Workshop layout - opinions / expertise

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GCM

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Hi All,
Over the last couple of years, I have been gradually putting together my workshop.
It's been a bit hit and miss, and its a work in progress, and changes around every so often
The reason for this is that my primary time and effort is on our house renovation, so most workshop elements have been done in a hurry so I can make something for the house.

The workshop has to be multi-use - woodwork, metalwork, an area for making stained glass, and anything else that the house throws at us!

I have plenty of working bench space - a main woodwork bench in the middle, plus benches along one wall (these are mainly used for the glass and metal work).

The issue I have is that the main power tools (table saw, thicknesser, mitre saw, and soon-to-be router table) are clumped together in the middle of the workshop. I tend to have to slightly move them around to get clearance for wood lengths, and for my working space.

I'm sure there is a better arrangement, but I'm struggling to find one that allows me room to move, and sufficient space for decent lengths of wood.

I should also mention that, although I would like a perfect workshop, at the moment it is a means to an end. Once (if!) the house is finished, then I will send time perfecting it! For now, I'm aiming for quick and easy fixes...

Any ideas, inspiration, advice? What can I do to make it work better?

I've attached a floor plan of the current layout

Workshop.jpg
 

Jameshow

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Looks nice

Two things that you probably already know.

1) if doing batch work them work flow us important from rough stock to thicknessing to joints to assembly to finishing..

2) good idea to have your saws and thicknesses at the same height level so that they use the same out feed.

Experts will be along shortly!

Cheers James
 

MikeK

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This is a good start. I might be wrong, but the relationship of the equipment to the shop footprint does not look correct, so I would start with a scale drawing of the shop and the equipment you have or want. Your shop has about the same area as mine, and you have considerably more equipment shown in yours with much more circulation space.

I don't see any indication of dust collection. With your cluster of chip and dust producing machines, you should give dust collection some consideration. When I designed my basement shop, I started with the dust collection and worked from there. I still made some mistakes, but these were easy to correct later.

With the exception of my table miter saw, all of my powered equipment is mobile so I can move them in and out of the main shop to connect to power and dust collection. This includes the router table, bandsaw, and P/T. The table saw is too large for me to consider making it mobile. The miter saw is built into a large cabinet along the wall that has most of my shop storage.
 

GCM

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Looks nice

It might look nice in the drawing, but I omitted the piles of wood offcuts, cardboard boxes, random tools that are in the wrong place, and the occasional radiator/sink/door/box of tiles etc that are waiting to be used in the house :giggle:

The working height is a very valid point. At the moment, I have some mismatches which can cause a problem with in and out feeds...
 

pcb1962

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Nobody seems to have mentioned putting the larger machines on wheels. I have my table saw, my bandsaw and my P/T on wheels so that each can be moved to the centre of the workshop for use, and pushed into a corner when not required.
You can also save bench space by making a flip cart for 2 of your smaller machines eg your spindle sander and disc sander, like this one.
 

GCM

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This is a good start. I might be wrong, but the relationship of the equipment to the shop footprint does not look correct, so I would start with a scale drawing of the shop and the equipment you have or want. Your shop has about the same area as mine, and you have considerably more equipment shown in yours with much more circulation space.

I think the scale should be just about correct. The benches against the walls are not very deep - around 600mm, and the main workbench is 1800x800.
Most of the equipment is relatively small - the TS is a small Scheppach, the thicknesser is a (slightly rubbish) Titan from screwfix etc. The circulation space is not too bad, if it was kept clear!

I don't see any indication of dust collection. With your cluster of chip and dust producing machines, you should give dust collection some consideration. When I designed my basement shop, I started with the dust collection and worked from there. I still made some mistakes, but these were easy to correct later.

Dust collection is a very good point. At present, I have a 50Litre extractor with a 100mm pipe, which I move between the thicknesser and tablesaw.
For everything else, I have a couple of Numatic Henry, that I move around.
To be honest though, it is a pin to keep moving them, and I sometimes get lazy and don't bother :eek: Dust mask is always worn though!

With the exception of my table miter saw, all of my powered equipment is mobile so I can move them in and out of the main shop to connect to power and dust collection. This includes the router table, bandsaw, and P/T. The table saw is too large for me to consider making it mobile. The miter saw is built into a large cabinet along the wall that has most of my shop storage.

I liked the idea of building the mitre saw into the bench along the end wall. But, the bench is not continuous, there is a pillar in the way... I don't think I would have enough capacity for longer length cuts.

I'm thinking along the same lines - keep the TS fixed, possible the mitre saw. And have thicknesser / router portable
 

Cabinetman

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I think you’re doing very well considering there are eight of you in that workshop ha ha, it’s one of life‘s rules that it really doesn’t matter how large your workshop is you always have to move something! I moved into my new one (5 x 15.m.) about 10 years ago double the size of my old one, loads of anticipation of having room to spare, and I still have to move things, Ian
 

Ollie78

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Make sure everything is on wheels if it can be.

Try to make everything the same height as much as possible.

Try to work out the likely flow of production.
I have the table saw next to the planer/ thicknesser so processing of long lengths can be done at that end, with enough clearance both sides.

Whatever the space you will end up using it all and wanting an extension.

Ollie
 

johnny

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That looks like a really well planned ergonomic layout ...very nice.
its a great size too, my workshop is 4x3m and I'm always cursing that I didn't make it 3.5m wide or 5m long . It always seems just a bit too small but then the more space you have the more you seem to accumulate
 

Droogs

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Thinking of workflow etc I have made a quick drawing of a layout for you. Bear in mind that all the horizontal tble and working surfaces are intended to be at the same height and that all the machines and the to benches will have wheels. The long mitre station bench is intended to be static along the whole wall and the various machines on it are meant to be inset so that their tables etc are level with the bench. T his way you have full support for heavy items no matter where in the workshop they are being worked on. Also all your drawers a made to fit underneath.

Taking that you will start at the wood store and size your stock and then saw and then rout (if needed), Then switch sides for all the other stuff.

Layout below is what I would suggest (not to scale but close enough)

Wksp design adjusted  GCM.png
 

GCM

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Sorry, very late reply from me!
My wife wishes there was 8 of me in the workshop - she always says she needs to clone me!

Thanks to everyone for your input and help.

Definitely good points about:
Keeping main machinery at same heights and movable
Concentrating on workflow (although I'm not sure I am organised enough for this)
Always needing a bigger workshop (for sure!)


I like the look of the modified layout from Droogs (thanks for this). I'll see how that can be adapted for my use. The only issue I see is for the mitre saw. There is a pillar halfway across the long wall, which splits it into two workbenches, neither are really long enough for the mitre saw.

Re-organising is my Christmas break project, so I might post some pictures if it goes well :)
 

gmgmgm

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My workshop is about the same size as yours (2 joined stables), and I struggle to fit all the kit in!

Despite there being a pillar in the way, wouldn't it be best to put the mitre saw along that wall? That will save you space everyday, and you can always move it out for longer jobs. I would put the mitre saw roughly near where your scroll saw is, then put the scroll saw behind the door (assuming that's the tool you use least). Otherwise that corner will inevitably fill up with junk!

I assume it's a combined planer/thicknesser, and it's on wheels? I have separates, but if I'm planing 6ft/2m boards I have to orient in certain ways to have enough space. Sometimes closer to the door, so it can poke in/out.
 

GCM

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My workshop is an extension to my garage. Well, actually 2 extensions, the first section is brick, and then it has a half brick/half wood, slightly leaky, extension tacked on.
The previous owner of the house parked 3 cars end to end, but I didn't want to have to shuffle cars, so I just kept the original part for a car, and the extensions for a workshop!

I think you are right about the mitre saw location. Most of the time, it will probably be OK with a short overhang to the right of it. I guess I can build it into the workbench, possible on a pull out module.
The scroll saw gets used very infrequently, so can probably even be stored on a shelf under the bench

Yes, it is a combined planer/thicknesser. Not currently on wheels (its bolted onto an old workmate!), but I'm going to make a simple cabinet for it to sit on, with wheels.
 

Sheptonphil

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is that not "the mould was already broken" when they made you? :p
She says as soon as they saw what came out they went and broke it, but your probably right, can’t make a perfect casting from an imperfect mould. The rest of the world seems to have coped with me for 60+ years, it’s only her struggling to cope.
 
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