• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Workshop layout help/advice?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
114
Reaction score
10
Location
chaddesden derby
I have built my own workshop in my garden and have just booked in the electrics to be wired in on the 24th november.

Im just writing this post to just get peoples advice on what they think the best layout would be before i commint100%to the plug points.

The inside dimensions are 3.1 x 5.2 meters. My list of equipment is as follows

Record power BS400 floor standing band saw
UJK Router table from axminster
AXMINSTER TRADE AT260SPT SPIRAL PLANER THICKNESSER
AXMINSTER TRADE AT540PD FLOOR PILLAR DRILL
Laguna fusion 3 table saw (will be purchasing soon when complete)
Laguna cyclone dust extractor (will be purchaisng soon when complete)
Excalibur 21" scroll saw (not to worried about this as will squeeze in where i can at the end)
Tool chest (about 6ft tall nearly)
Evolution sliding compound mitre saw

I should add that all floor standing machines will be on mobile bases eventually, including the outfeed bench.

I will be having a bench at one end and bench to act as an outfeed table for the table saw and extra workspace.

I will include pictures of the inside of the build currently and also a layout I created so you can all see what I have come up with. Then feel free to give advice on what you think?

Im having four downlights outside under the canopy overhang. 8 downlights on the inside. 3 16 amp sockets and 5 double standard sockets. These sockets are pin pointed on the layout.

Thanks for reading and I look froward to your thoughts and opinions

20211016_120334.jpg 20211016_120348.jpg 20211016_120410.jpg Workshop layout screenshot.jpg
 

Attachments

  • 20211016_120417.jpg
    20211016_120417.jpg
    108.5 KB · Views: 142

PerryGunn

Established Member
Joined
21 Oct 2020
Messages
261
Reaction score
252
Location
South Coast
All I can say is put in at least twice as many sockets as you think you'll need - then add a few extra for good measure. You'll never need to use them all at once but anything that avoids trailing cords, or the need to use an extension lead, in a workshop removes trip hazards.

You may also find that, although you've planned where everything is going to be, this may change over time and additional sockets installed now are relatively cheap & easy - adding additional sockets later will cost more and be a bit of a PITA.

I've only got a small workshop and made sure that I put in plenty of sockets. Worth having at least one double under any fixed-place benches and some higher ones over benches or along walls are very useful as you can still reach them when things would be in the way of 'normal-height' ones.
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
Joined
14 Mar 2013
Messages
5,374
Reaction score
2,337
Location
Edinburgh
Think about how you process and work your materials. Dimensioning (width & thickness) first and what you use to do that and then work either clockwise or anti-clockwise around the workshop until you are at where you will apply the finish to the piece. Think about what powered kit will be used at each station and where they will be and put in the appropriate feeds. Also think about having a couple of feeds dropping from the ceiling using either coiled cable such as a phone handset cable used to be or an automatic sprung retractable cable feed for big machines you may move around
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
1,546
Reaction score
1,273
Location
Scotland
Just as others have said +1 for many more double sockets and then some extra. It is so easy to put them in at this stage. Can you get sockets to the middle of the area, possibly from the ceiling. Also use several of the LED light panels that people have talked about. Lots of diffuse light to eliminate shadows. I would have some kind of emergency stop along the centre and pairs of master slave sockets in the walls. A master shut off switch at the exit so at night you can turn everything off , but possibly one or two sockets on a bypass for things you might want to leave on. Speakers wired in, perhaps a disco ball in the middle??
 

Sideways

Established Member
Joined
26 Dec 2017
Messages
1,848
Reaction score
652
Location
United Kingdom
Yup, double socket every 1 metre along the walls. You don't need them in the corners so that makes about 10 of them between the two long and one short walls.

One 16A outlet near the door in case you need to run a cable outdoors for a bit of welding.

Two 16A outlets on whatever is your "back" wall to feed your table saw and whatever. Say at the 1/3 and 2/3 positions I'm saying "back" wall because you don't want to be stepping over the cables to your machines.
Anything with 1.5kW motor or less, and corded power tools will run off a 13A socket.

Workshops are like rooms in the house. You are bound to reorganise many times over the years so a flexible distribution of power has advantages.

Are you having the electrics wired properly - individual LNE wires ("singles") run in metal or plastic conduit and metal box switches and sockets ?
Keep it where you can see it and easily add to it, protect it from knocks and the fixings of all the shelves, hangers and whatever that you will gradually put into your walls....
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
3,104
Reaction score
1,177
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
If you can add a lean to without violating zoning etc I would put the dust collector outside.

I suggest you have at least one or two circuits big enough to handle a 5hp/4Kw motor. You never know when one will come into your life.

Here is a little information of light levels for various activities. Illuminance - Recommended Light Level My shop has 1,000 lumens per square metre.

Pete
 

Rob Cheetham

Established Member
Joined
11 Sep 2018
Messages
114
Reaction score
10
Location
chaddesden derby
Thankyou to all that have replied. I think I will take the advice on more sockets. Like 1 every meter that was stated. Im not sure on hanging sockets but im defo going to look into it. I just think it might be a bit overkill as its only a small workshop, but I do like the sound of a retractable one. Anyone not if you can get a retractable one on a runner from one end of the room to another. That would be helpfull
 

Ollie78

Established Member
Joined
4 Aug 2011
Messages
1,356
Reaction score
618
Location
Wiltshire
Try and make everything the same height.
Put everything on wheels if it can be.
Try to line up the table saw and planer with a door for long lengths.
Get plenty of good lights, I like 6400k led batons and they are cheap.

Ollie
 

Trextr7monkey

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2020
Messages
84
Reaction score
29
Location
Cumbria
Hi regarding the sockets I would look at running industrial style trunk that allows sockets to be placed anywhere rather than lots of doubles. We had it at work and it was reconfigured several times over the years.
Overhead cable reels we used tended to. be fixed in one spot very useful-again by trade grade stuff rather than from local hardware shop. Well worth getting it right early on👍
 

Spectric

Established Member
Joined
19 Feb 2015
Messages
3,636
Reaction score
1,882
Location
North Cumbria
The one thing you soon realise is that whatever layout you have planed, as soon as you actually start to work in there you find that things need moving round. This is the big advantage of a large workshop because you are not always juggling space and have the room to place machines where you want without them interferring with using others. Unfortunately many of us are in smaller spacers and getting things to a working state will involve putting things on castors and having flexability, often having to move a machine to use it. Also keep in mind heights, ie your outfeed tables need to be above any obstructions so workpieces can be freely fed.
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
3,104
Reaction score
1,177
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
You could use a wire rope strung tight from one end of the shop to the other just under the ceiling. Suitable electrical wire hanging in loops from it on small pulleys so that the wire can be pulled where you want it. Same idea as gantry cranes use. It can also be done with pipe, tube or track etc. Jib cranes

Pete
 

Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
Messages
2,704
Reaction score
1,520
Location
lincolnshire Wolds
Exciting times!
Fit some noggins around the walls to take the sockets, and don’t use the studs to bring the conduits down on, you will hamper fixing shelf brackets etc, damhik!
Might be worth putting a hatch in the wall opposite the door so you can rip long lengths of wood. Ian
 

heimlaga

Established Member
Joined
27 Sep 2009
Messages
1,450
Reaction score
211
Location
Österbotten, Finland
I agree. On a workshop that size you will need strathegically placed hatches in the walls for ripping and planing.

Use the upper parts of the walls for shelves and cabinets for less often used tools and materials.
 

heimlaga

Established Member
Joined
27 Sep 2009
Messages
1,450
Reaction score
211
Location
Österbotten, Finland
I would try to put the bandsaw where you planned for the drill press. To get outfeed space for the planer/thicknesser. The drill press culd stand where you planned for the bandsaw as both table and head can be swiveled out of the exact line of the planer-thicknesser.
If the bandsaw stands where you planned for the drill press you only need to wheel it half a metre away from the wall to get two metres of free outfeed path behind it and unlimited infeed path through the door.
I would want the dust collector immediately inside the door where you planned for the tool chest. Carrying a barrel of chips through a cramped workshop isn't too fun. Then the tool chest could stand besides the workbench.

Just an idea
 

southendwoodworker

Established Member
Joined
6 Nov 2020
Messages
139
Reaction score
116
Location
southend
Very envious!

With the table saw - i am assuming the outfeed is on to the bench rather than in to the wall. if that is the case, do you have enough in feed space given it is so close to the door?
 

recipio

Established Member
Joined
16 Jun 2008
Messages
509
Reaction score
169
Location
ireland
If the mitre saw is the main crosscutting saw you will use it 90% of the time. Try and stand it away from a wall so you can get behind it to tidy up. Even with extraction they generate an awful lot of sawdust.
 
Top