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Aragorn

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Just interested....
Especially since most posters here seem to be amateur...
How much of your woodworking time do you reckon you spend working on your workshops themselves (fittings, cabinets, jigs etc) as opposed to working on projects?
Ta!
 

Chris Knight

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Aragorn,

Interesting question! I used to spend a huge amount of time on workshop stuff when I started woodworking and as the shop evolved and my needs became clearer, necessitating reworking of earlier ideas. I used to "reward myself" by making something for the shop that made life easier, after completing a non-workshop project.

Now that my shop is bursting at the seams, the only thing I want is more space and anything I do related to the shop is aimed at creating more usable space - this includes chucking out things that I made in the past - fancy jigs that I will never use again, the odd lemon in tools, wood scraps and so forth.

By far the greatest aid to space creation was to put everything on mobile bases. The trouble with this is that everything gets moved about so much, it is like living in a perpetual house move and that is not relaxing! I look back with fond memories to those halcyon days when I pondered what to fill a particular space with!

I guess that nowadays I spend less than 5% of my time on pure shop stuff. Specific one-off jigs needed for a particular project not included.
 
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Anonymous

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That is interesting Aragorn

I only get to play in the garage every second weekend or so for about 4 hours :(
I guess 50% of my time is jigs etc and 50% furniture. Veeeerrrry slow.

However, after a couple of years and one house move I have nearly sorted the garage and all heavy machines are on mobile bases so should change this to a 90/10% split soon:)

Cheers

Tony
 

Alf

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Yikes! :shock: If I was 'Murrican I'd be taking the fifth at this point... 'Nuff said. :oops: :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Who said anything about projects / furnitute……… It’s a full time vocation acquiring and setting up gear, then having to reorganise the shop to fit everything in and improve the workflow, then making jigs, then buying another machine, then surfing web to see how others are getting on etc..
Meanwhile, the baby has fledged into a toddler and no longer needs the crib, SWMBO has learned to improvise and the last load of iroko just needs another little while laid up.

Don't have to rush things .......
 

Adam

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For me, it's about 0-5%. I simply haven't got space to store any fancy jigs or bits and bobs - so I never make any. The lack of space inside the workshop means I don't have to worry about making "shop" cabinets to store things in, as their isn't space for those either. I did make a holder for my pencils, which was 6 holes in a piece of wood, and I made a shelf for all the associated bits for a woodrat...what I find is that having multiple hobbies is the problem. For example I played squash this evening (early) and then spend the next 2 hours dismantling honeycomb from a beehive out of the wooden frames, ready for melting. Does making your own beeswax for furniture making/rubbing under planes count? :shock: I'll post you some if you want!
 

Bean

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Mmmmmm maybe 20% as I am just getting sorted with storage for tools, and I only have a few power tools (messy things dust everywhere). But once I have finished the current Project and Just before I start the next I guess it may be 80% on storage.

Bean
 

Dewy

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I see the clock on here is 2 hours fast. :D Time 10.38pm 24th feb

Right now I spend more time designing the workshop benches, tables etc than actually making them.
I have found that I think of possible problems in the future so change my plans accordingly.
When able to work I think I spend more time making jigs etc than actual projects.
It doesn't matter, it's the doing that counts not the completion.
 

SquareCircle

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Posted as guest above. I'll get the hang of this yet. Nice to konw that I am not the only onve who can't seem to make thinks quick.

Didn't mention the other hobbies. Is it possible to play golf and do woodwork (and get to know your kids)
 

Noel

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"My shop helps me relax, makes me feel better (more "up" I guess you would say), and helps ease the headache. It is enough sometimes just to know it is there, that it's mine. Sometimes I go out there for hours making something, sometimes I just piddle around, sometimes I do a little and then just sit for awhile, and sometimes all I do is just sit, listen to music, smell the sawdust, watch the birds and squirrels, and don't think about anything much at all."

This sums it up for me.
Thanks to JOAT from the wreck. (Ask Alf))

Rgds

Noel
 

Noel

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Squarecircle,

It is quite possible to play golf and woodwork. Making a living kinda gets in the way sometimes....

Rgds

Noel
 

Steve

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Don't ask questions like that fer chrissakes! SWMBO might be peeking over me shoulda!
 

Philly

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Aragorn,
The classic question-how come I spend all that time in the workshop but nothing comes out of it?
I beat myself up about this a lot-it's easy to spend an hour sharpening, tweaking a jig, making a new base for equipment, updating, updating, etc.....
And then there's buying NEW tools.......
Personally, I now force myself to build furniture (at least most of the time :twisted: )
As regards how much time- I keep a "shop diary" to try and keep tabs on how long projects actually take, and on average I spend 6 hours a week, evenings mainly, with the odd Saturday splurge!!
regards,
Philly
 

dedee

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Working on shop items has certainly given me the opportunity to practice eg the DTs on my tool cabinet. In the 2 years it has taken to nearly finish this item I have made a myriad of small toys, puzzles and a couple of scrollsawn name plates and some kitchen cabinet remodelling.

I am not too concerned what I am working on so long as I am doing something. At best I get about 4 hours at the weekend but with the gardening season now upon & us this will decrease dramatically until next Autumn.

AndyP
 

CYC

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Chris & Tony, you say you have every machinery mobile, I am just making a base for my drillpress and morticer and I am undecided on which castors to use, well where to get them at a good price :wink:

Can you tell me where you got yours, at what price and are they good and stable?
 
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Anonymous

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Hi CYC

I live near Leicester and nipped to the Machinemart in the centre. Castors are tough (industrial) and cheap. No brake + 30mm(ish) wheel are about £3 and generally if you look at B&Q's castors, double the quality and half the money you'll be in the right ball park.

I do find the brakes not too useful unless they're on all 4 corners but fixed this with a piece of wood thrown behind the mchen and touching the wall to prevent movement.

I have my Kity, bandsaw and router table on them and it makes a hell of a difference when workng in the garage. I hope to post some piccies of the workshop at some time but hven't figured out how to post 'em yet!!!

see http://www.machinemart.co.uk/search.asp?q=castor

Cheers

Tony
 

Chris Knight

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CYC,

For a couple of machines I have used these http://www.axminster.co.uk/default.asp?part=MMBWFL

but the second one I got from Axminster was not such good quality as the first and I had to reinforce it to carry my machine (not a very heavy one). I complained to Axminster and got a nice ltter back but I do not know if they have upgraded the bases again.

For another machine I have used this http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/de ... 5?v=glance which I got from Brimarc but I do not like it as the foot levers are not that easy to operate and it tips up one corner of the machine at a time as you raise it and it feels as though it could distort a machine base.

For another (my router table) I use "Tony's Machine Mart castors". I got big strong ones with brakes (although the brake on the swivel action - as opposed to the braking action on the wheel - is not very powerful) and welded up a frame to carry my machine so that it "sits within" the casters so they don't raise the height of the machine by more than half an inch.

I much prefer the first footlift operated base and wish I could have them all like that - it was very cheap when I bought it too!
 
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