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Wolverine jig addition?

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nev

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Whilst fettling earlier today I couldnt help thinking that the wolverine setup could do with a little 'extra' to make life a little easier.
when sharpening the the bowl gouge for example, one rests the butt in the holder and gently rests the end on the grinding wheel and turns/twists/rolls to sharpen. see here... about 2 mins in (Warning - you may fall asleep!)
I would feel a lot more confident whilst doing this if I could rest or support my (left) 'rolling' hand.
this could easily be achieved with an adjustable T rest that could slide up and down the long bar. It would also help prevent a frightening dig in like the one i experienced a while back whilst attempting a steep bevel, as it would give some possible support in front of the wheel ?
Spent hours doing this primitive drawing
grinding_jig_250px2.jpg


Is it just me or does anyone else think the same? Feel free to shoot me down or state the obvious safety implications etc :)
 

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TEP

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Don't mind being 'devil's advocate'. If you need a bevel that steep, say 80deg. I would definitely used the table, not the arm. The fact is I use a home made copy of said jig, and ONLY use the arm for long grind spindle and bowl gouges, all other tools are done on the table.

Also I would be inclined to think that you may possibly be putting too much downwards pressure while grinding which would help it past the centre point to a dig in.
 

CHJ

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Can't see the point of the 'Tee'
1: provides no function as a rest,
2: difficult to adjust in height to even come close to the tool shank for thumb/finger rest and allow a safe approach of the tool to the wheel.
3: as shown it prevents quick lift of the tool clear of the wheel if needed, really and extension of the safety reservations of 2:

I go along with TEP, far far safer to have a tilting table rest to control the angles than the long arm if you are anywhere near centre line of the wheel.
 

Harlequin

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just a thought

if a dig in occurs with the rest in situ - the rest will act as a rigid pivot point , far better to have a hand supporting which will dampen the whole movement
 

CHJ

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It's my feeling that any 'dig in' with that type of jig because the tool bevel is getting too close to the wheel centre line is going to be pretty catastrophic, at least for the wheel, hopefully not the operator stood behind it.
 

CHJ

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Just re-read your OP, if you intend to use the 'Tee' under the tool to act as a support for your hand/fingers then I sincerely hope you never ever try to grind a steep nose angle requiring the tool edge to be near the centre line of the wheel.

One catch and trapped fingers under the tool shank/handle are going to provide a very subtle means of taking the shock load out of the tool/rest interface, to what extent your fingers will recover from the experience I would not like to predict but I have a feeling that any ideas about 'improving' your jig setup will not be foremost in your thoughts.
 

nev

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CHJ":2296zusk said:
Just re-read your OP, if you intend to use the 'Tee' under the tool to act as a support for your hand/fingers then I sincerely hope you never ever try to grind a steep nose angle requiring the tool edge to be near the centre line of the wheel.

One catch and trapped fingers under the tool shank/handle are going to provide a very subtle means of taking the shock load out of the tool/rest interface, to what extent your fingers will recover from the experience I would not like to predict but I have a feeling that any ideas about 'improving' your jig setup will not be foremost in your thoughts.
point taken #-o
 
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