Workshop build little way from home.

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sometimewoodworker

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Jonathan S":18bxy2fp said:
I was told it was pineapple wood but having researched it couldn't find much.
Was also told the locals used it in construction, oh and also it was dried in the sun vertically.
Someone was pulling your plonker, there is no pineapple wood


Though now you mention that wood is used in building it is almost certainly coconut wood


That is used by unscrupulous builders if they can get away with it. It's an appalling construction material as it rots within 5 years or so, but is extremely cheap so people still use it.

Though in the piece you show it's probably as good as any other wood as it won't get outdoor exposure nor be subject to termites.
 

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sometimewoodworker

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Tealeaf":sd9xumif said:
sometimewoodworker":sd9xumif said:
If there are any topics that are specially interesting please let me know and I can probably expand on those. I've been living away from my U.K. home for so many years now that I have become used to the unusual (to U.K. residents) strangeness and differences.
As someone who used to live in Watford, I'm also used to strangeness and differences!

I think I'm most interested in the woods available and a workshop tour. I'm so jealous of the space and wood choice that you must have there, although I would guess humidity plays havoc with movement?
It's nice to know I'm not just posting for myself. Feedback is always welcome.

I'll certainly post more on the workshop, there is a section on page 4 in posts
#p1115885 #p1115887 #p1180219 #p1180220 And SNEAK PEAK AT THE WORKSHOP #p1185150
Showing the construction

Here is one of the security grills I've had a local make to my design and fit.

[youtube]nAa0QL9AbYo[/youtube]

Also a demonstration of moving a full sheet on to my workbench for cutting

[youtube]5o1m3e9_10s[/youtube]

As to the wood species available it's rather difficult to know what exactly they are as the locals use local names and somthing like Mai Daeng (ไม้แดง) that translates to red wood isn't very helpful and even if you find the names Latin names they quite often don't have an English name.

Another point is that almost all wood in the wood yards is rough sawn so getting an idea of the grain patterns before buying is difficult. They will always plain the boards for a very reasonable price but unless there is a bad defect it's already yours.

I'm not buying often enough to build up knowledge of what there is, and what is available changes depending on what they have bought so even if I know the names of wood they may not have it or just substitute something else and not say.

For sheet goods it's a bit more clear. The best is Rubberwood, good quality, reasonably priced. Plywood is hit and miss, there is cheap low quality stuff easily available but better quality is not so easy and needs a 50km or 550km trip to get.

I've a few workshop projects to post soon and a workshop tour will ensure that some tidying up gets done.

As to humidity there is absolutely no problem as it's the variation in humidity that causes problems and in Thailand it is always moderate to high outside, my workshop is between 70% and 50% it's only if you run an AC full time your going to drop under that.
 

sometimewoodworker

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I forgot about the view I had from my workshop windows at the end of last year, it was rather worrying at the time, and only about 12 metres from the house.

Yes it was as loud as it sounds, my windows give a 30db drop in sound and it was loud in the house.

[youtube]dv-EmUjbPA4[/youtube]
 

MattyT

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Jonathan S":33szf9wc said:
Another here that's just seen this for the first time, very interesting build and great workshop!
Guess you get some intresting timbers in Thailand?
A friend of mine bought a small piece of timber back from his Thai travels and I had a play with it .....will try and find a photo of it , maybe you can confirm which timber it is, naturally the lid is beach.
I think it could be coconut wood : https://www.wood-database.com/red-palm/
 

Jonathan S

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Yep it's not pineapple .....definitely looks like coconut wood....thanks for the update.



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sometimewoodworker

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Jonathan S":1oecv7w8 said:
Yep it's not pineapple .....definitely looks like coconut wood....thanks for the update.
That would put it at around a Janka of 1600 – 2200 so harder than oak which is about 1,120. Also with a high silica content, so bad for your tools.

FWIW Wikipedia thinks that it's an OK building material, this directly contradicts the experience of people who have had it used in their houses locally.
 

Jonathan S

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Just out of interest....locally do they use this coconut wood for flooring?
It would be hard enough!
Maybe there is a stability problem?

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sometimewoodworker

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Jonathan S":1lp4y97n said:
Just out of interest....locally do they use this coconut wood for flooring?
It would be hard enough!
Maybe there is a stability problem?

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No, as I mentioned it's terrible stuff as it rots so quickly, none of the woodyards I've visited stock it, locals may use it in farm shacks. Also the beach bungalows use it as well as bamboo but I think the lifespan isn't long.

It's only in expensive places that wood floors (think termites) are used and if you are going to do that you may as well use better material like a nice hardwood.

Our place uses virtually no wood apart from some doorframes and furniture, it's all concrete and steel because of the termite problem.

This is one of the wood yards where they are OK with you picking through the stock
 

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sometimewoodworker

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Shop project

I needed more storage in the workshop. So I designed a cabinet with storage units doors. I had bought some very short shelf slides for about £0.50 each set in a Häfele sale without a specific purpose and they were OK though a little short

It is shop furniture so I decided to reverse the doors so the storage is on the outside rather than the inside.

I think the construction is self-explanatory but if more information is needed I'll be happy to provide it.

It is like almost everything and has wheels so if I want to try a different shop layout I have an easy time moving it.



The recess on the top at the back to allow access to the power points when it's against the wall whilst protecting plugs from being knocked out.

















It can also double as a temporary work surface. It is at a comfortable sitting hight and I may make a more permanent version later

 

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Jonathan S

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Cool ideas!
I get a lot of pleasure making storage solutions and jigs for the shop!

Jonathan

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sometimewoodworker

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Storage and location solutions.

I've standardised on a few things in the workshop, the first I'm going to mention is to add French cleats to the walls and other vertical faces. The benefits for me is that when I want to change places where tools and other things are placed it is just a case of ensuring that I have a French cleat in the new location or adding one.






Since the important part of the cleat is the top 45 degree face I've standardised on a relatively narrow rail this makes better use of material. I can do this as the walls are AAC blocks so I can fix virtually anywhere. I have also standardised on Rubberwood as the cleat material as it's reasonably priced and has quite good availability.




I needed a few more of the horizontally supports , this is the style that I've adapted.













They have got a couple of 20mm holes that can have rods through them like this

 

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