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wood lipped chipboard panels

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sunnybob

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I have a couple small bathroom vanity cupboard doors that have started opening out at the corners due to water ingress.
The panels are beech faced chipboard with real wood lipping. I'm thinking of re-making these but have never used this type of construction before. I can easily make the thin beech lips, but will ordinary adhesive like titebond 3 be sufficient? And how do you sand the edges of the real wood without scratching the facings?
 

Racers

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I have glued on lipping to veneered MDF with PVA they are all holding up fine.
The lipping you can plane or scrape down depending on how brave you are, or make a base for your router like Steve M did in his wardrobe project.

Pete
 

sunnybob

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That would work":2mkaxlup said:
Or make a nosing feature on the bead?
Thats too technical for me :roll: Could you give a bit more info please?
 

That would work

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This is a nosed moulding... so the radius would sit proud of the surface.
You could glue and pin it on or make a tee section and put it in a groove around the edge of the panel.
 

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sunnybob

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Ah, In my ignorance i would have just called that a double roundover.
I like the idea of a T slot in the chipboard. Anytime i can use my router is a good time :lol: :lol:
 

That would work

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The tee section would be the moulding with a groove in the chipboard to accept the tongue on the moulding. Frankly that's a bit ott when you could glue and pin the moulding as shown onto the edge.
 

sunnybob

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I'm much happier setting up a router table than using tiny pins in places they will show when I miss hit with the hammer 8) 8) 8)
sometimes, complicated is good. =D>
 

sunnybob

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I had a trial run today on scraps.
good and not so good results.

I've proved I can cut the strips.
All the rest is bad. :roll:
The chip board cut well on the top edge, but well, it chipped, on the bottom edge. Seems like I need a different blade for cutting it.
I dont know how I can hold the strip in place while the glue is drying. My test piece showed it has to be clamped every few inches, and on a 50 cm wide cupboard door I dont have the sizes or amount of clamps.

No way can I size the beech once its on the door without damaging the surface finish. I would need to get it exactly right before gluing.

I think I've talked myself out of this project, which is a shame as I quite liked the idea.
 

AndyT

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In case you want to try again...

To avoid chipping, run along where the cut will come with a straight edge and a Stanley knife to score or cut right through the melamine.

To hold the strip in place, you can use masking tape - it's got enough stretch. Just go from one surface of the chipboard, round the strip, stretch, onto the other surface. Space the strips as close as you like.
 

That would work

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Are you buying the moulding? It's really not worth trying to make it.
Yes you will need a fine saw blade to cut the chipboard... what is on its surface? Some kind of laminate I assume? This will certainly need a fine toothed blade. Once you have a good edge to glue to you'll find good old masking tape at close intervals does a good job of holding the moulding on. But that's the key... a clean and square cut edge.
Edit:
OK just seen Andy's post above!
 

sunnybob

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I know where the cupboards were made, but that was 12 years ago now. I'll go and see if they are still in business, and if they can make replacements.
The making of the beech strips is the easy part for me.
I'll try again with a score line, but not convinced I will be able to match the score line exactly with the blade. My table saw isnt 100% accurate for long straight cuts as I havent needed it to be so far.
The problem is the whole place is 12 years old, so any new beech faced melamine is not going to match the existing, which means i would have to get 6 new doors rather than modify 2.
 

toolsntat

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Easiest way of dimensioning MFC is cut over size and router down to size. Either clamp on guide or router table set up as a planer.
Edging strips are best done oversize and can be trimmed down with a router table set up.
Parcel tape is the industry standard for clamping any of this type of work.
Cheers Andy
 

sunnybob

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I'll try a cut on the router table.
The table saw cut is only a little jagged. i can cut it a couple mm large and then skim on the router.
I have variable speed on the table, for a 1/2" straight cutter, would you think high or medium speed?
Would masking tape along the under edge reduce the chipping?
 

sunnybob

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I'm feeling quite pleased with myself (not often I say that when woodworking).
I took the two doors off the bathroom sink vanity unit, and cut the damaged sections off the top and bottom on the table saw, using a Freud 62 tooth blade.
Removed 70 mm in total, 50 top and 2 bottom

Not 100% factory perfect, but pretty close to it.
I searched through the offcuts for a piece of beech plank I knew I had somewhere. I thought it might be too short but when I offered it up, it was barely 4 mm too long! Result! =D> =D>
Then i used my thin strip jig and cut 4 mm beech strips and glued them on.
Note, the masking tape clamp idea was a failure, it wouldnt stick to the board. Luckily I have 4 clamps long enough so had to glue one, wait for it to set, then glue the next.
I trimmed the excess beech off on the router table, using a three bladed bearing guided bit that only removes about a half mm at a time, so no wood splinters.
Finish with a coat of wipe on varnish and it would take a woodworker on bended knee to spot the repair.

Now all I have to do is reduce the height of the cabinet by an appropriate amount and bolt it onto the wall (originally it was on a 4" plinth with tiles around, but 'er indoors wants everything of the ground to aid in mopping the tiles.

Picture me chuffed. 8) 8) 8) 8)
 

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