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Newbie_Neil

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Hi all

I have seen the Triton wood storage in the Machine Mart catalogue and I like the multi levels. It is also rated at 50kg per row.

Does anyone have one or have anything good or bad to say about it? Or indeed recommend something else.

Your advice would be most welcome.

Cheers
Neil
 
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Anonymous

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I use 3 old ikea ladder rack units originally designed for holding up units between them - can't remember the fancy name for them. Similar idea but floor standing - only drawback is i have to slide long timber in and out from the end but as it faces the double doors in the workshop its not too bad. And I'm proud to say I freed them up for the workshop by replacing the actual ikea unit with one of my first wood projects :) One down, most of the rest of the house to go
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi MP

Your idea sounds good but unfortunately it won't work for me as I must have "front loading" storage.

Thanks
Neil
 

Chris Knight

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Neil,

Space problems in my workshop preclude horizontal storage and as a result I store my wood vertically once I bring into my shop from roof space in the garage - I usually do this a couple of months before using the wood so that it may acclimatise but in some cases wood has been in the shop for years before I have used it.

I have never had noticeable problems of warping etc from storing wood this way (planks stored this way are usually 9 feet six inches long which is as long as I can manage). I used to chalk up boards with their condition (I still do this for moisture content) so I had a record of bows, twists, cups etc. but I stopped this when I found out that I had no appreciable deterioration from vertical storage

Vertical storage offers huge advantages over horizontal storage from my point of view.

1. I can see what I've got without a lot of shifting of timber - simply tip a plank forward to see it.
2. I don't have to worry about a bunch of stickers and ensure they are all lined up nicely etc.
3. I can store a lot more on the same wallspace in this way - about 6 or 8 times more at a rough estimate.
4. Timber does not fall on me from high supports.
5. Big pieces of timber can be handled and stored this way eg the walnut for my chair comes in baulks that are 10 feet long by 20 inches wide by 2 1/2 inches thick - try lifting one of those onto a horizontal support!
 

Charley

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Hi Neil,

I also need to sort out a wood storage solution for my new workshop. I was thinking of just using the cheap shelving (uprights and brackets) from ScrewFix but the Triton system looks much better :) just a tad expensive for two packs :?
 

Alf

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waterhead37":odxz9u46 said:
eg the walnut for my chair comes in baulks that are 10 feet long by 20 inches wide by 2 1/2 inches thick - try lifting one of those onto a horizontal support!
I tell you what, Chris, you send me one and I'll try... :wink: :lol:

Neil, I like the look of the Triton stuff too, but as one of the only good spin-offs of the local post office closing was I got a load of their free-standing shelving free, gratis and for nothing I sharn't be having to stump up for them. :wink: Have you considered making your own? Not too difficult as I understand, and plenty of suggestions in the various workshop books and magazine articles, particularly from the States. One flexible one I recall seeing consisted of a grid of timber with angled holes for lengths of pipe. You could put in, or leave out, the pipe supports as required for short stock or long, or even storing boards on end.

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Chris

I thought that the reason that wood was so bad at B&Q/Wickes was primarily down to the way it was stored. You've just blown that misconception away.

One of the reasons that I really liked the Triton system was that I could still store things down at ground level.

Alf/Charley

I just want to get on and get my workshop finished, a lot of things have conspired to delay it. Hence the purchase of a racking system.

Thanks
Neil
 

Alf

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Neil, you were doing so well at remembering too. Did you untie the knot in your hanky or summat? :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Alf

Alf":j5c95jc5 said:
Neil, you were doing so well at remembering too. Did you untie the knot in your hanky or summat? :D
It was just another senior moment. :oops: I blame Wogan. :wink:

Cheers
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Charley

Charley":1hrwy8br said:
Hi Neil, I also need to sort out a wood storage solution for my new workshop. I was thinking of just using the cheap shelving (uprights and brackets) from ScrewFix but the Triton system looks much better :) just a tad expensive for two packs :?
I went along to look at the Triton system today and whilst I thought it would do the job I did not think it was good value. If it had been about 20 pound then I would have bought it. :roll:

So what about this http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?ts=13868&id=32988

Buy 10 for 19.99 and you get five levels. They would be about 11" deep which should be ok and it's rated at 50kg. Thanks for pointing me towards SFX.

Cheers
Neil
 
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Anonymous

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Neil

I use brackets made from angle iron. If your any good with a welding torch (or know someone who is) their very cheap, each bracket takes up about a metre of angle iron and using 4 brackets per row, this will comfortable support 3 m lenghts of stock.

I bought about 50 pounds worth of 1" x 1/4 angle iron and that made enough brackets to store roughly 100m of stock on the walls of the workshop.

Far more secure (I think) than anything you will find on the market and a lot cheaper.

Waka
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Waka

Thanks for the suggestion, you're right it is a very cheap solution. Unfortunately, neither I nor anyone I know can use a welding torch. :cry:

Cheers
Neil
 

Adam

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Neil,

I made a woodrack using 4 x 2 timber. (Mine outdoors - so I made it with the horrible treated stuff).

I used 3 "verticals" and then marked up the heights across all three I wanted my "shelves" at. I then drilled two holes through the verticals in each shelf position, spaced about 3 inches apart (vertically). I then screwed straight though into some suitable "horizontal" lengths of the same wood. E.g. the horizontals are only supported at the wall end - and only with two screws. I was a bit sceptical (despite making it myself) it would be strong enough, but having climbed up it to get access to the roof (and I'm 90kg :oops: ) I reckon it's fine. ( I did have my foot at the end where the verticals were!) It's been loaded up with timber ever since and hasn't sagged at all. You need 4 x 2 (rather than anything smaller) on the horizontals (and with "long" side vertical - to give you the cantilever effect

Works really well - and it really cheap. Doesn't take long to knock up.

Adam
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Adam

Thanks for your suggestion.

I really want steel fittings so that I lose as little space as possible at each level. This is because I want to use the space undeneath to "park" machinery.

Thanks again.

Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi NeilCFD

It looks wonderful and you've got all that space. I'm not jealous at all. :cry:

My steel fittings arrived this morning (thanks Charley) so I need to get on with the job now.

Cheers
Neil of Nottingham
 
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