Quantcast

Workbench finish. Advice Please

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Mdotflorida

Established Member
Joined
7 Nov 2003
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Location
South Wales
Recently, I have been helping my neighbour make himself a workbench. He has an idea to take up woodworking now he has retired and has been using my shop for this project to see if he is interested enough to start getting his own workshop together.

He didn't want anything fancy, no hardwood etc. and we've constructed a really solid, 6 foot x 2.5 foot bench. The base is made out of softwood with ply cabinets and full extension drawers. The top is again pine, 2 inches thick with a 1 inch MDF top. He picked up a good Record vice on Ebay and is really pleased with the way things have turned out.

He wants to finish it with something really hard wearing for both the MDF top and the base. He does not want to change the colour much.

Can anybody suggest a finish that might work ?

Jeff
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Hi jeff
Two suggestions-workbenches get a LOT of stick, so a finish that can easily be removed is useful. I used Patina on my bench, athough I think it yellowed things a little. Water based poly will not turn the pine yellow, is tough and dries quick-might be worth a go.
My other suggestion is blonde shellac-won't change the colour, is easily (and seamlessly!) repairable and won't contaminate your workpieces in any way.
Hope this helps
Philly :D
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
1
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Jeff,

Personally, I would add a sacrifical top from hardboard which will take a beating rather better than MDF. However, if your friend doesn't like the idea of changing MFD's rather (dull, attractive??) colour then brown hardboard is not likely to please.

I would suggest a moderately hard wax like beeswax as the answer. Wax really helps shrug off spills and is easily repaired
 

Gill

Established Member
Joined
3 Sep 2003
Messages
3,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Lincs
I'll second Chris's suggestion of a sacrificial hardboard top. To make it easily replaceable, hold it in place with some countersunk screws.

Gill
 

Mdotflorida

Established Member
Joined
7 Nov 2003
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Location
South Wales
Thanks a lot for the suggestions.

He likes the idea of a replaceable hardboard surface so we will be adding that. As to finish, I have some beeswax and poly so we will do some test pieces. I've been interested in trying Patina for a while now so this may be a good time to buy some and give that a try as well.

Many thanks

Jeff
 

Taffy Turner

Established Member
Joined
24 May 2004
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
0
Location
The Land of My Fathers
Jeff,

If you go down the Patina route, rmember to leave the workshop windows open for a couple of days, as it pongs something awful until it is fully cured!

Other than that though, it is a finissh that I use a lot on turned items, and it is exteremely hard wearing.

Gary
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Gary,

Interested in your use of Patina on turned items. Do you use it with the lathe running, as per the usual friction polish?

Trev.
 

Mdotflorida

Established Member
Joined
7 Nov 2003
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Location
South Wales
Thanks

For the Poly or wax I would seal the wood with a base of sanding sealer. Is this necessary or advisable for a Patina finish ?

Jeff
 

Taffy Turner

Established Member
Joined
24 May 2004
Messages
1,067
Reaction score
0
Location
The Land of My Fathers
Trev,

My preferred finish is shellac sanding sealer with some kind of wax (friction, paste, stick) on top. However, when I need something more robust, I use Patina as follows:-

I apply the Patina with the lathe stopped. Rub it in well, let it dry and then buff it with the lathe running, either with a rag, or a handful of shavings. A couple of coats normally does for me.

If I want the finish to be as robust as possible (I use it on turned drinks coasters - it is excellent for that - no rings even from hot, damp coffee mugs), I leave it at that. However, the finish does look a little "plasticy".

If I want a more natural looking finish, I cut it back with 0000 grade wire wool, and then apply some Black Bison Paste wax. I leave this to dry for 10 mins or so, and then buff with a cloth with the lathe running. This gives a finish that is more natural looking, but is marked by water etc, although it just requires some more wax and a quick buff to restore it to pristine condition.

It is also an excellent finish for items that will be handled a lot - eg -light pulls, which in my experience are difficult to finish well so that they don't get grubby looking in use.

It says on the tin that it can be coloured by mixing with dyes, but I haven't tried that myself (I assume that they would have to be spirit based???).

Good luck if you decide to give it a go - don't forget to tell me what you think of it (apart from the smell!!!)

Cheers
Gary
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Gary,

My usual finishing method is the same as yours, i.e. sealer then wax, although I sometimes use a finishing oil for larger faceplate pieces.

Thanks for the very useful info. on how you use Patina. I have recently turned two floor-standing plant stands (base, spigot jointed column and top plate - one in oak, the other in spalted beech) and finished them in oil which was okay, but next time I make something similar, or which will benefit from a hard wearing finish I'll give your Patina process a try. When I do, in due course, I'll let you know how I get on with it. Sounds interesting and well worth a go. I have an unopened tin of it ready and waiting - so haven't experienced the smell yet!

Thanks again.

Cheers,

Trev.
 
Top