried to find a plugin for SketchUp that does a half decent job but I haven't been able to figure it out. I wonder if I could import a SketchUp model to fusion, just to get the nice looking output...
Enjoying your progress on this one.
Martin
 

aphillippe

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I have no experience of dual pitched roof design so I will leave it for others to comment but I would like to say that fusion seems to give much nicer looking output than SketchUp does. I have tried to find a plugin for SketchUp that does a half decent job but I haven't been able to figure it out. I wonder if I could import a SketchUp model to fusion, just to get the nice looking output...
Enjoying your progress on this one.
Martin
That’s just a screenshot of the design interface. It also does nice renders with materials and lighting and such. If you can do sketchup, fusion shouldn’t be much of a leap. It’s the same ‘sketch then extrude, repeat’ solid modelling paradigm. I find the precision you can get in fusion is much more accessible, especially designing for 3D printing. And parametric dimensions are amazing. I haven’t spent much time in sketchup though
 

Molynoox

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That’s just a screenshot of the design interface. It also does nice renders with materials and lighting and such. If you can do sketchup, fusion shouldn’t be much of a leap. It’s the same ‘sketch then extrude, repeat’ solid modelling paradigm. I find the precision you can get in fusion is much more accessible, especially designing for 3D printing. And parametric dimensions are amazing. I haven’t spent much time in sketchup though

cheers. I have actually tried it a while ago and there were certainly bits that I loved. I didn't get on with it for architecture / landscape design though which is what I want 3D for mainly. I found if I was creating a single component (like a single building, or just a random object like an engine) then it was fine (brilliant even with the parametric stuff). But as soon as I added multiple buildings, and a surface / garden etc, I found that fusion just get into such a huge mess that it was unusable. I am sure its possible but not with my brain I don't think. Also, if you look around, nobody is using fusion for architecture / landscapes, that probably says a lot, so I switched to sketchup at that point.
Im still temped by fusion. very tempted
Martin
 

aphillippe

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cheers. I have actually tried it a while ago and there were certainly bits that I loved. I didn't get on with it for architecture / landscape design though which is what I want 3D for mainly. I found if I was creating a single component (like a single building, or just a random object like an engine) then it was fine (brilliant even with the parametric stuff). But as soon as I added multiple buildings, and a surface / garden etc, I found that fusion just get into such a huge mess that it was unusable. I am sure its possible but not with my brain I don't think. Also, if you look around, nobody is using fusion for architecture / landscapes, that probably says a lot, so I switched to sketchup at that point.
Im still temped by fusion. very tempted
Martin
Yes, it’s definitely product/component focused rather than large projects like architecture
 

MikeJhn

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Getting back to the build, why the rafter hangers at the ridge? not needed if the rafters are cut correctly and braced between either side, and the cut needed to place the rafter onto a horizontal takes away some of the strength of the rafter.

I still use a drawing board, T and Set square, much too old to learn new skills, except I do touch type. 🤣
 
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aphillippe

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Getting back to the build, why the rafter hangers at the ridge? not needed if the rafters are cut correctly and braced between either side, and the cut needed to place the rafter onto a horizontal takes away some of the strength of the rafter.

I still use a drawing board, T and Set square, much too old to learn new skills, except I do touch type. 🤣
I was thinking those angled hangers, so no cut needed. But changed my mind when I saw the cost. £8 each. I figured it would make placing and nailing/screwing a bit easier. So they’ve gone out the window
 

MikeJhn

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Piece of triangular ply wood notched for the ridge beam and square twisted nailed to the rafters, but do make sure the rafters are butted tight to the ridge beam.
 

aphillippe

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Roof is up, starting to feel like a building now...
IMG_1665.JPEG

I just realised I didn't take any pictures between the rafters going up and the OSB going on. More pictures in between stages next time.

I did take some pictures of this jig I knocked together to cut the birdsmouth with the circular saw (just using the mitre saw as a temporary saw horse, plenty of clearance under the workpiece despite appearances). I'm sure there's probably a better way of doing it but this seemed to work...
IMG_1660.JPEG

IMG_1661.JPEG
 

aphillippe

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So now working out what to do with the membrane and battens on the roof. I was planning on membrane on the OSB and then vertical battens (to allow any water to run off) and then cross-battens to mount the Onduline. But do I really need battens? Onduline documentation says you can mount direct to the OSB but I can't find any mention of OSB plus membrane.
 

mikej460

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For an outbuilding roof I installed T&G sarking (which is what your OSB3 is) then vertical battens then membrane (ensuring the membrane sags a little in between battens) then horizontal counter battens then the covering (in my case red cedar shingles). I would be nervous fitting onduline direct to the OSB3 as it may not allow enough ventilation to remove condensation or rain ingress. With onduline you have the problem of ingress via fixing holes and overlaps (especially in driving rain). Don't forget venting at the ridge.
 

MikeJhn

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Onduline are a manufacturer and make all sorts of roof coverings, what are you considering using, corrugated or flat?

 

aphillippe

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Onduline are a manufacturer and make all sorts of roof coverings, what are you considering using, corrugated or flat?

Sorry, I’d be using the full corrugated panels, Onduline Classic.
 

MikeJhn

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The timber used in your internal truss's would be better utilised as cross brace's to your rafters.
 

aphillippe

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Life has been getting in the way a little, progress has not been as rapid as I had hoped.

Wrap is on...
IMG_1708.JPEG
IMG_1683.JPEG

It went reasonably smoothly, and managed to get the whole shed covered with about 10cm of spare left over from the 50m roll. 😅


Roof's on...

IMG_1742.JPG

IMG_1721.JPEG

IMG_1718.JPEG


I didn't have a roof ladder or anything so I couldn't reach much further than a single tile width (900mm), so I needed to do each side of the roof and the ridge tile, working my way along, one sheet at a time.

IMG_1723.JPEG

(story stick for marking nail placement)

And window's in...

IMG_1727.JPEG


I'll be battening this weekend and hopefully cladding next weekend. Then just a door and I'm water tight
 

MikeJhn

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Just in case you don't know, always put a vertical batten on any corner to butt the end grain of the cladding against, reduces the exposure and looks better as well.
 

Molynoox

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Just in case you don't know, always put a vertical batten on any corner to butt the end grain of the cladding against, reduces the exposure and looks better as well.
Sounds sensible but how do you fix to a corner, isn't it always going to be at the edge of one of the sides?
Not sure if I'm being clear....
 

MikeJhn

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Sorry wrong description, probably need a 4 x 2 or whatever works for the size of your cladding batten plus cladding.
 

Jameshow

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2x2 will normally sort if it is 20mm cladding and 25mm batten.

You can screw into the batten rather than the edge grain of the cladding.

Or you can get capping that goes over the top and covers end grain.
 
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