Quantcast

Wood ID challenge

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Steliz

Hamster
Joined
11 Dec 2017
Messages
368
Reaction score
11
Location
Hungary
I'm usually OK at identifying different wood species but I was given this by a neighbour (locale: Hungary) and I assumed it was Beech because it has a similar colour. I decided to use some last week to make a small box and, once cleaned up, I can see it doesn't look like Beech at all. The grain is very swirly and a pita to plane and the wood is very hard. It took me an age just to sand out the bandsaw marks using a ROS.
Is it Beech or something else?

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-xy9DhRoq9YYt.jpg

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-e4rPSsvGAGZY4e.jpg

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-iqM2LBV5XM.jpg

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-osbPTHZXiM.jpg

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-j0Q5vlWJOicxkJ.jpg
 

Attachments

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
2,716
Reaction score
53
Location
North West
it looks more like a fruitwood, could be cherry, or apple wood, that's my guess, it's not beech because there's no ray fleck in the end grain.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,446
Reaction score
269
Location
Pembrokeshire
I could be totally wrong but I think that looks a bit like Wild Cherry I've worked with before.
 

ED65

Established Member
Joined
3 Dec 2015
Messages
3,593
Reaction score
0
Steliz":2yq6k3mm said:
I'm usually OK at identifying different wood species but I was given this by a neighbour (locale: Hungary) and I assumed it was Beech because it has a similar colour.
Colour alone is no indicator of a wood as a general rule. You can quite easily find examples from a single species that are completely unalike in general colouring, some being fairly textbook but others being much lighter, maybe darker and others still with a tint that's unusual or very rarely seen (either due to natural variation or from storage conditions).

You want to look for grain characteristics, end grain most particularly, as reliable identification markers. With beech specifically it's a rare one in that it has a specific characteristic that transcends the colour of the piece or the wildness of the grain, almost every surface should show the characteristic dark flecks that mark the species. Here's a textbook example which is just as seen in your edging strips, and a more varied sample in this bowl.
 

Steliz

Hamster
Joined
11 Dec 2017
Messages
368
Reaction score
11
Location
Hungary
The consensus seems to be Cherry which fits in with the local area which is mostly family owned small holdings with vineyards and various fruit trees (for alcohol production!). I'll try and get a better picture of the surface as it seems to be a bit washed out by the sunshine.
 

sunnybob

software developers nemesis
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,290
Reaction score
109
Location
cyprus
If it is cherry, its a very nice piece. The cherry I have is extremely bland regarding shapes in the wood.
Definitely not beech.
 

Steliz

Hamster
Joined
11 Dec 2017
Messages
368
Reaction score
11
Location
Hungary
Here is a better picture of the planed surface.

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-dqhoPIKudIr0.jpg


Sunnybob, it does look very pretty. It has been sat out in the weather for years and was just grey when I got it but I cut off a piece to use and found this. This is the smaller one of the 4 bits I got.
 

Attachments

sunnybob

software developers nemesis
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,290
Reaction score
109
Location
cyprus
That needs to be sliced and used for a keepsake box, with the most rippled piece for the lid.
I dont use p-lanes at all so when I make a box from very hard wood, I just cut slowly on the bandsaw, then accept I have a lot of sanding to do. 60 and 80 on the belt sander, then 120,150,180,240, either on the little triangle power tool or plain old fashioned hand.

Good job I dont have to make money on them :shock: :roll: 8) 8)
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury
ED65":2ruajbxq said:
You want to look for grain characteristics, end grain most particularly, as reliable identification markers
Agreed, that's one way of identifying a timber; expert microscopic analysis of an end grain slice. The other way is equally as difficult and that's to look very carefully at the leaf and twig structure of the tree, or a botanical analysis. Any other method is simply guesswork and (unless it's a very common timber which we're all familiar with) will probably be wrong - Rob
 
Top