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OLD

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Its concrete tamped finish not bad but not smooth it has a visqueen dpc under it .I would like it to be smooth as its small and machines have to be moved on there castors looking for economical way to do this any ideas.
 

Noel

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Hi Old,

Welcome. Self Levelling compound, ply on battens?

Rgds

Noel
 

Midnight

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Welcome aboard Old....

2 thoughts...

firstly... the only reliable way to get a dead smooth top finish on concrete is to float it by hand; takes time, patience, a kanny eye and your knees will HATE you.... but it'll be smooth...

secondly... every workshop thread I've come across that mentions a cement floor says the floor kills their feet. Additionally, services embedded in the floor tend to restrict future re-arrangements. Personally, I'd opt for Noely's idea; lay ply over wooden stringers... something with a bit of spring in it will always be kinder to your legs.
 

Shadowfax

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Hi Old and welcome.
Forget the ply - more expense than necessary. Use flooring grade t&g chipboard, the moisture resistant type with the green finish. It's made for the job and if you glue the joins it will make a perfect workshop floor.
If you don't want to use battons just lay the chipboard sheets over a damp proof membrane of some kind directly on the concrete, especially if it is reasonably smooth anyway.
That is what I did and the result is easy to walk on and is still fairly warm. Much more comfortable than the original concrete.
Cheers.

SF
 
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Anonymous

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Shadowfax FWIW If you lay a dpm straight onto tamped concrete then apply T&G good chance you will puncture it maybe try a light sprinkle of fine sand first
 

Shadowfax

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AP Yes, you are right there. Actually, I used several layers of polythene membrane plus a few other bits and pieces of water proof stuff that I had just so that the odd puncture would not cause any problems.
So far so good, as they say!

SF
 
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No probs SF was not a dig just a thought , had to change a few things during my build . Will finish this week i hope , have i said that before :oops:
 

Shadowfax

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AP It did not occur to me that you might be having a dig. No worries there.
Every time I lay a membrane I always think it will get/already has a hole in it somewhere!
I have not seen even a sign of moisture on the wrong side of one yet, though.
Perhaps we are talking paranoia here! The wizard's horse worried? Nah!!
Perhaps I am just lucky! Or..........
Perhaps I should go out to the work shop and test the floor.......right now!

Seriously, if you do the job sensibly it should be good for a very long time but if there is a problem with damp the price of the chipboard t&g is so low that you could re-do a workshop the size of a single garage for about £50.00.

What I do know is that working on a concrete floor is very hard on the legs. Wood, even chipboard, is much nicer.

SF
 
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Old

When I worked at Marconi Radar a few years back (15 or so), they needed to have the floor of a lab perfectly level and smooth. They used a very wet screed. First layer was laid with a trowel. Second layer they poured it onto the floor to a depth of 6-8mm or so, and it self leveled
 
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SF soz my last post was a bit tongue in cheek :lol: also another benefit of wood floor chisels will not need 30 mins work if you knock one off the bench
 

Alan Holtham

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Having done exactly this with a workshop floor, might I suggest that you first seal the underside of the chipboard first with a suitable waterproofer and then finish the top surface when it is down. Rustins do an excellent slip resistant floor varnish that is water based and dead easy to apply. Screwfix sell it if you don't have a local Rustins stockist. It also helps protect the surface when you start dragging machines about as well, but the traffic areas will need recoating occasionally,

Alan
 

Keith Smith

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Another option if you have a rough concrete floor is to lay Jablite (polystyrene) 25mm thick over the floor then a vapour barrier (1000 Gauge polythene) then the chipboard. This also has the benefit of warming the floor and helps to prevent condensation. If you have particularly heavy equipment then you could use two layers of t&g. I put one layer of t&g down and intended to lay another on top but have never got round to it. Wish I had thought to varnish it though as it is now covered in various patches of paint and oil.

Keith
 

Ian Dalziel

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Hi Old,

When i did my workshop i had a concrete floor which got sore on my feet whilst standing for long lengths of time.
I then changed to a wooden floor
I first layed a damp proof membrane; then i screwed 50mmx50mm battons down and inbetween the battons i used 50mm thick white polystyrene insulation; then screwed on 8x2 x 22mm thick chipboard flooring. the chipboard had a damp proof already injected, i also think Alans idea is also good as i've used a lot of rustins stuff and i've found it to be first class
Once i had my floor layed i went over it with laminate click flooring, its now very cheap, this at first i was informed by my wife to be overkill but after using it now for over 3 years its probobly been the best improvement i have ever done in the workshop; Its so easy to move equipement around, brushing is a pleasure not a chore ands its nice to walk on.
With the thermal qualities of the floor now i never have problems with cast iron rusting and its a lot easier to heat.
Its an absolute pleasure going out to the workshop because of the difference on the floor

best of luck whatever you decide
Ian
 

Alf

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Ian Dalziel":1xr8tu1t said:
Once i had my floor layed i went over it with laminate click flooring
And all this time I thought your workshop was in fact in your front room! :lol:

I'll third (I think? Lost count) the recommendation for Rustins floor stuff, and also vouch for the concrete floor induced aches and pains. I've got some of that anti-fatigue matting down now, which helps, but a wooden floor would make such a difference. :(

Oh yes, and welcome to the forum, OLD. :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Ian Dalziel

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Alf
And all this time I thought your workshop was in fact in your front room!
I did try to take the plasma out as well but Mrs Dalziel wanted another new kitchen no 4 in 4 years no way(dont go into it) so it had to stay

Ian
 

OLD

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Thanks for all your ideas as the door opens inwards from a metal cill allowing only 25mm extra on the concrete and there is a vapor barrier under the slab i will lay some roof felt (to hand ) then pva some chip board and lay and glue it together the board arrives on saturday .
The avatar is earth viewed from the moon can not remember where the image was down loaded from though.
 
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