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Wood worktop problem

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Keith8

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Hi, we have a new (9 month old) worktop that has developed a crack in one end. I have treated the worktop twice in the past 9 months with the suppliers recommended oil and this area of the worktop in not subjected to heat or water. Our main issue is the manufacturer is saying this is normal shrinkage/wood settlement and is not taking responsibility.. I have checked the level and it is in fact slightly ‘concave’ so a tension crack would have started at the bottom and not the top.

I would greatly appreciate feedback from any kitchen fitters or anyone who might have had this problem.

I don’t want to name the kitchen supplier just yet as the kitchen is under one year old and therefore still under statutory warranty.
 

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Old.bodger

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Obviously it can happen (and did !) and yes they can fall back on the ‘natural material’ explanation. I would hope that they would replace it pdq to protect from reputational damage. Perhaps mention how keen you are to share this awful example of customer service on all the social media platforms!!
 

Doug71

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I see both sides of things like this.

I agree it doesn't look great or inspire confidence for the long term but it's wood and these things can happen.

It just looks like one rogue stave got in there and has spoilt the whole job.

Did you fit the worktops or did you get someone in? Problem in situations like this is the manufacturer will probably supply a new worktop under guarantee but they won't pay for it fitting, someone else has to cover that.

Personally I would leave it a while longer to make sure it has stopped moving then just fill it (epoxy?) and forget it, will save a lot of upheaval.
 

Ollie78

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You could route a single slot for a worktop zipbolt beneath the crack and try and pull it back together with some glue.

This is going to be hard to prove liability as they are not factually wrong in stating its a natural product and shrinkage and movement will happen.
However, from a customer services and company reputation standpoint they should probably just change it.
Or at least repair it as I suggested or with some epoxy maybe.
It is pretty unusual and never happened to any I have fitted ( I don't do hundreds though ) .


Ollie
 

Distinterior

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How has the worktop been fixed down?
Ideally, it should have some means to allow for the movement of the wood.
This is normally achieved by fixing it in position by slotted right angled brackets or if its fixed though the rails of the cabinets, there should be a large clearance hole through the rails and washers applied to the heads to the screws to allow the wood to move.

I dont do a lot of timber worktops, as most of my kitchens are really contemporary in design but, as I've described above, this is the method I've always used.

If all the fixings have been done correctly, then I would agree with Doug,.... its likely to be a rogue stave!
 
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Keith8

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I see both sides of things like this.

I agree it doesn't look great or inspire confidence for the long term but it's wood and these things can happen.

It just looks like one rogue stave got in there and has spoilt the whole job.

Did you fit the worktops or did you get someone in? Problem in situations like this is the manufacturer will probably supply a new worktop under guarantee but they won't pay for it fitting, someone else has to cover that.

Personally I would leave it a while longer to make sure it has stopped moving then just fill it (epoxy?) and forget it, will save a lot of upheaval.

Cheers Doug71, they provided the fitter. I was planning on using epoxy if they don’t want to help. Sound advice thank you
 

Keith8

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You could route a single slot for a worktop zipbolt beneath the crack and try and pull it back together with some glue.

This is going to be hard to prove liability as they are not factually wrong in stating its a natural product and shrinkage and movement will happen.
However, from a customer services and company reputation standpoint they should probably just change it.
Or at least repair it as I suggested or with some epoxy maybe.
It is pretty unusual and never happened to any I have fitted ( I don't do hundreds though ) .


Ollie

thanks Ollie78, I hope they see it from your point of view, don’t think I could even try the routing method. Let’s hope they do something or I am inclined to go the epoxy route, cheers
 

Jones

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I've not seen a crack like that open up in a worktop though slight warping is quite common. You could rout out the offending stave and replace or use a two pack filler. If you spent a lot I think you could ask the company to do it or pay for someone else to.
 

clogs

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
seen quite a few from Ikea do that and worse.....even when double sided/treated with an oil/varnish sealant.....
I actually wont fit em anymore....mind some of that is due to retirement.....lol.....
For my personal kitch we only have Granite or the like.....even our rental has Granite.....
a bit heavy on glasses tho....
 

doctor Bob

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I'd be gobsmacked if they replace it.
Shrinkage, movement and cracking will all be covered in their T & C's.
I don't know who supplied the worktop, however they are all pretty good at replacements provided they are rejected before cutting.
 

Sgian Dubh

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It has split along the parenchyma ray, which is the weakest radial plane in oak. Sometimes it just happens if there's a bit of shrinkage going on.
It's maybe, or may not be rot, but there appears to be some brown thickening in the medullary ray that's opened up which may be a contributory weakening factor. Slainte.
 

Doug71

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Alternative solution if you do go down the epoxy route.

1. Using a jigsaw extend and widen the split, the wigglier the better.

2. Fill with blue epoxy resin.

3. Give yourself a pat on the back and call yourself a maker, you have just created "The River Worktop", you never know it might catch on :unsure:
 

Adam W.

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It's maybe, or may not be rot, but there appears to be some brown thickening in the medullary ray that's opened up which may be a contributory weakening factor. Slainte.
There's also some weird lens shapes in the ray on the end grain.

As for rot, it might be worth giving the brown streak a poke with a sharp pencil to see if it's soft.
 

Jacob

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Faulty goods.
The whole point of that sort of composite engineered board is to use cheaper materials but without the risk of shrinkage, cracks etc. You could get less shrinkage with reasonably dry solid wood. They should have used ply or block-board with that veneer on top, and lipped it round.
Looks like it's been kept in good nick so it's their fault 100%
PS oh it's not veneer it's solid wood - what's that two tone effect? Still their fault!
 
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planesleuth

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This is not acceptable natural shrinkage, it is careless manufacture. Very, very few companies care these days about customer relations and social media threats wont really work and yes the most they will do is replace the top leaving you with the fitment bill.The worktop is unlikely made by the kitchen company. It has been mass produced by a bunch of oiks who have neglected to stagger the staves properly. Unfortunately the fitters were not able to cut the top so that this mis-manufacture was enclosed within the rest or within the sink cutout. The good news is it is very easy to remedy because it is at the end of the run. Find yourself a good quarter sawn piece of Oak and cut and plane it to size and at least one mill. thicker. Acclimatise it nearby for at least 4 weeks then router out the offending piece using an accurate template. Cut tongues and grooves to within 12mm of the end all around each piece Grooves in the worktop staves using router slotters and tongues in the replacement stave.Tap into position and glue in place.This is what I would do.
 

blackteaonesugar

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Perhaps mention how keen you are to share this awful example of customer service on all the social media platforms!!

Don't do this. Absolutely no need to break rule 1 at this stage.

It's unfortunate, but it's wood and it can happen. Being right at the end it would be possible to replace that one section, but if they're not interested, fill it with resin and get on with your life, would be my take.
 

baldkev

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Cut tongues and grooves to within 12mm of the end all around each piece Grooves in the worktop staves using router slotters and tongues in the replacement stave.Tap into position and glue in place.


If you cut an oak replacement piece, just put gooves in the worktop and the new piece, then glue in a loose tongue in worktop and slide your new bit in. I would stop the grooves short so they dont show on the end, hence loose tongues.

Ultimately, if it were me id get epoxy and a brown or black pigment.
 

screwpainting

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That end grain shot is showing that some sort of filler has already been used. It has shrunk more since that filler was used so, I think you either live with it and keep filling it or cut it out. That is a horrible stave.
 
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