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The Wizard

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Hi all,

Wasn't sure what heading to put this under but I'll try here. I have been using my garage as a workshop now for approx six months, new to woodworking you see. The bug has really got me but I am repeatedly suffering from the problems created by an uneven workshop floor. I have decided to remedy the situation with some self levelling floor compound but am unsure of the best/cost effective product and the best means of application. There is stuff available from Wickes etc but, having surfed the web, I am wondering if some industrial epoxy solution would be better.
Have any of you been through this process ? any advice would be welcome.

PS Bought a BAS250 a couple of weeks ago from Rutlands and first impressions are that its a fantastic tool.

Cheers

Chris
 

morrisminordriver

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Hi,

Ive just done this and used Sealocrete self levelling compound. Its important to follow the instructions ref the mix, you need to have a slurry which will find its own level to a degree but I find helping it flow with a plasterers float helps to make it runs and gets the bubbles out of the mix. You must only mix up enough to use in a few minutes, I found a square metre at a time worked OK.

The outcome is a very hard and smooth floor which is great for helping keep the dust down when sweeping.

One thing about this stuff is that its pricy. I need to do a bigger surface area soon and I will try a strong mix (poss 1:3) of cement and sharp sand (dont use building sand as its not pre washed and can be be very "sticky" - lots of clay in it in this part of the world).

Good luck!.

Mike S - New Forest - Hants.
 

Scrit

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Chris

What sort of floor are you trying to lay onto? Also what sort of loadingf are you going to put on the floor?
 

The Wizard

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Scrit

I am laying the leveling compound on an existing concrete garage floor which is uneven due to poor workmanship(not mine I'm pleased to say). The loading will be relatively light with the heaviest item being my workbench.

Mike

Where did you get the sealocrete from?

Regards


Chris
 

woodshavings

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My workshop is 10 x15 and had a rough concrete floor.

I used Wickes self leveling compound and then covered with B&Q "lino" flooring. The levelling compound needs a covering - it is too soft to use as a final finish

Its satisfactory but you must be thorough with the mixing.

In restrospect I think I would have been better with a wooden floor on battens laid on the concrete base - this would not need a covering and warmer.

Hope this helps,

John
 

Scrit

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Hi Chris

As John states most levelling screeds are too soft to level and then take abrasion. I've had success in a previous workshop with the levelling screed sold by Glynwed. It has the advantage that it can be mixed with sharp sand to provide more body, but it isn't a true self-levelling screed. You have to spread it with a large float (preferably a flooring float - they're huge) and get it approximately flat, the small ridges will then disappear over a couple of hours whilst it is setting. It did need the original concrete to be waterproofed, though, as there was no DPC under the floor - the first attempt at levelling lasted only 4 weeks in winter due to water penetration from below. The second attempt I sealed the floor with a PU waterproofer (made by Bondaplas Voss (?) in Kent) before levelling and the levelled section then stayed for the next 3 years until I moved. I did, however, put a sheething of 19mm flooring grade chip on top afterwards, mainly to keep my feet warm (it was my assembly area) - concrete is a bit hard and cold onthe feet after a couple of hours. It didn't need a DPC as the floor immediately below the screed had been treated.

Scrit
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Wiz,
My advice would be to lay a waterproof membrane, put some joists down, bung some insulation in and floor your workshop with timber or chipboard. It'll be a lot easier on your feet, a lot warmer and if you drop a chisel, you won't have to re-grind it. It's also a lot kinder to your work, and means that you can use the floor for large projects without worrying so much about marking the job or crunching a corner. Concrete and wood/woodtools don't make for a happy partnership, and the self levelling screed is notoriously hard and brittle. It'll crack up on you over time. Wickes are doing some T&G'd chipboard flooring at really good prices, and they have tons of Finnish timber studding that you could use for the joists. They're knocking it out really cheap. Hope that helps!
 

The Wizard

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Hi guys
Thanks for the info. Sorry I have not responded sooner, received no email notification (maybe one for you Charley). I like the sound of the chipboard, sounds very tool friendly and warm. What do you think to the idea of laying the chipboard over some polystyrene/foam to take the discrepancies out?


Regards

Chris
 

Drew

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Hiya Wizard
I agree with "guest" about your floor. Putting battens down on the floor makes for easier leveling and a bonus is you can run wiring underneath to the appropriate places for your machines. Remembering that if you go that way make sure you screw the floor down so that if anything happens you can get underneath easily.

Drew
 

Steve

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Hi Chris,
I don't think the foam idea is a bad one, but personally, I'd keep it thin. You don't want to be bouncing round the workshop! The only trouble with the total wood floor approach is that the floor can act as a huge soundboard, which is another reason the insulation is so important. I guess a polyfoam 'membrane' would help in that direction. A major point is to make sure that moisture can't get to the chipboard. You can imagine ther results. I was the 'guest' above - I forgot to log in!
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Wizard,

I got your email last night. Are you having problems with your email, I sent the plans to you on the 5th, but as you don't seem to have received them, I sent them again last night. Hopefully you will have got them this time, but if not let me know. I sent them to the email address that came with the email that you sent me, so this must be the correct one.
If you still have not received them, then email me your address and I will print a copy and send it by snail post! to make sure you get them this time.
 
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