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Alf

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davejester":1qt31l9b said:
Secondly, are there any good books/websites with plans for building wooden workshops?
Dave, I expect they'll be plenty of "DAMHIKT" advice along soon, but I think it might be well worth your while looking into getting back issues of GWW too. Issue #131 was the first in the workshop building series IIRC, but Andy (or a more organised subscriber than I) could probably be more specific as to which issues would be most helpful.

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Probably worth having a rummage through here via the search option too.
 

dedee

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Dave,

Have a look here http://www.gisburne.com/shed/

I have been following this chaps progress for weeks and he gives a fair idea of what can be achieved with a modicum of know-how and a few good books.

AndyP
 
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davejester":9w9u3r29 said:
Secondly, are there any good books/websites with plans for building wooden workshops?
Dave, please accept my contribution to the think tank !



Cheers
Alberto
 

cambournepete

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davejester":1iu2udra said:
...To keep things simple I plan on building the workshop from wood (hence it's a temporary structure so no planning permission required). The base will be concrete to cope with the weight of the new tools...
Might be worth checking with the planners as to the maximum size and positioning of any shed. They might also wonder whether the concrete base is a temporary structure !

I'm sure you've already thought to check with your new neighbours as well.
 

ike

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Dave,

hence it's a temporary structure so no planning permission required
Don't assume this is so. Local authority planning requirements vary from one to another. Best to mosey along to the District council planning office and check first - the're usually a friendly and helpful bunch. For instance, I thought I could build similar and a general guide booklet said 'up to 60cum', max height 4m - PP not normally required. Turned out that the end of my garden is (inside) the boundary of an AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - The Stroud Valleys) and PP required for absolutely ANYTHING! I discovered this when I recently checked with the council about extending the workshop. Fortunately what I already had has been there just over 4 years - the statute of limitation on retrospective planning permission - phew!

My tip for the roof. I jig- built 'W' trusses from 3" x 2" and joined them with flitch plates of 1/2" construction ply, glued with Cascamite and screwed. The screws were mainly for assembly as I reckon the glue joint is as strong as the timber sections. I was a bit worried about the ply delaminating under stress, but I've got loads of timber stored up in the roof and it's never sagged a millimetre ( well OK it must be at least a millimetre). You can get a superlight full span without needing too much timber.

I'll post some pics if you're interested for ideas.

Ike
 

johnjin

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Hi Dedee

Thanks for that link.
That is an impressive shed/workshop that he is building and an excellent record of his progress. I will be watching the last few days myself.

All the best

John
 

johnelliott

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I'm going to recommend that you consider getting some professional help with the base, going to cast a bit for sure but it might be worth it. At least get a load of readymix and some friends with wheel barrows round to help. Most areas there are firms that can supply a small lorryload of concrete.
The ideal help to get would be a couple of guys who know about this stuff and wouldn't mind working a Saturday for some readies
John
 
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for small amounts or awkward runs you can get concrete suppliers who turn up on a truck with the ingredients and a mixer mounted on the back, who will mix as much as you need there and then. It looks expensive at first glance, but if you then compare the cost of renting the mixers, making sure you order just the right amount of material and the hassles of delivery and equipment return, it works out pretty well (IMHO)

They will usually offer a barrowing and laying service as well, although they will charge extra for that - if you and a mate have strong backs and wheelbarrows it could save you some money.

As on the http://www.gisburne.com/shed/ site, I would seriously consider pad or strip footings and then put a joist and timber floor on those. Saves a fortune on concrete and is much less effort, and there are many benefits listed in other threads to having a timber floor - warmth, comfort and tool protection being key.

I did this for my workshop about 3 years ago - 12x16 timber garage/shed. I put in 3 concrete strips lengthwise, then bridged them with 6x2 tanalised joists and put the shed on that. I have a bestcombi sat right in the middle of the shop over one strip - not the heaviest machine going but not a lightweight either - and that doesn't seem to give me any great vibration problems. All the rest of the heavy kit is down either wall, again close to the joist/strip footing, and again doesn't give me any problems. If you are planning some particularly heavy kit you could look at putting in specific pads where that will be sited....

m
 

dedee

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As I see it one of the advantages of a solid concrete base (you can still run wooden joists and floor on top) is it non-suitability as a comfy home for rabbits, foxes or even badgers.

My sheds (built before we moved in) are on a concrete base. 2 house bricks then support the bearers with the wooden floor on top. The bricks are about 2 feet apart and provide sufficient room for me to clear out the leaf debris which collects every couple of years or so.

My neighbour on the other hand has a shed on bearers on soil and I am constantly filling in holes with bricks, stone, roofing tiles, logs etc to keep the foxes out.

Only 3 houses up the street badgers are regular visitors and probably responsible for breaking through my neighbours fence and getting at my spuds!
AndyP
 

cambournepete

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dedee":24haukhn said:
As I see it one of the advantages of a solid concrete base (you can still run wooden joists and floor on top) is it non-suitability as a comfy home for rabbits, foxes or even badgers.
Surely that should be "advantages"?.

I'd love that kind of wildlife in my garden.
 

mudman

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sawdustalley

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I wouldnt see it as that much of a problem.

Small high-voltage electric fence running around the gaps should solve it :wink:
 

CYC

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Dave, I would not advise to make the cement slab yourself in sections. It is so much work you will be at it for ever. I have poored the concrete slab on mine in one hour. The key is to get a few friends and wheelbarrows, you will get the cement from the truck to the hole that way. The truck ususally gives you 30min to an hour to unload.

So you just prepare carefully the hole for the slab with all the necessary insulation, retainers and reinforcement and when ready buy a big crate of beer to lur your friends into helping you for an hour or two. Not only will it be better but it will be cheaper if you count the cost of mixer rental (long period) plus all your WE trying to do it alone.
Check out my site for some pictures of the Workshop construction.

My 2 pences :wink:
 

ike

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Badgers are not quite so cuddly and cute (vicious and smelly more like) if you like growing carrots in your garden!

Ike
 

Adam

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CYC":2tvjk3bl said:
buy a big crate of beer to lur your friends into helping you for an hour or two. Not only will it be better but it will be cheaper if you count the cost of mixer rental (long period) plus all your WE trying to do it alone.
Check out my site for some pictures of the Workshop construction.

My 2 pences :wink:
By the driver a six-pack and he'll turn a blind eye if you take longer than your allocated time, and he'll back the lorry into more awkward spots which can reduce the "barrowing" distance.....

adan
 

Ham

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A couple of points worth a mention:

Don't forget building regulations - you may well be OK on the planning side but building regs will stop you from using wooden construction if you are going to be within a metre of the boundary. Your local council can supply you with a useful guide or go the the office of the deputy prime minister web site, which has all the data you could ever need.

As to the foundation - go for trench fill strip type and readymix. A group of strong friends and wheelbarrows will get the concrete moved down your garden plus you will find that readymix is as cheap as buying the materials and mixing it yourself. I just laid 2 cubic metre of foundations and it went very well.

Cheers

David
 

dedee

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I hope I have not beeen misunderstood. I too love to see wildlife in the garden but I would not want the mess and smell of them living under my workshop.

AndyP
 
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