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Elaine

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Hello all
Finally back, did my first turning yesterday since my op in June :D

My new wooden workshop is up and I am looking for advice on the best way to stop things rusting, tools etc. Is there anything I can spray on, would insulating help etc?
I always get really good input and support here so thanks in advance.
 

CHJ

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How do you store all the bits and pieces, rests, chuck etc.?

If in a cabinet or set of draws can you put a low wattage (7-9) long life bulb in the bottom.
This is what I have, running 24/7 and never have a problem. (set of old kitchen draws)

Same can be done for the lathe if it has a throw over it during coldest weather.

All you have to do is keep the metal a couple of degrees above the surrounding air dew point and you will not have condensation/rust problems.

My HSS tools are in an open unprotected rack and for some reason have never had any rust problems, maybe because they are high up in the warmest air.

I'm fortunate in as much as my machines are subject to sunlight exposure during daylight (large windows) so maintain enough residual heat to keep them above ambient at night if covered up with a throw.

And this is in a workshop that is known to have running condensation on the metal framed windows in the winter months and is heated by the worst of all moisture creating heaters, a bottled gas portable fire.
 

Elaine

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Cheers Chas, as always you give me something that i can do to remedy the situation. I was trying to think ahead to the cooler days etc so using a throw etc is excellent.
I appreciate you taking the time to respond.
 

Chippygeoff

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Hi Elaine.

I had the same problem as you and now the colder weather is coming our way condensation can be a real problem. the long term answer would be to batten out the new workshop with 2 x 2 and put in 2inch polystyrene insulation and then cover the whole thing with half inch plywood. This operation is not cheap but it will keep your valuable tools and equipment free from rust for the life of the workshop.

Geoff.
 

Jacob

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CHJ":1oi2g1h9 said:
..........
And this is in a workshop that is known to have running condensation on the metal framed windows in the winter months
That's good news - as long as the condensation run-off is channeled away and drained to the outside. Your windows are then acting as very efficient passive de-humidifiers. Single glazing does it better but you get some benefit from DG too (on the dehumidifying front).
My windows pipe out gallons in cold weather, and in hard frost there are big icicles below the cills (outside)
,and is heated by the worst of all moisture creating heaters, a bottled gas portable fire.
In which case dehumidification is likely to be essential! Or good ventilation with associated heat loss.
 

CHJ

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Ventilation when heater on is very high due to extraction systems I use dumping air outside. Surprising thing is on the odd day that there is not enough sun to warm the shop for the old bones and the the gas heater is used with it's radiant clays positioned outside the direct flow path of the extraction air movement it provides substantial comfort heat without excessive dumping of warm air.
 

Jacob

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CHJ":dzpu93aa said:
....... Surprising thing is on the odd day that there is not enough sun to warm the shop for the old bones and the the gas heater is used with it's radiant clays positioned outside the direct flow path of the extraction air movement it provides substantial comfort heat without excessive dumping of warm air.
Radiant heat is directional and goes in straight lines radiating out from the source. So even a gas heater is a bit focused and will send all its heat to one side and not the other, however strong the draught. Better still is parabolic reflector such as those electric bar rads which send out a wide but flattish beam. I suppose they'd be better on-end so that the beam would be tall and narrow and hit more of the body.
I have an oil filled electric rad which doesn't heat the air in the building at all, but does warm the body if you stand near it. Or over it. It'll fit tidily in front of the bench if you happen to be doing bench work.
Not looking forward to winter at all. Hoping this will be my last in an unheated workshop. Not expecting to die (touch wood :shock: ) - am planning building improvements!
 

CHJ

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Having spent most of my formative years living on a farm with no electricity and buildings with more fresh air than insulation I've always been used to using localised radiant heat, in those days it was from paraffin (primus?) pressure heaters in working areas.
Amazing how a small paraffin 'sump' heater can keep a lorry or tractor frost free and comfortable to climb onto first thing in the morning. Likewise all tools likely to be prone to rusting were kept on shelves surrounding the walls of the building where the paraffin heated incubator unit was located.
So basically have never been a fan of heating space I didn't need to, just the tools or body whichever needs the comfort.
 

Elaine

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cheers everyone, you always give me something I can work which is great for getting my grey matter working too.
 
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