Workshop in garden shed and noise

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Sacricket

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Hi everyone, new member here, so don't know if this type of question has been raised or not, I am starting to work from home after leaving my job, and want to use my garden shed (workshop) to make wedding ring and jewelry, using a lathe and drills and other machinery. I am worried about the noise and neighbors complaining. Is there any law about this, or can I just carry on, I won't be out there all day, prob only working with machines about 2/3 hours starting around 11am. Thanks on advance for any help or advice.
Grant
 

baldkev

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Doesnt sound like particularly noisy stuff.... not like a disc cutter or router levels of noise so it'll probably be absolutely fine. You could always knock on your immediate neighbours doors and let them know, but it doesn't sound like you will need to.
 

Bingy man

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I do a lot of work in the garden - table saw /planer / Sanding etc but no complaints-however home grown veg given to my closest neighbors and I’m always happy to help them out with A few minor repairs . I avoid early mornings and late evenings. Personally I would let your closest neighbors know what your planning -at least then you can gauge there reactions and as per baldkev you probably won’t make a lot of noise .
 

Orraloon

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Its luck of the draw and kind of depends on the actual neighbors and your relationship with them. Some can be good and some will complain about anything. It often comes up on WW forums of people having to curtail woodworking after complaints to council. I keep my noisey machine use to daytime hours and also if next door has a mower going then the tablesaw is less likely to be noticed. When I started woodturning I gave wooden bowls to the two houses either side of me at christmas and said I hoped any noise I made was not a bother. The both encouraged me to keep going and one later offered me some wood when he had a tree taken down. It would not be a bad idea to find just what the local noise rules are and use a phone app to check noise level at the fence lines near your shed. Will at least give you an idea if it's a real problem or not.
Regards
John
 

clogs

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check out sound proofing/insulation.....thats if u can get to the walls n roof.....

we had similar probs with nosey neighbours....they even complained about our kids rabbit wondering around our fully enclosed garden....they even call the RSPCA.....!!!!!!!
so we moved to a place where the nearest neighbour is 1/2 mile away.....I know we cant all do that.....

there's a local law here about cutting grass on a Sunday.....it's been brought to my attension....
I said when u can stop the blxxdy church bells going off at all hours on a Sunday I'll quit as well.....hahaha....
 

Doug71

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I think it's a bit of a grey area running a business out of your garden shed. It's all fine if it's running smoothly but if any issues come up there could be problems with planning permissions, insurance etc.
 

Lazurus

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Its environmental health who pursue any noise complaints usually they install a noise meter initially to evidence the noise level.
 

OldGreyDog

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As others suggest, speak to neighbours if you are on good terms, limit early morning, evening use of the noisy machinery. Beyond that its pot luck. My recollection of planning rules may be out of date (don’t shoot me i’m just a retired local authority planning officer), but officially business use of residential premises used to be limited to using one room of a house as an office by a resident occupier. A doctor or other health professional, or an architect was also ok. Technically using garden buildings as workshops for business uses was a material change of use needing planning consent, although many small scale home businesses operated from sheds and garages go undetected and in some instances were simply tolerated. After ten years continuous unchallenged use you would be immune (ten year rule) from any action by the Council.
 

imageel

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Having previously lived next to an abusive neighbour I'd say being friendly and considerate is the best approach. When I moved into my current house I had the room to build a decent sized workshop as I have a 50m rear garden, but I made sure it was neighbour friendly - I used a low pitch roof and sheathed it all in cedar shingles so it looks quite nice and even got compliments from one neighbours wife as it was being built asking if I'd consider building them one! - she lost interest after I told her I'd stopped counting the cost when it went north of £10k. I also insulated the walls with 100mm Celotex and a battened - for power etc void then sheathed internally with 6mm ply, so not only thermally insulated but pretty soundproof too.
I keep on speaking terms with both neighbours and always mention if I'm about to embark on any seriously intense projects and most times they respond with a 'we don't really notice, just a background hum from the extractor etc'
I also am cognisant of their activities - if in summer they are in their gardens then I'll limit what I get up to, and also don't push it either really early or late, especially in the summer months.
From what you describe I wouldn't have thought your neighbours would have much to complain about, in my case I generate far less noise than most garden implements - mowers, strimmer's, hedge cutters etc etc!
 

Essex Barn Workshop

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My son is a professional drummer, and has a kit set up in his room at front of our house. The rules I told our neighbours we would stick to for practice are not an a Sunday, not before 10am or after 7pm and no longer than 1 hour at a time.
Letting them know something similar for your tools might stop them worrying or complaining?
 

Terry - Somerset

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Running routers or thicknessers is noisy. Bandsaw, pillar drill, wood lathe are relatively quiet. It may be worth testing the noise level in the garden when the kit is being used - door closed and a few metres away and it may be fairly unobtrusive.

Having said that it may be worth discussing with neighbours, committing to limited time slots etc.

Other points to consider - (a) security of a shed for manufacturing jewellery with possibly valuable materials, (b) working in winter where better insulation would be pleasant (and also reduce sound transmission), (c) local authority planning issues, (d) insurance - extra for the workshop, would it invalidate the policy in the event of a claim.
 

NosamLuap

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I work out of my detached garage, which is about 6 metres from our living room (and similar distance from our two neighbours, as we live in a corner house). I had my wife sit in the living room with the window open slightly, whilst I went in the garage with all doors shut - she can't hear the lathe/pillar drill or bandsaw; she can hear the table saw and the vac but 'only just', the thickness planer was, I quote, "Bloody ridiculous - hope you don't need to use that much" :ROFLMAO:

So, for the machines you intend to use, I don't think there should be a real concern but I'd definitely try to gauge the volume from your neighbours perspective and have a chat with them.
 

Jameshow

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I'd suggest getting induction motor powered tools only.

So a decent table saw, p/t pillar drill and even a sliding mitre saw like an old kgs300.
 

Spectric

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The only issue you may run into is running a business from a domestic property unless you can state it is a hobby, much easier if you have a source of income from a day job. In your favour I doubt making jewellery is really a noisy pastime, planers and saws make a lot more noise and so does restoring old cars.
 
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