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mhannah

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Hi,

I will shortly be demolishing the rotting old 6x4 shed in my back garden and replacing it with the biggest wooden shed I can get away with - which I think will be 10x8. I would prefer to "self design/build"

Does anyone have a link to any plans, designs, photo diaries etc. of anyone doing similar?

A few problems I am considering :-

What to do with the contents of the current shed whilst I am building?
Wooden floor or concrete base?
What pitch should the roof be?
Do I need to design roof trusses?
What type of wood should I use?
Will regular white pine from one of the big DIY outlets do?

Any views and opinions would be welcome!
 

billybuntus

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I went almost mike g route.

With the slight change of 150mm concrete found then leveled the middle bit last with around 75mm of concrete (the ground was very very well compacted and already had hardcore under it).

I also skinned the exterior with 3/4 ply before covering in creosote then breather membrane and I'm going to batten and clad it in the new year.

I only added the exterior ply skin as I got all my wood for free to build it.
 

Lowlife

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When I built mine around 10 years ago I found This Book very useful, it covers pretty much everything from design and planning considerations, to construction, insulation, lighting and heating, and basic electrics. Well worth £6.95, or you can get it a little cheaper on http://www.abebooks.co.uk
 

joiner_sim

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With regard to the pitch of the roof, all the animal sheds we make at work are 14.04 degrees - a 1 in 4 angle.
 

mhannah

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mailee":bgnzyrmq said:
I built my own a few years ago. here is a link to it. http://www.readersheds.co.uk/share.cfm?SHARESHED=413 i also have the plans on Sketchup that i made before i built it if they are any use.
Thanks for this link Alan - that was quite a project!
Did you use a concrete base? I'm not sure from the pictures - it looks like you might have concreted some posts in and then built on top of these?

Mark.
 

mailee

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Yes Mark I placed about 18 concrete posts into the ground to a depth of 18" and then set blocks on top to a level.
I then built the base of 6x2s on top of these. It took two of us about two weeks to complete the build although the inside
was always ongoing. :lol:
 

mhannah

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So I think I have decided that I will use a concrete base for my new shed - partly because I think it will provide the best foundation and partly because I fancy playing with a cement mixer. :)

After some measuring I also think that I can increase the shed size to 12' x 8'.

Any recommendations on what mixture I should use?
Should it just be cement over a load of old rubble? Or should I be looking to mix gravel through it?
How do I ensure that I get a nice smooth surface?
Would this be possible up here in the frozen north in January?

Any ideas as how to calculate how much cement I would need for an 12' x 8' concrete base at 4" think?

Mark.
 

The Bear

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It's easier to use ballast rather than mix your own sand and gravel.
Mix is usually 6 to 1 or 5 to 1. You might want to consider reinforcing it to stop it cracking.. Needs to go on solid compacted ground, preferably over hardcore. A bulk bag of ballast is about 0.6 cubic metres, the cement makes little difference to the volume.

Mark
 

mhannah

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I am currently doing some planning for the roof design of my shed - which I have now decided will be 12' x 8'.

I am planning to frame the entire thing using wickes 1.5" x 2.5" CLS timber - simply because it is cheap and most of the prefabbed sheds I have looked at don't have a sibngle piece of timber even half as thick as this!

I am having some trouble with the roof design though.
I will have 20 degree pitch on the roof - and I am struggling to decide the best way to connect the sloping members of the roof truss to the supporting beam which will run the length of the shed.

I have a attached a picture of a couple of pieces that I have prepared to model the roof construction.

Any thoughts on how I should connect these?

Mark.
 

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lincs1963

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Hi!
I am assuming that you will be having a bottom chord on your 'truss'. That being the case you can simply nail or screw the rafter to the ridge board.
If you double up your wall plate you can probably get away with just one or possibly two ceiling ties or bottom chords, these will prevent the walls from spreading when the weight of the roof covering goes on. if you are intending to tile your roof you will need to put a tie across at every set of rafters.
Hope this is of help, regards, Neil.
 

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