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Chris Knight

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I stumbled across this http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=9958 and had a look at the bloke's home page at http://www.adirondack.co.uk/ .

I really don't know if he does make any money but his worshop is well equipped.

I am pretty sure I would not like to make the same thing day, day out but I guess it is one way of cutting costs and increasing efficency to the point that woodworking becomes viable as a living.
 

Aragorn

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Could someone please explain to me the fascination with adirondack chairs?
There are just so many other types (have you seen some of the corkers in GWW this month?) - why is this model so popular, especially over the pond?
 

Dewy

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Possibly because the adirondak was traditionally made from any old bit of material you could find. Pallets & packing crates are the usual source. They're easy to make with very few joints.
 

Alf

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Chris,

I couldn't stand making the same thing day in, day out either, but that does seem to be the way to make money. :( When woodworking reaches that level of production line set up I question whether you mightn't as well go and buy something made in a factory, to be honest. Heigh ho. BTW, can somebody put me out of my misery and identify the make of P/T please? I can't quite put my finger on it.

Aragorn, I don't get it either, but then as I've never even sat in one who am I to judge?

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

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Aragorn,

I dunno - as basic loungers on a patio or deck they are probably not bad and you can balance a drink on the arm. I have however seen what you might call "evolved" adirondacks (and how DO you pronounce that word?) which have been sexed up with curved backs, sculpted arms and whatnot that make them look quite desirable - can't find a link at the mo' :oops: but I have seen one very beautiful one that made me more than a little lustful.
 

Noel

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Chris,

AD - A - RON - DACK named after the mountain range in the US where the design originated.

Rgds

Noel
 

Chris Knight

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Noel,

Thanks! But what's the "i" for?

Alf, I have no idea about the P/T either - but we need bigger ones!

PS Noel - Not "Ad-eye_rondak" then?
 

Dewy

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Do a search for adArondack & it asks if you meant adIrondack as well.
 

Noel

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Sorry Chris, phonetics, was what I was speaking. Like, as in how you say it, like.

Rgds

Noel
 
A

Anonymous

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Shortly I'm going to find out what it's like to make the same thing day in, day out and once in business that's what I'll have to get used to but the workshop will be well armed with two very important pieces of equipment, a kettle and a radio, that will make it bearable :wink:
 

Chris Knight

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Richard, Dog etc.

I made some planters - not my design I have to confess but I did make a lot for friends and family
( http://chrisknight.info/images/woodwork ... lanter.jpg )

and they would certainly lend themselves to mass production. The thin wood of the sides probably does require a good "outside" wood like oak or cedar..

BTW: I now have outside stuff made in both oak and cedar that have "sort of survived the last 25 years"
 
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Anonymous

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Nice looking planter Chris. The problem in the UK is finding people who appreciate something that has been made in a workshop by an individual and not mass produced in a factory. In the US people are quite happy to part with their cash for 'home crafted' wood work, here though, people look for 'car boot sale' prices and that is an up hill task ahead of me which is why I'm taking it slowly before I commit myself and funds into a business that may or may not be profitable.

Richard
 

mudman

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Alf":32h5m8gy said:
I couldn't stand making the same thing day in, day out either, but that does seem to be the way to make money. :( When woodworking reaches that level of production line set up I question whether you mightn't as well go and buy something made in a factory, to be honest.
Ah, but when you have got to that level of production, you should be at the point where you can hire a body or two to do the production line stuff while you go off and work on the design of your next product. Then you hire another body or two and get rpoduction moving then work on the next product. Before you know it you've created a vast empire creating quality wooden furniture and exporting it to Sweden and having very strange TV adverts made. :wink:

Cheers,
Barry
 

Noel

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Hi Dog(s)

Now you're talking (or sucking diesel, as they say overhere) a radio. Couldn't do without one in the shop. Now have one of those german trailing sockets with an FM radio in it stuck on the wall. Couldn't beat it with a big stick.

Rgds

Noel
 

johnelliott

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Alf":1siy69am said:
I couldn't stand making the same thing day in, day out either, but that does seem to be the way to make money. :( When woodworking reaches that level of production line set up I question whether you mightn't as well go and buy something made in a factory, to be honest.
I think that a self-employed woodworker will only have a viable business if he specialises and thus increases his speed and efficiency. Having said that, there will always be the need to spend time on marketing and other aspects of the business, so it isn't quite as boring as it might seem (says me who normally makes 8 doors at a time, 64 rails and styles makes quite a stack)
John
 
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Anonymous

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Here is one of a pair of Adirondack chairs that I made for my patio.

http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/dldund ... m=5651.jpg

They are easy enough to make, and have several advantages: they are very stable, they are comfortable (with a couple of cushions), and they have plenty of room on the flat arms for a plate of food and a drink. I would hate to make them for a living, though. You would die of boredom. My chairs follow Norm's design.

Rockerau
 

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