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Workbenches - correct height

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Drew

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Hi

has anyone any ideas for working out the correct height for workbenches for my workshop.

Drew
 

PowerTool

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Don't know if there is a set height for them,but..
I am 5'10",have made my benches 3' high and find them comfortable.

Andrew
 

Argee

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I asked the same question some while ago (in another forum) about the height of my saw table when I was making a mobile base. The answer I got was that it should be the same height as the join between my hand and my wrist when standing relaxed with arms by my side. I put on my working footware and got my wife to measure that and then went ahead and built accordingly and I've found it very comfortable.

That said, I've also made my flip-up benches the same height, so I've got additional outfeed surfaces if needed. When I'm working with a dovetail jig, I tend to have that on a raiser, but otherwise I'm quite happy with the formula.

Ray.
 

Alf

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Drew":11hi7r51 said:
has anyone any ideas for working out the correct height for workbenches for my workshop.
Depends a good deal on what you want to use them for, Drew. Just amongst hand tool use there are probably about three different heights it'd be nice to have. For power tools, higher is often better, especially for routing.

Cheers, Alf
 

DaveL

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Drew,

The guide that David Charlesworth gives in his book is 4" below elbow height, standing straight with the forearms horizontal. I used this for the bench I made and its a lot higher that the old one I had. Take a look at the third picture here to see the difference.
I like working in this more upright position, my back feels better for it, only down side the old stool I have in the shop is now too low.
 

CHJ

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DaveL":1c4spmll said:
..snip..
I like working in this more upright position, my back feels better for it, only down side the old stool I have in the shop is now too low.
Same here Dave, although in my case I think age has a bit to do with it. I have raised both my bench and my lathe higher than the norm over the last year and leave the workshop feeling a lot more comfortable.
 

The Restorer

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A certain Mr Luckhurst advises on his courses that the workbench should be at a height where as a man you could rest your (you can guess) on it's surface without too much discomfort :shock: :lol: :wink:
He even provides blocks to go under the bench to achieve this (not that you're expected to test this theory! Just imagine!
 

Argee

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The Restorer":1ymbe3qa said:
A certain Mr Luckhurst advises on his courses that the workbench should be at a height where as a man you could rest your (you can guess) on it's surface without too much discomfort
Same as wrist/hand join height - in my case, anyway! :)

Ray.
 

Drew

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Many thanks for your replies, definite food for thought. I think its time to do some mock-ups to find which one is right for me.

Nice bench DaveL what a difference in heights from your old one.

Thanks again

Drew
 

Sgian Dubh

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Different users do prefer different heights I find. Some people shorter than I work on benches which are far too high for my comfort, and others are much too low. There are times when a lower work surface is good. If you are working on an assembled drawer or cabinet then a lower height can be useful. There are times when I've rigged up temporary stands that I put at the base of my bench whilst working on partially assembled components.

However, I suggest to anyone that asks this question to find a good compromise height by leaning their hip sideways against a wall or something similar. Where the boney 'knuckle' joint at the top of the thigh rests against the wall is pretty close and perhaps just an inch or so below the right height----- this assumes you've got a boney enough thighs and hips to do this test. In my case I'm built like a matchstick with most of the wood scraped off, ha, ha-- ha, ha, ha. Slainte.
 

ByronBlack

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I too agree with mr Luckhursts 'man-hood' measuring advice for workbenches. If this is too low for your preference, its easy to make some 'heightening' blocks, whereas if the bench is too high then its not so easy to accomdate other than cutting the legs. I like the versatility that a shorter bench with heigtening blocks gives.. just my two peneth.
 

Taffy Turner

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The Restorer":2bzazpbx said:
A certain Mr Luckhurst advises on his courses that the workbench should be at a height where as a man you could rest your (you can guess) on it's surface without too much discomfort :shock: :lol: :wink:
:D :D :D :D :D :D

I can just imagine the conversation with the Doctor on Monday morning..
"Yes Doctor, it is a bit of an unusual place to get a slinter, but it was like this see......."
:D
 
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