Quantcast

Yes, it's bad, buying my own kitchen instead of making one..

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

the_g_ster

Established Member
Joined
4 Feb 2006
Messages
284
Reaction score
0
Location
Portsmouth
Hello

In the past I have had the time to make my own kitchen, even a french butchers block thanks to the inspiration of somebody on here too.

I have now moved house, and am looking at a kitchen extension that I have started myself and am so far up to the finished brick level.

Looking at kitchens to buy, won't have time to make one.

DIY kitchens, look good, but all that money for MFC and 8m backer boards, so can't do.
Naked Kitchens, look great, but not cheap.

Any flatpack quality outfits out there?

I am not fussed about assembling myself, but I am going to feel sick if I end up have to go with something that is MFC rather than scandinavian birch ply with dominos and a poplar face frame that I have made.

Any input welcome
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
2,857
Reaction score
269
Location
Edinburgh
Ask phil.p if you can have Dr Bob as your secret santa. Apparently it appears we have convinced him to give his SS a kitchen :). Though in all seriousness, if you are willing to fork out for a "proper" made kitchen then perhaps talk to Dr Bob
 

stuartpaul

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2003
Messages
988
Reaction score
3
Location
Somerset
the_g_ster":2v0xfvzj said:
Any flatpack quality outfits out there?
Isn't that what's called an oxymoron? :D

More along the lines of any flatpack kitchens that aren't complete and utter carp? As far as I'm aware they're all chipboard/MFC just in variable quality (and I don't think MFC is that bad when used appropriately).

I've put quite a few in and once put together and screwed to the wall they're all pretty much the same. Longer term it's the fixtures and fittings that tend to wear out.

Birch ply flatpack? Good luck finding one of those and please post here if you find one 'cos I'd be interested as well.
 

lurker

Le dullard de la commune
Joined
2 Mar 2007
Messages
5,403
Reaction score
47
Location
Leicestershire
As Stuart Paul says, once they are in, they are all the same.

Spend your money on Blum fittings and decent fronts and tops.

I bought carcasses from b n q :shock: :shock: :shock: in their jan sales about five years ago and they have been fine. I think they were less than the cost of wood.

If I was doing it again I would at least have a look at IKEA.
 

Geoff_S

Established Member
Joined
12 Sep 2017
Messages
683
Reaction score
2
Location
London
Yes, I did look into this when I did my kitchen. It's quite depressing.

Buy cheap. you get cheap. Buy expensive, and you can still get cheap. Comments like "well sir, we only use 18mm for the cabinets, unlike the cheaper brands" made me sigh. Yes, it's 20% thicker but why is your price 300% thicker?

I made it myself in the end, hated the process but really pleased with the end result.

Have you tried Howdens? They only deal with trade so if you're not you will need to find a mate in the trades. My nephew uses them all the time, not that I'm suggesting that is a recommendation in itself. I've seen his work and it looks very good and the Howdens kitchens look OK.
 

sammy.se

Established Member
Joined
3 Aug 2014
Messages
1,195
Reaction score
38
Location
London
I was at a trade show recently (home builders or something). One of the kitchen salesmen was telling me that 'they don't use chipboard, it high density particle board'.

I googled it and as far as I could tell it was the same thing as chipboard. Is that the case, or is there something out there that is 'High density Particle board'?

I'm interested in the difference of opinion on chipboard, since we know Dr Bob's work is high quality, and he is totally comfortable using chipboard. So is this a form of 'snobery' when we don't like chipboard carcases?

Maybe building your own carcasses out of high quality chipboard sheets that you buy yourself is better than the kitchen suppliers?

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

Rich C

Established Member
Joined
22 Aug 2019
Messages
337
Reaction score
10
Location
Manchester
Interesting thread. We're looking at a new kitchen soon, but would like slightly higher than usual units (worktop height of 100cm). This looks like it will be expensive, I assume none of the normal lot will do custom sizes...
 

Mark Hancock

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2007
Messages
946
Reaction score
3
Location
Worcestershire
Did my kitchen recently and ended up going down the flat pack route from Magnet. All quotes for assembled didn't allow for the modifications I was looking for e.g. reducing the back where the service area wasn't needed. So assembled myself, reinforced backs and modified to suit the space. As a consequence got 3 more cupboards rather than the space fillers offered in quotes. Once in as others have said you wouldn't know the difference.
 

That would work

Established Member
Joined
29 Dec 2018
Messages
600
Reaction score
9
Location
Dartford
Similar thoughts myself recently.
Wanted a traditional framed beaded style. Painted finish.
Usual mental juggling of cost/time/pride/partner.
So in the end I used 18mm carcases from a well known outlet and made 44mmx18mm frames (biscuit jointed) with a bead around openings and normal m&t framed doors, butt hinged. Planted the frames on the front of the carcases. Very happy with the result.
 

the_g_ster

Established Member
Joined
4 Feb 2006
Messages
284
Reaction score
0
Location
Portsmouth
Re using MFC, I guess the issue there is knowing what it's like to work with, fixing into and breaking out etc. Perhaps it's my own education that's needed to understand where it works and to make sure anything fixed to it stays that way.

Egger Board looks to be well thought of, and is MFC.

Brich ply is so easy to work with when used before, though need to get finish right.

I
stuartpaul":4mtppufd said:
the_g_ster":4mtppufd said:
Any flatpack quality outfits out there?
Isn't that what's called an oxymoron? :D l.
Like it, you're right.

If the consensus is that a case is a case, and just need it to be stable then I like the idea of knocking up or finding fronts that can make it look good, and adapting some stuff to Blum.

Dr Bob, that name rings a bell from when I used to be on here, will see if I can get on his secret santa list.

Where's good for face fronts then?

Is there a niche market here for custom flatpack?

Thanks all for responses so far.
 

Trainee neophyte

[Insert witty and amusing title here]
Joined
12 Apr 2019
Messages
2,151
Reaction score
59
Location
Greece
I was thinking about your conundrum today, and I have a cunning plan: buy any old cheap, nasty kitchen as a stop-gap. Cheaper the better. You will hate it. You will loathe it. At some point in the not too distant future you will have a plumbing issue, and it will disolve. At this point you will have enough time to make a real one, probably. The cunning part of this is that you get an interim kitchen now, but the savings on making your own will more than outweigh buying the new cheap thing,and you will be forced to make your own because you will have bought such an awful kitchen in the first place. You end up with your own quality kitchen, and have somewhere to make tea in the interim, until you can get around to making your own.

If you buy a "quality" off the peg job, you will live with it for much longer before you rip it out, and it will cost you an arm and a leg. You will still rip it out, though.
 

Setch

Established Member
Joined
18 Jan 2009
Messages
514
Reaction score
9
Location
London UK
Rich C":bgp3rl4o said:
Interesting thread. We're looking at a new kitchen soon, but would like slightly higher than usual units (worktop height of 100cm). This looks like it will be expensive, I assume none of the normal lot will do custom sizes...

I did this, by having all the legs stand on a 100mm timber bearer, then using custom plinths cut from colour matched MFC. I used DIY kitchens, and they'll sell you an 8x4 sheet of MFC to match your doors/carcasses. Finished worktop height is far more comfortable.

This also left me with a bit more room under the plinths which I use for storage of items which only get used occasionally.
 

doctor Bob

Established Member
Joined
22 Jun 2011
Messages
3,580
Reaction score
133
Location
Matching Green
Just to put the record straight.
We use whatever the client wants as carcase material, so cost wise it goes MFC, veneers, birch ply, veneered birch ply, Compressed rhino scrotums.

Most clents will be sensible and opt for a combination, such as MFC on basic cabinets with birch ply in wet cabinets (sink and dishwasher areas) and veneers in show cabinets (larders, worktop mounted cabinets, drinks cabinets).

MFC is a great product, we only use Egger, I can tell the difference with content when cutting compared to Kronorspan or other makes, much less binding on the saw and metal / waste content.
Why put veneers in a drawer pack carcase or a pullout bin carcase, much better to use the money else where.
But at the end of the day it's the clients budget. We do lots of birch ply and veneer kitchens.

P.S. so far no one has ordered a compressed rhino scrotum kitchen carcase.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,457
Reaction score
281
Location
Pembrokeshire
doctor Bob":1j60casv said:
P.S. so far no one has ordered a compressed rhino scrotum kitchen carcase.
I've never tried it myself, heard many good things.
 

Rich C

Established Member
Joined
22 Aug 2019
Messages
337
Reaction score
10
Location
Manchester
Setch":1e6an36v said:
Rich C":1e6an36v said:
Interesting thread. We're looking at a new kitchen soon, but would like slightly higher than usual units (worktop height of 100cm). This looks like it will be expensive, I assume none of the normal lot will do custom sizes...

I did this, by having all the legs stand on a 100mm timber bearer, then using custom plinths cut from colour matched MFC. I used DIY kitchens, and they'll sell you an 8x4 sheet of my to match your doors/carcasses. Finished worktop height is far more comfortable.

This also left me with a bit more room under the plinths which I use for storage of items which only get used occasionally.
How do you get storage under the plinths?
 

AES

Established Member
Joined
18 Feb 2011
Messages
4,298
Reaction score
89
Location
Switzerland, near Basel
@doctor Bob:

If I send you a dimensioned sketch can I have a quote for a kitchen on compressed rhino scrotum (BUT the cabinet fronts and worktops MUST be powdered alligator horn)? Installation not required.
 

Setch

Established Member
Joined
18 Jan 2009
Messages
514
Reaction score
9
Location
London UK
Rich C":1kgdfkwp said:
How do you get storage under the plinths?
I was lazy, and just screwed some pallet strapping to the back of the plinth, so i can easily pull it out, then stash stuff in boxes between the cabinet legs. Not as user friendly as drawers, but fine for stuff which is rarely used. Eg: I order coffee beans in bulk and store the excess under the plinth, so I pull a bag out on see a month or so.
 

Latest posts

Top