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Workshop Flooring - Laminate????

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SVB

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Folks,

Some advice needed here. I (builders really!) am in the process of finishing off the new workshop. 10' x 15' - big enough to do anything I want but not in the league of some here I know.

Anyway, to the question in point. I will be left with a concrete floor and a low bank a/c once the completion of the build is done. I would like to put some sort of floor down to improve comfort rather than stick with the concrete but don't want to spend a fortune.

I have thought of two options. The first is a chipboard t/g floor on 2'x2' joists with a lino / cusionfloor cover. The second is to lay a dpc / underlay sheet and a laminate floor.

The second option is my preferred solution as modern laminates, whilst not as good as the real thing are close. However, I am not sure on the performance of laminate in an exterior building (no central heating I am afraid, just an oil filled radiator when I am there - w/ends only probably).

Will the laminate work or buckle - I can't afford the solid £35/m^2 stuff, more likely will be the £9/m^2 B&Q budger stuff. It is not bathroom rated (similar dampness to outside w/shop or irrelevent?) but is hall / lounge stuff. Probably ok in terms of traffic given DIY nature of workshop and if the top coat wears off in time I am not too bothered, it is just if the whole thing swells and buckles in a non-heated outdoor building I could do with a warning!

Given the above, (and sorry for the ramble) anyone got any advice / other ideas for a budget solution I have not thought of????

Thanks in advance,

Simon
 

engineer one

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not sure about the moisture take up from the concrete in an unheated and stable temp shop, so not sure the really cheap B&Q stuff may not be the way to go. i wonder whether moisture proof mdf with a painted coating, and then at the work areas some of those axminster workshop squares which seem quite good on your legs etc.

don't forget that you are bound to drop liquids on it so that won't help either.

actually maybe the way to go are those boards they sell for flooring the attic, they are pretty cheap and would then give you a more stable surface to work from.

hope this helps
paul :wink:
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Simon

The floor in my workshop is excellent. You can spend all day in there without the slightest sign of fatigue.

I used 3 x 2 CLS (from B&Q) and on top of this put the cheap Wickes green damp-proof liner. On top of that I put 18mm ply and then I have the carpet tiles that I bought cheaply from B&Q.

Cheers
Neil
 

Steve Maskery

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My workshop has a concrete floor, and I now very much regret not putting down a proper floor. I don't like the idea of laminate, it just seems too slippery to me. OK if you work clinically, perhaps, but my cleanlines is a long way from godliness. I've painted my floor in some areas, and that can get quite slippery when it gets dusty, so I think laminate would be worse.

If I were doing it now I would lay a membrane on the conctete, lay 2x4s on that, filled will polystyrene, and then chipboard floorboards, sheets or sterlingboard (whatever I could get cheaply, I guess) as the floor itself.

Remember you only want to do the job once.

HTH
Steve
 

OLD

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My method is similar to steve i use special dense polystyrene for floors 2400x1200x25 £6.75 on top of polythene membrane then chip board flooring glued up straight on top its solid, just leave a small gap for expansion. Its one of those things you don't think it will be strong enough but it is.
 

SVB

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Thanks to all who have posted. I had not really thought about the slip factor - good point. Although I think the carpet tiles will keep the shop warn, as I am turning 75% of the time they may make clearing up awkward. I think the chipboard boards may be the option.

Regarding insulation, is the high density foam that much better than the traditional glass fibre stuff to be worth the extra cost? Or is it ease of use that swings the balance?

Simon
 

samlarsen

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I'd go with OLD's suggestion. You'll only need 5 sheets and will probably work out cheaper than the rockwool and batten approach anyhow.

Just consider floor loading a little also. 19mm chipboard will need support at least at 400 centres if on battens for a reasonalby high machinery load, and the void below (even if filled with rockwool) is essentially a sound box so if you have block walls the noise effect could be interesting.

The polystyrene slab method gives you better support and no sound box.

Do you have any very heavy machines to support?

Sam
 

ike

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I can vouch for sawdust on laminate. Unless you keep the floor clean - it's VERY slippery indeed. It wouldn't be my first choice in the workshop - but then you haven't seen the state of my workshop! My excuse is the accumulated dust, chippings and wood grot helps keep the humidity stable, Ha! :oops:

You can screw moisture-resistant grade chipboard (or even 25mm Caberdeck) directly to the slab on top of 3mm closed cell insulation. Although underfloor cavity could possibly be an advantage for wiring runs etc

Ike
 

Ian Dalziel

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SVB":8milnxm0 said:
Folks,
I have thought of two options. The first is a chipboard t/g floor on 2'x2' joists with a lino / cusionfloor cover. The second is to lay a dpc / underlay sheet and a laminate floor.
I did this , i also insulated with styrene sheets between the battons then layed underlay and laminate. Best thing i did in the workshop...if i ever move and have to do another it will be exactly the same.
I've had it down now for 5 years and never slipped but i wear steel toecaps antislip boots in the workshop. I also have excellant dustextraction but still get fine dust appearing every now and then.
It also aids machine moving as its so smooth. I have a colchester student lathe sitting on it...milling machine and most other woodworking machinery and it hasnt marked it....a testemant to modern manufacturing it also makes cleaning up a treat rather than a chore
. i would definately do it again....slippy...yes it can be with slippers on dont knock it until you try it.

Ian
 

SVB

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OK - So I am persuaded laminate is not the way to go.

I have access to some 19mm marine ply which I plan to lay on 1" high density foam board underlay.

However, the ply is 8x2 T&G long side only, and I am looking to cover a 10x15 area. So, assuming I have 8 x (8x2) sheets joints and a 15x2 strip left, how to I join the thin strip to the rest? I have thought of getting a T&G router cutter but it is v.expensive for only one 15' cut, cutting some biscuit slots in the ply and using biscuits - anyone any suggestions?

Thanks
Simon.
 

jasonB

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If you don't have a biscuit jointer then a biscuit cutter in a router will do, either about 4 biscutes per 2ft end or one long slot and a strip of 4mm ply.

Don't lay them as you say but stagger the joints so first board 8ft long, then cut 2ft off next board and use this to take you to the wall. Start the next row with the remaining 6ft length, then cut a 4ft etc, etc.

Jason
 

ike

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OK - So I am persuaded laminate is not the way to go.
Oh, don't listen to them, what do they know?. It's perfectlEEEE...whoaaauUPahh...OH my back!, HeEELP!!!! :lol:
 

frank

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svb can you not rout a half lap joint in each board you only need a straight router bit, then you can screw or nail the joint 8)

frank
 

j

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Could that 15x2 area be under some cupboards/workbench along that wall?
Then it wouldn't really matter how or if it was joined to the rest.
 

SquareCircle

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SVB

Coming in at the tailend….

I had a laminate floor in my last workshop (tour of it in online somewhere). Really Cheap stuff from B&Q, reckon it came is at around £5 / sqm laid inc underlay. Floor construction was 4x2’s with 75mm polystyrene slabs btwn overlain by chipboard T&G. After dirtying the CB for about 2 years I laid the laminate floor (it was the cheapest thing I could find at the time) Pro’s: Extremely quick and easy to clean up, you can just about see the dust & chips flying into the extractor from 6 inches (effortless clean promotes a tidy habit). Machines are very easy to move around, stands up remarkably well to muddy boots etc. Cons – You get to slide around a bit using hand tools, especially planes. Also need to be careful when stacking stuff vertically. Solved both by OSD scraps + 150 grit sandpaper at strategic locations.
I am in the midst of dreaming up a new workshop. I reckon that concrete floor overlain with 50mm polystyrene then edge glued Tand G chipboard flooring is not a bad solution. conventional floorboards would drive me crazy from the cleaning point. Think that you need a Plastic membrane beneath the Jabalite and a vapour control layer between beneath the chipboard, but the experts will soon be along to advise. Don’t believe that the level of heating is relevant, it’s all about good vapour control. Then give the chipboard a good coating of the best floor paint you can afford before walking on it. And if that doesn't last I'd cover it with another cheap laminate floor. Another thing that I found worked well - install a 16A (or 32A) floor circuit with floor boxes for centrally placed machinery. Gets rid of cable trip hazards.
Personally I think that a timber floor on joists / battens is a poor second for a workshop that has machinery spinning a high rpm’s. Just about doubled up on the joists at the last place to get a really stiff floor, but still never felt right. And then there’s the loudspeaker effect…..
 
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