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Anonymous

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Hi,

I want to join a postformed kitchen worktop, and try to make a reasonable joint instead of using a metal strip. Can somebody elucidate to this silly person what looks increasingly like a dark art?

Firstly, why a router to make the cut? Can't that be done with a mitre saw? (I own neither, but will buy what's necessary, and was just thinking that a mitre saw might be more generally useful ...maybe not.)

Secondly what are all these routed recesses or bolt holes or whatever going on underneath, and why do you need a router and £100 jig for them? Couldn't you just chisel out a recess for a couple of metal brackets to be screwed in?

Square
 

Manny

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Think it would have to be a pretty big mitre saw to cut 600mm plus. The routed recesses are to take the bolts that when tightened pull the two surfaces together, you don't need a jig to cut those, but a jig and router gives the best looking result for a post formed edge.
If you don't want to go down that path why not get a solid wood square edge w/top - It'll probably look better.
I did one for a client recently - Ikea beech w/top no need for a jig, it looked good and she was pleased with result.
 

johnelliott

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So, what sort of joint is it going to be? Straight as in extending a length, or right angled for a corner?
If it is a right angle then you really need the jig, because otherwise you would need to cut a mitred joint (and waste 600mm plus of material) or if you tried to join a two pieces at a right angle then the curved edge (postformed) would leave a gap.
The jig cuts a short mitre (to get over the curved edge problem) then a straight line to avoid material wastage
I wouldn't fancy trying to chisel out three worktop connector bolts, easier to do some overtime at work to pay for the hire of the right kit
John
 

Aragorn

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There's just no way to do with kind of joint successfully without the jig and a good high-powered ½" collet router with a long ½" straight cutting bit.
The bolt recesses can be cut easily enough by boring a large hole in the right place and chiseling out the rest, but why would you want to when you've got hold of the jig and a router!!
 
A

Anonymous

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Manny,

Ok, thanks. I thought one of those sliding mitre saws might be up to 600mm...obviously not.

I've already ordered the worktop from Wickes.

John,

Yes, it's a right angle. I don't really understand what you mean about waste and needing to cut a mitre if doing it without a jig. Isn't the jig for a "mason's mitre"? But anyway, I still can't get it into my brain why one couldn't do the shorts cuts for the rounded edges with a hand saw, and the long straight ones with a circular saw + some kind of fence arrangement (I haven't got a circular saw either, yet. lol). And I obviously need this video!

Neil,

Funny thing is, I tried to order this video from "tooled-up.com.", but their web site gave errors, and then on the phone they kept me hanging on until I hung up in a huff! .. only then to discover that they were the only people I could find selling it. I refused to go back out of shear bloody mindedness. So, excellent!....will order from Trend tomorrow.

Aragorn,

Hmm..looks like I need a router then. ;-) Will get one. Although, if, as I read somewhere here, the jigs are approx £30 a day to hire, then that's almost as annoying as £100 to buy - least you own it! :)

Will look at these polypropylene ones first ..unless anyone thinks their not up to it....

Thanks everybody.

Square
 

johnjin

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Hi Square
Have a look at this site www.hendersons.co.uk
They have the drawings and explanation of how to use these jigs and also sell them for only 42.50 pounds. They also sell the connecting bolts as well and the router cutter that you would need
Best of luck

John
 

Aragorn

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Square
Just a thought. Is your motivation here to just get the worktop in and looking nice? Or do you want to start doing kitchens more regularly? Or do you want to get into general woodworking?
Reason I ask is that if it's the first option, it may be better economy to get a kitchen fitter along. Around my way they charge around £50 for a mitre. It would take him/her about half an hour all done. Else, find a general carpenter/woodworker-type with the necessary tools and jig who may be charging half that.
If it's the second option - you need to buy decent kit.
If it's the third option - it may be better to read some of the other posts on getting started and buy a more considered selection of tools! (That was quite delicately put, right?! :wink: )
 
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Anonymous

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Johnjin,

Thanks a lot for the link; only glanced at it so far , but that will illuminate things.

Aragorn,

Good questions. I want to do it myself. When I first posted here sometime ago, I'd just got the urge to do some woodwork, and started making joints out of scraps of wood - don't know why, woke up one morning with the urge. Then thought maybe woodwork could be an earner - which was quickly dispelled when I saw how cheap mass produced furniture was. I haven't really got the room for a workshop at the moment- it's a Workmate squeezed into spare room +drill, jig saw and a set of chisels etc. Although I do need a circular saw for general diy, and had thought of routers as more specialist tools - decorative edges etc., I just couldn't see why it had to be done with a router. I suspect that the idiocy of my suggestions may be less to do with lack of consideration and more to do with idiocy. ;-) Example: the information John (Elliot) provided in relation to the mitre has now percolated through my brain overnight, and I now think I understand what he meant about waste with a "mitre" as oppose to a "mason's mitre" - thanks John.

Now to decide which router and circular saw...

Thanks all
Square
 

Aragorn

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Well good on you for trying it yourself! :D
A router is best suited to the job because its direction of cut (horizontal plane) doesn't chip the laminate surface of the worktop. A jigsaw or circular saw cuts in the vertical plane and so would rip through the laminate causing terrible chipping.
So when cutting your worktop to length with the circular saw, make sure the worktop is upside down!

Have a look at the polls on this site for suggestions about routers and circulars.
Best of luck!
 

johnelliott

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Aragorn":n1j9kd9f said:
. A jigsaw or circular saw cuts in the vertical plane and so would rip through the laminate causing terrible chipping.
Jigsaw blades which cut on the downstroke will help to reduce the chipping to the minimum. I have tried them but they make the jigsaw difficult to control because the thrust is upwards.
When I bought a new Makita jigsaw recently it came with a couple of blades where the top few teeth point down, and the rest point up. These are so good I ordered some more.
I agree that a router is the only way to get a really good edge on laminate worktop
John
 

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